Podcasting

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Podcasting

RSS TV – Podcasting

RSS-compliant feeds that use enclosures for video/audio (podcasting) are fully compliant with RSS-TV. RSS-TV compliant clients will display these feeds as a list of menu items and will play (or download) the media.

Uses of podcasting

Uses of podcasting

Uses of podcasting

Podcasting refers to the creation and regular distribution of podcasts through the Internet. Podcasts, which can include audio, video, PDF, and ePub files, can be subscribed to and downloaded through web syndication or streamed online to a computer or mobile device. Subscribers are then able to view, listen to, and transfer the episodes to a variety of media players.

Uses of podcasting – Public services

Unofficial audio tours of museums

Uses of podcasting – Public services

Official cultural or historic audio tours of cities

Uses of podcasting – Public services

In 2006, the online magazine Slate began textcasting articles to their readers, by attaching a written article to a blank audio file and delivering the content to readers through their regular podcasting mechanism.

Uses of podcasting – Public services

Advocacy. The 5,500 locked out staff (editors, journalists, technicians, hosts, etc.) of the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation were podcasting news and other programming during August and September 2005.

Uses of podcasting – Public services

Youth media. Podcasting has become a way for youth media organizations, such as Youth Radio, to bring youth perspectives to a wider audience.

Uses of podcasting – Public services

Public libraries can podcast local publications free of Copyright, offering spoken word alternatives to the visually impaired. Non-profit organizations podcast readings of short-format magazine articles for visually impaired readers.

Uses of podcasting – Public services

Law enforcement. The Chicago Police Department has a free video podcast of its half-hour weekly news magazine called “CrimeWatch,” which airs on local TV. It documents community policing (CAPS) success stories.

Uses of podcasting – Public services

Educational Institutions use Podcast for self-guided Campus Tour.

Uses of podcasting – Podcasting in K-12 Education

Podcasting affords iPods and other mobile audio players a double life: a usefulness for both entertainment and education

Uses of podcasting – Podcasting in K-12 Education

To acquire information

Uses of podcasting – Podcasting in K-12 Education

To learn interactive ways to communicate knowledge to real audiences

Uses of podcasting – Podcasting in K-12 Education

To develop sense of audience and purpose when reading, writing, and speaking

Uses of podcasting – Podcasting in K-12 Education

To develop a student ownership of language

Uses of podcasting – Podcasting in K-12 Education

To encourage active participation and learner-centered focus

Uses of podcasting – Podcasting in K-12 Education

To develop multicultural awareness

Uses of podcasting – Podcasts for Students

There are many uses for podcasting for the classroom

Uses of podcasting – Consuming Podcasts

Apple Incorporated introduced iTunes U, a nationwide expansion of a service that puts course lectures and other educational materials online and on-the-go via Apple’s iTunes software. In 2006 there were over 400 podcasts from K-12 classes listed on iTunes and over 900 education-related podcasts listed on Yahoo. Students reported that replaying podcasts facilitated the comprehension of complex concepts and increased understanding for non-native language learners.

Uses of podcasting – Creating Podcasts

Educators who use podcasting with students argue that it offers learners and teachers flexibility and learner control, opportunities for learner motivation, clarity of instruction, novelty of engagement, widening of ‘locations’ in which learning is situated – an expansion of the temporal and spatial, engagement with and collaboration around dialogue, and opportunities for learners to get involved in construction of learning for others.

Uses of podcasting – Podcasts for Teachers

Podcasting can be a tool for teachers or administrators to communicate with parents and the wider community about curriculum plans and content, student assignments and other information.

Uses of podcasting – Classroom Use

Instructors appear to use podcasts in several ways within academic settings

Uses of podcasting – Professional Development

Podcasting provides professional development that can be accessed when it is needed

Uses of podcasting – Professional Development

A variety of professional resources are available for teachers:

Uses of podcasting – Professional Development

Techpod: Podcast for Teachers – offers interviews with educators, authors, and ed techies; curriculum ideas; news resources; technology tips; and research that educators can use in the classroom.

