40 WHAT IS ITIL®?

ITIL40 WHAT IS ITIL®?

1 2 INTRODUCTION ………………………………………………………………………………………………………….

15 CUSTOMER SERVICE ……………………………………………………………………………………………………

16 2.2 2.3 2.4 FOUR COMPONENTS OF CUSTOMER SERVICE ……………………………………………………………………………..19 WHO ARE YOUR CUSTOMERS? ………………………………………………………………………………………………20 TELEPHONE TECHNIQUES …………………………………………………………………………………………………….21 Enhancing your communication……………………………………………………………………………..25 Exercise ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………26 2.8.1 2.8.2 2.9 FACE-TO-FACE AND ONE-TO-ONE CONTACT ……………………………………………………………………………….27 First Impressions ………………………………………………………………………………………………….27 To the customer you are the company ……………………………………………………………………28 Presenting Yourself ………………………………………………………………………………………………28 Does Listening Mean Hearing? ………………………………………………………………………………29 Body Language…………………………………………………………………………………………………….33 COMMUNICATIONS ……………………………………………………………………………………………………….34 Communication Barriers ……………………………………………………………………………………36 2.9.1 2.9.2 2.9.3 2.9.4 2.9.5 2.10 2.10.1 3 IT SERVICE MANAGEMENT …………………………………………………………………………………………..

37 3.1 3.2 3.3 3.4 THE FOUR PERSPECTIVES (ATTRIBUTES) OF ITSM ………………………………………………………………………..38 BENEFITS OF ITSM ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………39 BUSINESS AND IT ALIGNMENT……………………………………………………………………………………………….40 WHAT IS ITIL®? ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………….42 Good practices …………………………………………………………………………………………………….44 3.4.1 4 COMMON TERMINOLOGY ……………………………………………………………………………………………

45 4.1 4.2 WHAT ARE SERVICES? ………………………………………………………………………………………………………..48 PROCESSES & FUNCTIONS ……………………………………………………………………………………………………49 Defining Processes ……………………………………………………………………………………………….49 Defining Functions ……………………………………………………………………………………………….51 RACI Model………………………………………………………………………………………………………….52 ©The Art of Service 4.2.1 4.2.2 4.2.3 12 5 THE SERVICE LIFECYCLE ………………………………………………………………………………………………..

54 5.1 5.2 MAPPING THE CONCEPTS OF ITIL® TO THE SERVICE LIFECYCLE …………………………………………………………55 HOW DOES THE SERVICE LIFECYCLE WORK? ……………………………………………………………………………….56 6 SERVICE DELIVERY PRINCIPLES ……………………………………………………………………………………..

58 6.1 SERVICE LEVEL AGREEMENTS ………………………………………………………………………………………………..58 Service Level Agreement Structures ………………………………………………………………………..59 6.1.1 6.2 IT SERVICE CATALOGUE ………………………………………………………………………………………………………62 Scope of a Service Catalogue …………………………………………………………………………………63 Benefits ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………64 What should the Service Catalogue represent? ………………………………………………………..64 6.2.1 6.2.2 6.2.3 7 SERVICE OPERATION PRINCIPLES …………………………………………………………………………………..

68 7.1 7.2 OBJECTIVES …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….68 SERVICE OPERATION FUNCTIONS ……………………………………………………………………………………………69 The Help desk ………………………………………………………………………………………………………70 Technical Management ………………………………………………………………………………………..77 IT Operations Management …………………………………………………………………………………..80 Application Management ……………………………………………………………………………………..82 7.2.1 7.2.2 7.2.3 7.2.4 7.3 — Active Directory …………………………………………………………………………………………………

119 Using Group Policies to manage users ………………………………………………………………….

120 User and Group Accounts……………………………………………………………………………………

121 VIRTUALIZATION…………………………………………………………………………………………………………….

121 BACKUP ROUTINES …………………………………………………………………………………………………………

122 Full Backups ……………………………………………………………………………………………………..

123 Differential Backups …………………………………………………………………………………………..

123 Incremental Backups ………………………………………………………………………………………….

124 8.4.1 8.4.2 8.4.3 8.5 TCP/IP NETWORKS ………………………………………………………………………………………………………..

