An Example Of A Change Management Model

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Change is inevitable.  All organizations change in small ways continuously.  But when
dealing with big changes, an organizational change management is important.  There are
several change management models being utilized and modified today.  While they may
have different approaches, depending on the situation that they are going to confront,
their objective is always for the company to successfully implement the change process
in a smooth and efficient way.

One of the change management models still being popularly applied today is Lewin’s
Change Management Model.  Conceptualized by psychologist Kurt Lewin in the 1950s, it
emphasizes three stages of change:  unfreezing, modification, then refreezing.  He
explains that people do not usually accept change as a part of the work process and would
continually stay in their comfort-zone.  In overcoming this status quo, the organization
must motivate the people for change to be implemented.

Modification involves a transition from the current state to the desired state.  This is the
second stage in Lewin’s Change Management Model.  The transition may be a little
uncomfortable for most employees but with proper motivation and good leadership, the
organization will still be able to implement the change.  The modification period is very
critical because it will involve a lot of trainings, skills transfer, and the most sensitive of
all, personnel re-alignments and even reduction.

The third stage, refreezing comes when the workforce has already embedded the change
in their system–until another unfreezing happens.

While Lewin’s Change Management Model may be an effective and simple way of
implementing change, some criticize it for not properly processing the after-effects of the
change on the employees’ morale (like the fear of having another change coming).

There is really no perfect approach for change.  Integrating other change management
models with Lewin’s Change Management Model is better than just using one model
alone.  You may also want to study Kotter’s Eight Step Change Model, Beer’s Model,
McKiney’s 7-s Model, and Shaw’s Model.mfx capitalsq