Uses of podcasting – Professional Development

Wikispaces: Podcasting in Education: http://podcasting-in-education.wikispaces.com

Uses of podcasting – Professional Development

Teaching with Podcasts – Read Write Think: http://readwritethink.org/professional-development/strategy-guides/teaching-with-podcasts-30109.htm

Uses of podcasting – Professional Development

K-12- Podcasts Downloads on iTunes: http://itunes.apple.com/ca/genre/podcasts-education-k-12/id1415?mt=12

Uses of podcasting – Professional Development

Web Tools 4u2use: http://webtools4u2use.wikispaces.com/Audio+%26+Podcasting

Uses of podcasting – Professional Development

Podstock: The Education Podcast Network: http://mtweb.mtsu.edu/podcast/

Uses of podcasting – Educational Concerns

The following are concerns that need to be considered when using podcasts:

Uses of podcasting – Educational Concerns

Quality – Discussions of quality sometimes relate to the technical quality (sound quality, organization of content), just as one might discuss proper development of an essay or a novel but in the context of technology and sound.

Uses of podcasting – Educational Concerns

Authenticity – Authenticity comes into play when thinking about who is making the podcast and why.

Uses of podcasting – Educational Concerns

Freedom of Speech – The question of individual freedom of speech is especially relevant when the podcast is a personal statement of position, such as might be found in political podcasts, personal journal podcasts, and organizational podcasts to support a specific point of view.

Uses of podcasting – Educational Concerns

Technical Support – Podcasts require considerable hard drive space for storage of files and bandwidth for playing them back. Training is required to teach teachers how to podcast and integrate the technology into the classroom. Creating podcasts can be technically challenging for the average student and additional support is needed in the classroom.

Uses of podcasting – Educational Concerns

Copyright – One must have permission to use certain content before it is mixed in personal material.

Uses of podcasting – Educational Concerns

Censorship – Podcasting is not regulated, and the content can be unsuitable for students.

Uses of podcasting – Educational Concerns

Privacy – Teacher and student privacy concerns must be addressed.

Uses of podcasting – Podcasts in Higher Level Education

Mobile Learning: Podcasting can be categorised as an m-learning strategy for teaching and learning

Uses of podcasting – Podcasts in Higher Level Education

There podcasting can be used for sales enablement (see case study) with the goal of having the sales employee aware and knowledgeable on the companies products, processes, initiatives etc

Uses of podcasting – Podcasts in Higher Level Education

Language Learning: Podcasts can be used to both inside and outside the language learning classroom. Teachers can record and publish their daily lessons for students to download to their MP3 players for endless practice. There are also predesigned websites where native speakers publish stories and language learners can respond via a comment function. This combines the use of podcast with blogs.

Uses of podcasting – Podcasts in Higher Level Education

Journalism Education: School podcasts can be created to expose students to journalism and new-media concepts. Regularly released “news” podcasts can be released by a school group.

Uses of podcasting – Podcasts in Higher Level Education

Academic Journal Digests: The Society of Critical Care Medicine has a podcast used to update clinicians with summaries of important articles, as well as interviews.

Uses of podcasting – Podcasts in Higher Level Education

Supply Chain Management Education: In October, 2007, Dr Stephan Brady presented his paper on “Podcasting in Supply Chain Education” at the CSCMP Educators Conference. In this paper he outlined how podcasting can be used in and outside of the classroom for enhancing supply chain courses through blended, or hybrid learning.

Uses of podcasting – Podcasts in Higher Level Education

Professional Development: Professional development podcasts exist for educators. Some podcasts may be general in nature or may be slightly more specific and focus on the use of interactive white boards in the classroom.

Uses of podcasting – Podcasts in Higher Level Education

Religion: Godcasting has been used by many religious groups. Many churches produce podcasts of talks and sermons. Disciples with Microphones provides podcasts relating to the Catholic Church.