124 Network Addressing …………………………………………………………………………………………..

126 DHCP ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………….

126 DNS …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

127 Virtual Private Networks …………………………………………………………………………………….

128 Email Protocols …………………………………………………………………………………………………

129 8.5.1 8.5.2 8.5.3 8.5.4 8.5.5 9 10 11 12 REVIEW QUESTIONS ………………………………………………………………………………………………….

131 ANSWERS TO REVIEW QUESTIONS ………………………………………………………………………………

137 HELP DESK GLOSSARY ………………………………………………………………………………………………..

144 INDUSTRY CERTIFICATIONS ………………………………………………………………………………………..

153 12.1 12.2 12.3 ITIL® CERTIFICATION PATHWAYS …………………………………………………………………………………….

153 ISO/IEC 20000 PATHWAYS …………………………………………………………………………………………

154 CLOUD COMPUTING ……………………………………………………………………………………………………

155 13 INDEX ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..

157 ©The Art of Service 14 1 Introduction The rapid change and increased complexity of Information Communication Technologies (ICTs) in the last two decades has raised the level of skill required by users to produce their daily business deliverables.

The resulting exponential increase in the reliance on the services provided by Help Desk has raised the importance of the role that Help Desk plays in the functioning of an organization.

Customers need an efficient and reliable interface to the technology area to ensure they can effectively function in performing their own business processes.

Customers are also demanding greater customization of services provided.

Creating a first class help desk is therefore an imperative for many organizations in order to be competitive in the modern environment.

To enable such business outcomes around what the customer is demanding, the Help Desk needs to be one of the best-equipped teams, considering they have the greatest customer contact in comparison with the rest of the IT organization.

Skills such as listening, clarifying expectations, updating the customer and responding to customer demands are vital aspects for keeping the customer satisfied.

Each service interaction influences the customer?s perception of Help Desk and the IT department as a whole.

In the case of external service providers (e.g.

Internet Service Provider), the quality of customer interaction facilitated by the Help Desk will directly influence the perception of the entire organization and assist in the maintaining high customer retention levels.

This book will seek to provide current or prospective Help Desk staff with the knowledge and skills to ensure that every customer contact (e.g.

calls or emails to the Help Desk) result in affecting positive customer satisfaction.

It will also provide an overview of the IT Service Management practices that will likely be utilized within the IT organization and the technical knowledge and skills required in order to deliver high quality IT support.

15 ©The Art of Service — Communication Barriers No matter how good the communication system is, unfortunately barriers can and do often occur.

This may be caused by a number of factors which can usually be summarized as being due to physical barriers, system design or additional barriers.

These barriers should not be used as an excuse for poor customer service.

Each of these can be seen as a challenge, and working through those challenges can be incredibly rewarding.

If you feel that you cannot communicate well with your customer, it is possible that you are taking the wrong approach.

Of course, there are some things that may make it more difficult to make a good impression for example: ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? Background Noise Language Culture Disinterest Experience Education Emotion Vocabulary Mood.

©The Art of Service 36 3 IT Service Management The term IT Service Management is used in many ways by different management frameworks and the organizations that seek to use them.

While there are variations across these different sources of guidance, common elements for defining ITSM include: ? ? ? ? Description of the processes required to deliver and support IT Services for customers.

A focus on delivering and supporting the technology or products needed by the business to meet key organizational objectives or goals.

Definition of roles and responsibilities for the people involved including IT staff, customers and other stakeholders involved.

The management of external suppliers (partners) involved in the delivery and support of the technology and products being delivered and supported by IT.

The combination of these elements provide the capabilities required for an IT organization to deliver and support quality IT Services that meet specific business needs and requirements.

Formal definitions of ITSM define it as “A set of specialized organizational capabilities for providing value to customers in the form of services”.

These organizational capabilities are influenced by the needs and requirements of customers, the culture that exists within the service organization and the intangible nature of the output and intermediate products of IT services.

However IT Service Management comprises more than just these capabilities alone, being complemented by an industry of professional practice and wealth of knowledge, experience and skills.

The ITIL® framework has developed as a major source of good practice in Service Management and is used by organizations worldwide to establish and improve their ITSM practices.

37 ©The Art of Service 3.1 The Four Perspectives (Attributes) of ITSM Partners/Suppliers People Process Products/Technology Figure 3.A – Four Perspectives (Attributes) of ITSM There are four perspectives (“4P?s”) or attributes that are important to consider in order for IT Service Management to be successful.