Uses of podcasting – Podcasts in Higher Level Education

Tutorials: A tutorial on almost any subject can be created as either an audio podcast or video vodcast. Through screencasting, many video podcasts demonstrate how to use software and Operating Systems.

Uses of podcasting – Entertainment

Comedy. Comedians such as Ricky Gervais, Stephen Fry and Marc Maron have created some of the most popular podgrams.

Uses of podcasting – Entertainment

Television commentary. Battlestar Galactica writer and executive producer Ronald D. Moore creates commentary podcasts for each new episode of Battlestar Galactica. Other television shows such as Doctor Who have since followed suit.

Uses of podcasting – Entertainment

Radio series. Some radio programmes such as The Now Show and The News Quiz allow entire episodes to be downloaded as podcasts.

Uses of podcasting – Entertainment

As a platform for fan DVD-style commentary tracks (Audio commentary). Enables fans to add their own comments and thoughts to any of their favourite films.

Uses of podcasting – Entertainment

Sports. In 2005, unofficial podcasts for major sports teams launched, providing fans both in and outside of the teams’ direct broadcast areas with on-demand commentary. The Cubscast founders also formed the first city-specific sports podcast network, hosting one podcast for each major Chicago team.

Uses of podcasting – Entertainment

Reintroducing Classical Children’s Literature. Podcasts such as Albert Lea Public Library’s Classics On-the-Go program bring classical (noncopyrighted) children’s literature back to life for everyone to share.

Uses of podcasting – Entertainment

Fiction. Podcasts like Escape Pod are used to distribute short stories in audio book format. Other podcasts distribute stories in the format of radio drama.

Uses of podcasting – News

The San Francisco Chronicle is believed to be the first major daily newspaper to start podcasting using an external website, in Feb 2005

Uses of podcasting – News

Communication from space. On 7 August 20 ng.

Uses of podcasting – News

Conference and meeting alerts. Podcasts can be packaged to alert attendees to agendas, hosted roundtables and daily feedback.

Uses of podcasting – Music

Whereas streaming a performance live over the Internet requires careful coordination of person and machine, podcasting offers the ability to do slight time-shifting of performances and greatly reduces the complexity of the effort

Uses of podcasting – Politics

Politics: In the U.S., both major political parties have various podcasts, as do numerous politicians. One popular podcast is the White House RSS feed that provides the public with President Weekly Addresses, White House Speeches, White House Press Briefings and White House features.

Uses of podcasting – Publicity and marketing

As a promotional vehicle for an upcoming event, such as Pixar’s Cars Video Podcast, which advertised the release of Disney/Pixar’s Cars animated feature film with a series of behind-the-scenes clips.

Uses of podcasting – Health

Health and wellness education are widely accessible to the public through podcasts. Many developed countries such as Australia have utilised podcasts to publish new findings in the medical field. The National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) has been one of the active participants in informing the public of new drugs and processes to improve medical awareness.

Uses of podcasting – Special interests

Farm Podcasting makes information available about farming. The term was coined to identify a program that is produced exclusively as a podcast on the subject of agriculture. There are now multiple companies who specialize in farm podcasting, producing regular programming on agriculture targeted to farmers and the general public.

Uses of podcasting – Non-traditional and alternative content

A way for people and organizations to avoid regulatory bodies, such as the British Ofcom or American Federal Communications Commission (FCC), that would not allow a program to be broadcast in traditional media.

History of podcasting

Podcasting, first known as “audioblogging” has its roots dating back to the 1980s. With the advent of broadband internet and portable digital audio playback devices such as the iPod, began to catch hold in late 2004. Today there are more than 115,000 English-language podcasts available on the internet, and dozens of websites available for distribution at little or no cost to the producer or listener.

History of podcasting – Precursors

Before the advent of the World Wide Web, in the 1980s, RCS (Radio Computing Services), provided music and talk-related software to radio stations in a digital format. Before online music digital distribution, the MIDI format as well as the Mbone, Multicast Network was used to distribute audio and video files. The MBone was a multicast network over the Internet used primarily by educational and research institutes, but there were audio talk programs.

History of podcasting – Precursors

Many other jukeboxes and websites in the mid-1990s provided a system for sorting and selecting music or audio files, talk, segue announcements of different digital formats. There were a few websites that provided audio subscription services. In 1993, the early days of Internet radio, Carl Malamud launched Internet Talk Radio which was the “first computer-radio talk show, each week interviewing a computer expert.” It was distributed “as audio files that computer users fetch one by one.”

History of podcasting – Precursors

Independent of the development of podcasting via RSS, a portable player and music download system had been developed at Compaq Research as early as 1999 or 2000

History of podcasting – Precursors

In 2001, Applian Technologies of San Francisco, California introduced Replay Radio (later renamed into Replay AV), a TiVo-like recorder for Internet Radio Shows. Besides scheduling and recording audio, one of the features was a Direct Download link, which would scan a radio publishers site for new files and copy them directly to a PC’s hard disk. The first radio show to publish in this format was WebTalkGuys World Radio Show (WebTalk Radio), produced by Rob and Dana Greenlee.

History of podcasting – Popularization

As is often the case with new technologies, pornography has become a part of the scene, producing what is sometimes called podnography. Other approaches include enlisting a class full of MBA students to research podcasting and compare possible business models, and venture capital flowing to influential content providers.

History of podcasting – Popularization

The growing popularity of podcasting introduced a demand for music available for use on the shows without significant cost or licensing difficulty. Out of this demand, a growing number of tracks, by independent as well as signed acts, are now being designated “podsafe”. (See also Podcasting and Music Royalties.)

History of podcasting – Popularization

Podcasting has been given a major push by conventional media and can be read about further in podcasting by traditional broadcasters.

History of podcasting – Popularization

Podcasting has also been picked up by some print media, e.g. newspapers, who supply their readers with spoken versions of their content.

History of podcasting – Popularization

Podcasting has presented both opportunities and challenges for mainstream radio outlets who on the one hand see it as an alternative medium for their programs while on the other hand struggle to identify its unique affordances and subtle differences

History of podcasting – Popularization

One of the first examples of a print publication to produce an audio podcast to supplement their printed content was the international scientific journal Nature. The Nature Podcast was set up in October 2005 by Cambridge University’s award-winning “Naked Scientist”, Chris Smith, who produces and presents the weekly show.

History of podcasting – Popularization

Although firm business models have yet to be established, podcasting represents a chance to bring additional revenue to a newspaper through advertising, subscription fees and licensing.

History of podcasting – Coping with growth

While podcasting’s innovators took advantage of the sound-file synchronization feature of Apple Inc.’s iPod and iTunes software—and included “pod” in the name—the technology was always compatible with other players and programs

History of podcasting – Coping with growth

When it added a podcast-subscription feature to its June 28, 2005, release of iTunes 4.9, Apple also launched a directory of podcasts at the iTunes Music Store, starting with 3,000 entries. Apple’s software enabled AAC encoded podcasts to use chapters, bookmarks, external links, and synchronized images displayed on iPod screens or in the iTunes artwork viewer. Two days after release of the program, Apple reported one million podcast subscriptions.

History of podcasting – Coping with growth

Some podcasters found that exposure to iTunes’ huge number of downloaders threatened to make great demands on their bandwidth and related expenses. Possible solutions were proposed, including the addition of a content delivery system, such as Liberated Syndication; Podcast Servers; Akamai; a peer-to-peer solution, BitTorrent; or use of free hosting services, such as those offered by the Internet Archive.