Partners/Suppliers Perspective: Takes into account the importance of Partner and External Supplier relationships and how they contribute to Service Delivery.

It will help to ensure that suppliers deliver value for money, and provide services that are clearly aligned to business requirements.

People Perspective: Concerned with the “soft” side of ITSM.

This requires IT staff, customers and other stakeholders to understand the purpose of ITSM and how it should be used within the organization.

Training and education should be provided to ensure staff members have the correct skills, knowledge and motivation to perform their roles.

Products/Technology Perspective: Takes into account the quality of IT services themselves, and all technology architectures (hardware & software) required to provision them.

Technology should be leveraged to both support and drive strategic opportunities for the business.

©The Art of Service 38 Process Perspective: Relates the end-to-end delivery of services based on process flows.

By having clearly established processes (with documentation, guidelines and other supporting tools), it will enable a more consistent, repeatable and measurable approach to the management of services.

Quality IT Service Management ensures that all of these four perspectives are taken into account as part of the continual improvement of the IT organization.

It is the same when designing new or modified Services themselves, in that these four perspectives need to be considered and catered for in order to enable success in its design, transition and eventual use by customers.

— performing the technical activities are optimized according to the greatest business need or reward.

As these activities are technology specific (e.g.

configuring application server), they will not be a focus of this book?s content.

Each layer within this structure is utilized to support the layer(s) above.

At the same time, each layer will in some way influence the layer below them.

For example, a business process that is required to be executed at all times without disruptions (e.g.

emergency health services) would result in highly resilient IT services being implemented, supported by ITSM processes that reduce the risk and impact of disruptions occurring.

Our Business: A fashion store What are some of our organization?s objectives or strategic goals? ? ? We want to increase profits by 15% each year We want to have a good image and reputation, with a loyal customer base.

What Business Processes aid in achieving those objectives? ? ? ? ? What ? ? ? Figure 3.B – Business and IT Alignment ? 41 Retail/sales Marketing Manufacturing Procurement, HR, finance etc.

IT Services are these business processes dependent on? Web sites (internal and external) Communication services (email, video conferencing) Automatic procurement system for buying products Point of Sale Services.

©The Art of Service We have ITSM in order to make sure the IT Services are: ? ? ? What we need (Service Level Management, Capacity Management etc.) Available when we need it (Availability Management, Incident Management etc.) Provisioned cost-effectively (Financial Management, Service Level Management) If we don?t manage the IT Services appropriately we cannot rely on these services to be available when we need.

If too many disruptions occur, we cannot adequately support our business processes effectively and efficiently.

If the business processes are operating as they should, we will ultimately fail to support and achieve our overall organization?s objectives! Also note the relationship between IT Service Management processes and the technical activities below.

Used properly, ITSM processes can optimize the time, effort and other resources spent performing technical activities, ensuring that all staff actions are working in accordance to agreed business priorities and objectives.

This is just a simple example used to illustrate the relationship between ITSM and the organization.

Any approach used to improve ITSM practices should always be carefully considered to ensure that the plans suit the organization, in terms of: ? ? ? ? Size (number of staff, customers, IT devices etc.) Geographical dispersion Culture and ethos Current maturity and capability levels.

3.4 What is ITIL®? ITIL® stands for the Information Technology Infrastructure Library.

ITIL® is the international de facto management framework describing “good practices” for IT Service Management.

The ITIL® framework evolved from the UK government?s efforts during the 1980s to document how successful organizations approached service management.

By the early 1990s they had ©The Art of Service 42 produced a large collection of books documenting the “best practices” for IT Service Management.

This library was eventually entitled the IT Infrastructure Library.

The Office of Government Commerce in the UK continues to operate as the trademark owner of ITIL®.

ITIL® has gone through several evolutions and was most recently refreshed with the release of version 3 in 2007.

Through these evolutions the scope of practices documented has increased in order to stay current with the continued maturity of the IT industry and meet the needs and requirements of the ITSM professional community.

ITIL® is only one of many sources for ITSM good practices, and should be used to complement any other set of practices being used by an organization.

Five volumes make up the IT Infrastructure Library (Version 3).

? ? ? ? ? Service Strategy Service Design Service Transition Service Operation Continual Service Improvement.