History of podcasting – Coping with growth

Since September 2005, a number of services began featuring video-based podcasting including Apple, via its iTunes Music Store, Participatory Culture Foundation and Loomia. Known by some as a vodcast, or vidcast, the services handle both audio and video feeds.

Dave Winer – Podcasting

Winer has been given “credit for the invention of the podcasting model.” Having received user requests for audioblogging features since October 2000, especially from Adam Curry, Winer decided to include new functionality in RSS 0.92 by defining a new element called “enclosure,” which would pass the address of a media file to the RSS aggregator. He demonstrated the RSS enclosure feature on January 11, 2001 by enclosing a Grateful Dead song in his Scripting News weblog.

Dave Winer – Podcasting

The term “podcasting” was suggested by Ben Hammersley in February 2004.

Dave Winer – Podcasting

Winer also has an occasional podcast, Morning Coffee Notes, which has featured guests such as Doc Searls, Mike Kowalchik, Jason Calacanis, Steve Gillmor, Peter Rojas, Cecile Andrews, Adam Curry, Betsy Devine and others.

Podcasting

A ‘podcast’ or ‘netcast’ is a Digital media|digital medium consisting of an episodic series of digital audio|audio, digital video|video, PDF, or ePub Computer file|files subscribed to and downloaded through web syndication or streamed online to a computer or mobile device. The word is a neologism and portmanteau derived from broadcast and pod from the success of the iPod, as audio podcasts are often listened to on portable media players.

Podcasting

Podcasting contrasts with webcasting (Internet streaming), which generally isn’t designed for offline listening to user-selected content.

Podcasting

As discussed by Richard Berry, podcasting is both a converged medium bringing together audio, the web and portable media player, and a disruptive technology that has caused some in the radio business to reconsider some of the established practices and preconceptions about audiences, consumption, production and distribution

Paul Thurrott – Podcasting

He is the host of Windows Weekly with co-hosts Leo Laporte and Mary Jo Foley, a podcast focusing on weekly news of Microsoft, Microsoft Windows, Xbox 360, and other Microsoft and computing related topics. Windows Weekly attracts approximately 80,000 downloads for each episode.

Paul Thurrott – Podcasting

In 2011, Thurrott also became a regular contributor to the [http://www.guysfromqueens.com/ GFQ Network], and co-host of [http://www.guysfromqueens.com/what-the-tech/ What The Tech] along with co-host and GFQ Network founder, Andrew Zarian.

Leo Laporte – Podcasting

Laporte owns and operates a podcast network, TWiT.tv (network)|TWiT.tv. Its shows are available on iTunes and other podcast subscription services. Before the expansion to new facilities in 2011, Laporte said TWiT earns $1.5 million annually on a production cost of only $350,000. In a 2012 Reddit posting, he commented that revenue is approaching $4 million.

Leo Laporte – Podcasting

Laporte calls his audio and video shows netcasts, saying I’ve never liked the word podcast. It causes confusion … people have told me that they can’t listen to my shows because they ‘don’t own an iPod’ … I propose the word ‘netcast.’ It’s a little clearer that these are broadcasts over the Internet. It’s catchy and even kind of a pun.[http://www.twit.tv/2006/09/22/a_cast_by_any_other_name The TWiT Netcast Network with Leo Laporte]

Sky News Australia – Podcasting

Sky News offers various programs via podcast including First Business, Market Day, Showbiz, Agenda, Australian News Week, and Prime Television|Prime News New Zealand.

Merlin Mann – Podcasting

As a companion to 43 Folders, Mann launched the sporadically-published 43 Folders Podcast in 2005.