Each volume provides the guidance necessary for an integrated approach, and addresses capabilities? direct impact on a service provider?s performance.

The structure of the ITIL framework is that of the service lifecycle.

It ensures organizations are able to leverage capabilities in one area for learning and improvements in others.

The framework is used to provide structure, stability and strength to service management capabilities with durable principles, methods and tools.

This enables service providers to protect investments and provide the necessary basis for measurement, learning and improvement.

In addition to the core publications there is also ITIL Complimentary Guidance.

This consists of a complimentary set of publications with guidance specific to industry sectors, organization types, operating models and technology architectures.

At present, this complimentary guidance is available by subscription from http://www.bestpracticelive.com.

43 ©The Art of Service 3.4.1 Good practices Ignoring public frameworks and standards can needlessly place an organization at a disadvantage.

Organizations should seek to cultivate their own proprietary knowledge on top of a body of knowledge developed from using public frameworks and standards.

Public frameworks (ITIL, COBIT, CMMI etc.): Frameworks are scaled and adapted by the organization when implemented, rather than following a prescriptive set of practices (standards).

Examples of public frameworks for ITSM include: ? ? ? ITIL ®.

COBIT – The Control Objectives for Information and related Technology.

Capability Maturity Model Integrated (CMMI) for IT Services.

Standards: Usually a formal document that establishes uniform engineering or technical criteria, methods, processes and practices.

Unlike frameworks, they are prescriptive in declaring mandatory elements that must be demonstrated.

Examples of standards relating to ITSM are: ? ? ISO/IEC 20000 – International Standard for IT Service Management.

ISO/IEC 27001 – International Standard for Information Security Management Systems.

Proprietary knowledge of organizations and individuals: Specific expertise developed for internal purposes, or developed in order to sell to other organizations (e.g.

Gartner).

Generally good practices are defined as those formalized as a result of being successful in wide-industry use.

©The Art of Service 44 4 Common Terminology Critical to our ability to deliver and support IT services in a consistent fashion is the need to be able to speak a common language with other IT staff, customers, end-users and other involved stakeholders.

This chapter documents the important common terminology that is used throughout the majority or IT organizations world-wide.

Terminology IT Service Management: Capabilities: Explanations A set of specialized organizational capabilities for providing value to customers in the form of services.

The ability of an organization, person, process, application, CI or IT service to carry out an activity.

Capabilities can be described as the functions and processes utilized to manage services.

These are intangible assets of an organization that cannot be purchased, but must be developed and matured over time.

The ITSM set of organizational capabilities aims to enable the effective and efficient delivery of services to customers.

Resources: A generic term that includes IT Infrastructure, people, money or anything else that might help to deliver an IT service.

considered to be tangible assets of an organization.

Process: A set of coordinated activities combining and implementing resources and capabilities in order to produce an outcome and provide value to customers or stakeholders.

Processes are strategic assets when they create competitive advantage and market differentiation.

They may define roles, responsibilities, tools, management controls, policies, standards, guidelines, activities and work instructions if they are needed.

45 ©The Art of Service Resources are also Service: A means of delivering value to Customers by facilitating outcomes customers want to achieve without the ownership of specific costs or risks.

The role of the Service Provider is to manage these costs and risks appropriately, spreading them over multiple customers if possible.

Functions: A team or group of people and the tools they use to carry out one or more Processes or Activities.

Functions provide units of organization responsible for specific outcomes.

ITIL® Functions covered include: ? ? ? ? Help desk Technical Management Application Management IT Operations Management.

Process Owner: The person/role responsible for ensuring that the process is fit for the desired purpose and is accountable for the outputs of that process.

Example: The owner for the Availability Management Process Service Owner: The person/role accountable for the delivery of a specific IT Service.

They are responsible for continual improvement and management of change affecting Services under their care.

Example: The owner of the Payroll Service Process Manager: The person/role responsible for the operational management of a process.

There may be several managers for the one process.

They report to the Process Owner.

Internal Service Providers: — 52 A RACI Model is used to define the roles and responsibilities of various Functions in relation to the activities of Incident Management.

General Rules that exist: ? ? Only 1 “A” per row can be defined (ensures accountability, more than one “A” would confuse this).

At least 1 “R” per row must be (shows that actions are taking place), with more than one being appropriate where there is shared responsibility.

In the example RACI model given, the Help desk is both responsible and accountable for ensuring that incidents are logged and classified, but not responsible for the subsequent investigation, which in this case will be performed by other functional teams.

53 ©The Art of Service 5 The Service Lifecycle Lifecycle: The natural process of stages that an organism or inanimate object goes through as it matures.

For example, human stages are birth, infant, toddler, child, pre-teen, teenager, young adult, adult, elderly adult and death.

The concept of the Service Lifecycle is fundamental to ITIL® Version 3.

Previously, much of the focus of ITIL® was on the processes required to design, deliver and support services for customers.

As a result of this previous focus on processes, Version 2 of the ITIL® Framework provided best practices for ITSM based around the how questions.

These included: ? ? How should we design for availability, capacity and continuity of services? How can we respond to and manage incidents, problems and known errors? As Version 3 now maintains a holistic view covering the entire lifecycle of a service, no longer does ITIL® just answer the how questions, but also why? ? ? ? Why does a customer need this service? Why should the customer purchase services from us? Why should we provide (x) levels of availability, capacity and continuity? By first asking these questions it enables a service provider to provide overall strategic objectives for the IT organization, which will then be used to direct how services are designed, transitioned, supported and improved in order to deliver optimum value to customers and stakeholders.

The ultimate success of service management is indicated by the strength of the relationship between customers and service providers.

The 5 phases of the Service Lifecycle provide the necessary guidance to achieve this success.

Together they provide a body of knowledge and set of good practices for successful service management.

©The Art of Service 54 This end-to-end view of how IT should be integrated with business strategy is at the heart of ITIL?s® five core volumes.

5.1 Mapping the Concepts of ITIL® to the Service Lifecycle There has been much debate as to exactly how many processes exist within Version 3 of ITIL®.

Questions asked include: ? ? ? What exactly constitutes a process? Shouldn?t some processes be defined as functions? Why has x process been left out? In developing this material, we have based our definitions of processes and functions and where they fit on the guidance provided by the ITIL® Foundation syllabus by EXIN International.

Figure 3.B demonstrates the processes and functions of ITIL® in relation to the 5 Service Lifecycle Phases.

It also demonstrates the increased scope now covered by ITIL® Version 3.

Figure 5.A– The Major Concepts of ITIL® 55 ©The Art of Service Note: ? ? ? ? The Service Lifecycle phases (and ITIL® books) are shown through the arrows at the bottom The concepts in light shading are the ITIL® V3 processes covered within the program The concepts in dark shading are Functions Processes that are not covered by the current ITIL V3 Foundation syllabus (currently 4.2), are not discussed fully in this book, but will be referenced where necessary for understanding.

5.2 How does the Service Lifecycle work? Although there are five phases throughout the Lifecycle, they are not separate, nor are the phases necessarily carried out in a particular order.

The whole ethos of the Service Lifecycle approach is that each phase will affect the other, creating a continuous cycle.

For this to work successfully, the Continuous Service Improvement (CSI) phase is incorporated throughout all of the other phases.

Figure 3.C demonstrates some of the key outputs from each of the Service Lifecycle Phases.

Figure 5.B – How does the Service Lifecycle Work? ©The Art of Service 56 It is important to note that most of the processes defined do not get executed within only one lifecycle phase.

Service Strategy Phase: Determine the needs, priorities, demands and relative importance for desired services.

Identifies the value being created through services and the predicted financial resources required to design, deliver and support them.

Service Design Phase: Designs the infrastructure, processes and support mechanisms needed to meet the Availability requirements of the customer.

Service Transition Phase: Validates that the Service meets the functional and technical fitness criteria to justify release to the customer.

Service Operation Phase: Monitors the ongoing Availability being provided.

During this phase we also manage and resolve incidents that affect Service Availability.

Continual Service Improvement Phase: Coordinates the collection of data, information and knowledge regarding the quality and performance of services supplied and Service Management activities performed.

Service Improvement Plans developed and coordinated to improve any aspect involved in the management of IT services.

57 ©The Art of Service — (Incident Management) An unplanned interruption to an IT Service or reduction in the Quality of an IT Service.

Any event which could affect an IT Service in the future is also an Incident.

For example Failure of one disk from a mirror set.