Merlin Mann – Podcasting

In 2007, Mann, Adam Lisagor, and Scott Simpson launched You Look Nice Today, a comedy podcast that bills itself as a journal of emotional hygiene. [http://www.43folders.com/2009/01/09/monthly-pimp-january-09-edition 43 Folders: The Monthly Pimp: January ’09 Edition]

Merlin Mann – Podcasting

Since January 18, 2011, he has co-hosted the weekly Back to Work podcast with Dan Benjamin on 5by5 Studios|5by5. They talk about subjects like productivity,[http://5by5.tv/b2w/2/ PIcture of a Boat] Back to Work, Merlin Mann and Dan Benjamin work life [http://5by5.tv/b2w/7/ Vocational Wheel Back to Work, Merlin Mann and Dan Benjamin] and true costs of doing business.[http://5by5.tv/b2w/52/ Walk the Coastline, Bitches Back To Work, Merlin Mann and Dan Benjamin]

Merlin Mann – Podcasting

In September 2011, Mann launched Roderick on the Line, a weekly conversation with musician/writer John Roderick (musician)|John Roderick.

Merlin Mann – Podcasting

Mann has also produced QPR: Quotidian Public Radio, an audio podcast launched in January 2009 that is billed as audio comfort food for annoyed liberals in fleece. Previously, Mann was one of the hosts on the MacBreak video podcast and a core host on the MacBreak|MacBreak Weekly audio podcast. Since 2008, he has scaled back his appearances on the series.

Merlin Mann – Podcasting

In the past, Mann appeared on other podcasts, including as the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation radio show/podcast Spark, The ProfHacker Podcast, Scruffy Thinking, CMD+SPACE and various episodes of Dan Benjamin’s The Conversation.[http://5by5.tv/people/merlin-mann The Conversation – Merlin Mann]

CBC.ca – Podcasting

In 2005, CBC began podcasting some of its programs as a pilot project, including CBC Radio One’s national science and technology program, Quirks and Quarks, CBC Radio Three|CBC Radio 3’s Canadian Music Podcast, and limited podcasting of CBLA-FM|CBLA’s popular Metro Morning show.

CBC.ca – Podcasting

In May 2006, CBC added several more podcasts, including Dispatches (radio program)|Dispatches, best-of editions of Outfront, As It Happens, Ideas (radio show)|Ideas, The Current (radio program)|The Current and Definitely Not the Opera, weekly podcasts from regional radio stations and Editor’s Choice, a daily showcase of notable network programming.

List of podcasting companies

This is a list of ‘ notable podcast production and distribution companies’. This includes both audio and video podcasts.

List of podcasting companies – List

* [http://www.feralaudio.com/ Feral Audio]

List of podcasting companies – List

* Generally Speaking Production Network

List of podcasting companies – List

* Jupiter Broadcasting

List of podcasting companies – List

* [http://netcaststudio.com/ NetCast Studio]

List of podcasting companies – List

* Public Radio International

Adam Curry – Podcasting

Curry founded PodShow, now Mevio, with his business partner Ron Bloom, in January 2005. PodShow is a podcast promotions and advertising company that encompasses the Podshow Podcast Network, the Podcast Delivery Network, and the Podsafe Music Network. Some of Podshow’s top podcasts are Curry’s own Daily Source Code, The Dawn and Drew Show, and GeekBrief.TV.

Adam Curry – Podcasting

From June 2005 to May 2007, Curry hosted a weekday evening show on Sirius Satellite Radio called ‘Adam Curry’s PodShow’.

Adam Curry – Podcasting

In late 2005 Curry was caught making anonymous edits to the Podcast Wikipedia page, deleting several sections concerning contributions made by fellow podcasting pioneers, Kevin Marks and Stephen Downes, while adding material that emphasized his own involvement with the development of the medium

Adam Curry – Podcasting

Since October 2007, he has hosted the twice-weekly podcast the No Agenda Show with John C. Dvorak, discussing recent news and media memes. The podcast does not accept any advertising and is solely supported by the listeners.

Adam Curry – Podcasting

Curry has heavily promoted his podcasting endeavors. He promoted his podcast Daily Source Code in Second Life under the name ‘Adam Neumann’, along with a Second Life island called Podshow Island. Curry used podcasting to endorse 2008 Republican Presidential hopeful Ron Paul. He also uses his show to discuss news topics and conspiracy theories such as Free energy suppressionDaily Source Code Episode 781, Confessions of a multimedia hitman and the 9/11 Truth Movement.