Incident Management (Incident Management) The Process responsible for managing the Lifecycle of all Incidents.

The primary Objective of Incident Management is to return the IT Service to Customers as quickly as possible.

Information Technology (IT) The use of technology for the storage, communication or processing of information.

The technology typically includes computers, telecommunications, Applications and other software.

The information may include Business data, voice, images, video, etc.

Information Technology is often used to support Business Processes through IT Services.

IT Infrastructure Library (ITIL) A set of Best Practice guidance for IT Service Management.

ITIL is owned by the OGC and is developed in conjunction with the itSMF.

ITIL consists of a series of publications giving guidance on the provision of Quality IT Services, and on the Processes and facilities needed to support them.

See http://www.ogc.gov.uk/index.asp?id=2261 for more information.

Key Performance Indicator (KPI) A Metric that is used to help manage a Process, IT Service or Activity.

Many Metrics may be measured, but only the most important of these are defined as KPIs and used to actively manage and report on the Process, IT Service or Activity.

KPIs should be selected to ensure that Efficiency, Effectiveness, and Cost Effectiveness are all managed.

©The Art of Service 148 Term Knowledge Management Definition The Process responsible for gathering, analyzing, storing and sharing knowledge information within an Organization.

The primary purpose of Knowledge Management is to improve Efficiency by reducing the need to rediscover knowledge.

— Workaround (Incident Management) (Problem Management) Reducing or eliminating the Impact of an Incident or Problem for which a full Resolution is not yet available.

For example by restarting a failed Configuration Item.

Workarounds for Problems are documented in Known Error Records.

Workarounds for Incidents that do not have associated Problem Records are documented in the Incident Record.

©The Art of Service 152 12 Industry Certifications 12.1 ITIL® Certification Pathways There are many pathway options that are available once you have acquired your ITIL® Foundation Certification.

Below illustrates the possible pathways that are available to you.

Currently it is intended that the highest certification is the ITIL® V3 Expert, considered to be equal to that of Diploma Status.

Figure 12.A – ITIL® Certification Pathway For more information on certification and available programs please visit our website http://theartofservice.com.

153 ©The Art of Service 12.2 ISO/IEC 20000 Pathways ISO/IEC 20000 Standard is becoming a basic requirement for IT Service providers and is fast becoming the most recognized symbol of quality regarding IT Service Management processes.

Once you have acquired your ITIL® Foundation Certification, you are eligible to pursue the ISO/IEC 20000 certification pathways.

ISO/IEC 20000 programs aim to assist IT professionals master and understand the standard itself and issues relating to earning actual standards compliance.

Figure 12.B – ISO/IEC 20000 Certification Pathway For more information on certification and available programs please visit our website http://theartofservice.com.

©The Art of Service 154 12.3 Cloud Computing Regardless of the size, complexity and ownership of the IT infrastructure, utilizing appropriate ITSM principles will always add value for customers and the IT service provider(s).

In the case of cloud computing environments, ITSM capabilities will need to be adapted somewhat to suit the organization?s needs, but the underlying core practices and principles should still remain the same.

To cater for this need, we have developed a set of education programs that provide individuals with the skills and knowledge required for managing cloud-based IT services.

The certification pathway is made up by the following levels: Foundation: The Cloud Computing Foundation program is focused on ensuring that the candidate can explain: ? ? ? ? the various ways in which cloud environments are used for IT service provision the benefits that clouds offer to customers and IT organisations alike important terminology relating to cloud computing technologies supporting cloud computing and the primary vendors involved.

155 ©The Art of Service After passing the Foundation exam, the participant is awarded two points towards achieving their Executive Level certification.

Specialist: The Specialist Level programs are aimed at the ‘practitioners’ involved n the management of cloud environments and related services.

Rather than just a basic understanding, these programs seek to ensure that participants demonstrate the skills and knowledge to actually manage cloud environments with the use of IT Service Management processes.

The Specialist Level is broken into three programs: ? ? ? Software as a Service (SaaS) + Web Applications Virtualization Platform & Storage Management — C CAB/EC 146 capabilities 32, 38, 40-1, 62, 72, 76, 82, 85, 106, 115, 126 Capability Maturity Model Integrated (CMMI) 39 capacity 49-50, 87, 122, 145-7 Capacity Management 37, 87, 144-7 career 1, 4 catalog 3 Change Management 100, 103-5, 110, 146, 148, 150 CIs (Configuration Items) 60, 62, 83-5, 144-7, 149, 151 client 125-6 closure 95, 105 CMDB 73, 146-7 CMMI (Capability Maturity Model Integrated) 39 CMS (Configuration Management System) 59-60, 62-3 COBIT 39 communication 7, 16, 20, 22, 29, 44, 46, 58, 67-8, 96, 135, 141, 145, 148, 151 company 2, 7, 11-12, 19, 23 competence 30 competitive advantage 41-2, 45 complaints 18, 103 components 14, 43, 60, 62, 83, 86, 103, 146, 150-1 behavioral 46 physical 46, 78 computers 6, 114-15, 117, 119-21, 126, 130, 136, 142, 148 concepts 8, 12, 40, 43, 49, 51-2, 110, 114, 126 Configuration Item (CI) 40, 60, 62, 144-7, 149, 151-2 Configuration Records 146-7 continuity 49-50 Continuous Service Improvement (CSI) 52, 144 CORE Business Processes 35 Correlation Engines 84 costs 41-4, 54, 68-9, 73-4, 101, 104, 115, 119, 135-6, 141-2, 147 CSF 147 customer approaches 24 Customer-based SLAs 56 customer contact 10 customer enquiries 44, 131, 137 customer interaction 10 customer loyalty 11 Customer Reviews 3 customer satisfaction, positive 10 customer service 1, 4, 7, 11-14, 16, 22, 29, 31, 132, 138 customers 1, 7, 10-19, 21-35, 37, 40-1, 43-4, 46, 49-50, 53-62, 64, 72-3, 103, 147-8, 151-2, 155 D database 99, 118-19, 122, 126, 147, 149 local security 120 delivery 32, 35, 42, 46, 62, 64, 81, 146, 152 department 1, 10, 12, 15, 17-18, 35, 66, 75, 79, 103-4, 115 ©The Art of Service 158 dependencies 59-60, 87, 145 design 16, 34, 46, 49, 53, 64, 76, 79, 85, 110, 112, 149 Desktop Environments 8, 114, 116 development 54-5, 58-60, 110, 123, 149 DHCP (Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol) 9, 124-5, 133, 139 DHS (Definitive Hardware Store) 147 diagnose 77, 79, 98, 149 differential backups 9, 122-3 DNS (Domain Name System) 9, 124, 126 domain names 126, 134, 140 DSL (Definitive Software Library) 147 Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol see DHCP E e-mail 16, 22, 56, 129 Email Protocols 9, 129-30 end-users 40, 72, 125 Event Correlation 84, 86 Event Management 8, 81-6, 90, 109, 134, 140 events 28, 48, 78, 82-6, 95, 133-4, 139-40, 148 F Financial Management 37, 144-8, 150 full backups 9, 122-3, 132, 138 G Group Policy 119 GUI (graphical user interface) H hardware 33, 43, 114-15, 118, 120, 128, 146-7, 149-50 Help desk 8, 41, 44, 48, 67-9, 72-4, 81, 86, 88, 93, 95-7, 104-6, 132, 138, 148-9, 151 Help Desk Manager 4, 72 HR (Human Resources) 36, 56, 107-10 I ICF (Internet Connection Firewall) 116 IMAP 124, 129-30, 134, 140 Incident Management 8, 37, 48, 81, 85-7, 89-91, 97-9, 102, 131, 137, 148-9, 152 incidents 48-9, 53, 62, 69, 73, 86-8, 90-100, 109, 131, 137, 147-52 information 2, 15-16, 18, 29, 39, 42, 58-60, 62-3, 84-5, 93, 103, 106-8, 119-20, 126, 146-8, 153-4 infrastructure 35, 41, 43, 53, 75-6, 78, 83-4, 86-8, 95, 98-9, 110, 112, 114, 133, 139, 144 IP (Internet Protocol) 123-6, 134, 140 IPv4 124-5 IPv6 124-5 ISO/IEC 9, 39, 154 114 159 ©The Art of Service ITIL (IT Infrastructure Library) 7-9, 32, 37-41, 47, 49-52, 66, 97, 148, 153-4 ITSM 1, 7, 32-5, 37-9, 49, 80 K knowledge 1, 4, 10, 14, 32-3, 53, 58, 62, 65, 69, 94-5, 116, 149, 155-6 Known Error (KE) 49, 71, 99-102, 149 KPIs 147-8 L license 45, 49, 63, 80, 89, 91, 147 lifecycle 49-50, 52, 79-80, 135, 141, 144, 146-50 Link Layer 124, 134, 140 Local Help 68 Log/record Incidents 96 M management 22, 32, 42, 46, 53, 58, 64, 78, 87, 110, 119, 133, 139, 144, 146-7, 149-51 MDT (Microsoft Deployment Toolkit) 115 MOE (Managed Operating Environment) 115, 136, 142 MTA (Mail Transfer Agent) 130 Multi-level SLAs 55-6 N network 116-17, 123, 125, 128-30 network administrator 5, 125-6 O OGC 45, 49, 63, 80, 89, 91, 148 OLA (Operational Level Agreement) 149, 151 Operating System (OS) 5, 8, 114-19, 121, 133, 139 operational management 42, 45 Operations Control 78, 135, 141 Operations Management 8, 41, 75, 77-8 P Point of Sale (POS) 36, 55 policies 12, 41, 45, 61, 104, 106-7, 110, 118, 149 POP3 124, 130, 134, 140 Problem Management 8, 81, 84, 86, 88, 96, 98-101, 149-50, 152 problems 5, 28, 49, 62, 98-102, 118, 123, 133, 139, 147, 149-50, 152 protocols 124, 128-30, 134, 140 Q quality R ©The Art of Service 4, 10, 33-5, 43, 53, 148, 154 160 RACI Model 7, 47-8 Release Management 145, 147, 150 Request for Changes (RFCs) 110, 150, 152 Request Fulfillment 8, 81, 87, 103, 105 request models 104-5 responsibilities 23, 32, 34, 41, 45-8, 54, 66, 76, 79, 81, 87-8, 96, 104, 151 Role Conflict 108 root cause 86, 88, 98-9, 101, 150 S security 54, 83, 109-10, 118, 144 Service 12-13, 41-4, 53, 62, 144-8, 151-2, 156 service availability 53-4, 65, 103 Service Catalogue 8, 58-63, 151 Service Level Agreements 8, 54, 58, 85, 151 Service Level Management (SLM) 37, 55, 60, 85, 145, 149, 151 Service Level Targets 145-7, 151-2 service lifecycle 8, 38, 43, 49-52, 85, 110, 112 Service Management 1, 4, 7, 32-5, 37-40, 50, 62, 74, 76, 78, 80, 83, 85, 148 Service Operation 8, 38, 46-7, 64, 66, 81, 84, 98, 109, 112, 134, 140 service packs 115-16, 118 Service Portfolios 58, 62 service requests 72, 87, 103-5, 107, 110, 132, 135, 138, 141, 151-2 Single Point of Contact 72, 148, 151 SSL (Secure Sockets Layer) 124, 129 stakeholders 32-4, 41, 44, 46, 50, 94 Standard Changes 103, 105, 152 STANDARD OPERATING ENVIRONMENTS (SOES) 8, 114 subnetting 125 support first-line 1, 139 second-line 4, 72 T TCP (Transmission Control Protocol) 123-4 Technical Management (TM) 8, 41, 66, 74-6, 133, 139 tools 1, 6, 34, 38, 41, 45, 47, 65, 73, 104, 108, 111-12, 115, 144 Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) 123-4 U Underpinning Contracts user accounts 119-20 V VBF (Vital Business Function) 145, 152 Virtual Private Networks 9, 128 virtualization 9, 120-1, 156 Vital Business Function (VBF) 145, 152 151-2 161 ©The Art of Service W Windows Server 119 workarounds 71, 99, 102, 149, 152 ©The Art of Service 162

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Accredited ITIL Foundation, Intermediate and Expert Certifications

Accredited ITIL Foundation, Intermediate and Expert Certifications, Learn more about ITIL HERE:

ITIL and Accredited ITIL Foundation, Intermediate and Expert Certifications

ITIL - Accredited ITIL Foundation, Intermediate and Expert Certifications

ITIL and Accredited ITIL Foundation, Intermediate and Expert Certifications

ITIL - Accredited ITIL Foundation, Intermediate and Expert Certifications

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