Adam Curry – Podcasting

Curry is widely credited for popularizing the podcast medium. As Annalee Newitz noted in Wired (magazine)|Wired, Every new medium needs a celebrity, and Curry is happy to fill that role.

Adam Curry – Podcasting

Adam Curry streams the live version of the No Agenda Podcast Thursday and Sunday at 12:00 PM ET.

History of podcasting

Podcasting, first known as audioblogging has its roots dating back to the 1980s. With the advent of broadband internet and Portable media player|portable digital audio playback devices such as the iPod, began to catch hold in late 2004. Today there are more than 115,000 English-language podcasts available on the internet, and dozens of websites available for distribution at little or no cost to the producer or listener.

History of podcasting – Precursors

Before the advent of the World Wide Web, in the 1980s, Radio Computing Services|RCS (Radio Computing Services), provided music and talk-related software to radio stations in a digital format

History of podcasting – Precursors

In 2001, Applian Technologies of San Francisco, California introduced Replay Radio (later renamed into Replay AV), a TiVo-like recorder for Internet Radio Shows

History of podcasting – Timeline

In September 2000, the first system that enabled the selection, automatic downloading and storage of serial episodic audio content on PCs and portable devices was launched http://www.mp3newswire.net/stories/2000/ego.html from early MP3 player manufacturer, i2Go

History of podcasting – Timeline

In October 2000, the concept of using enclosures in RSS feeds was proposed in a draft by Tristan Louis,Louis, Tristan, 2000-10-13

History of podcasting – Timeline

Winer included the new functionality in RSS 0.92Winer, Dave, 2000-12-25 [http://backend.userland.com/rss092 RSS 0.92 Specification] by defining a new elementWiner, Dave, 2000-12-27 Scripting News:[http://www.scripting.com/2000/12/27.html Heads-up, I’m working on new features for RSS that build on 0.91

History of podcasting – Timeline

Since Radio Userland had a built-in aggregator, it provided both the send and receive components of what was then called audioblogging.Curry, Adam, 2002-10-21 UserNum 1014: [http://radio.weblogs.com/0001014/2002/10/21.html#a2427 Cool to hear my own audio-blog…]Gilchrist, Harold 2002-10-27 Audioblog/Mobileblogging News [http://radio.weblogs.com/0100368/2002/10/27.html this morning I’m experimenting with producing an audioblogging show…] All that was needed for podcasting was a way to automatically move audio files from Radio Userland’s download folder to an audio player (either software or hardware) — along with enough compelling audio to make such automation worth the trouble.

History of podcasting – Timeline

In June, 2003, Stephen Downes demonstrated aggregation and syndication of audio files in his Ed Radio application.Downes, Stephen, June, 2003 [http://www.downes.ca/ed_radio.htm Ed Radio] Ed Radio scanned RSS feeds for MP3 files, collected them into a single feed, and made the result available as Synchronized Multimedia Integration Language|SMIL or Webjay audio feeds.

History of podcasting – Timeline

In September, 2003, Winer created a special RSS-with-enclosures feed for his Harvard Law School|Harvard Berkman Center colleague Christopher Lydon’s weblog, which previously had a text-only RSS feed

History of podcasting – Timeline

Not long after, Pete Prodoehl released a skin for the Amphetadesk aggregator that displayed enclosure links.Prodoehl, Peter, 2003-09-24 RasterWeb: [http://rasterweb.net/raster/2003/09/24/20030924083605/ Enclose This!] Doug Kaye, who had been publishing MP3 recordings of his interviews at [http://itc.conversationsnetwork.org IT Conversations] since June, created an RSS feed with enclosures.Kaye, Doug, 2003-09-24 [http://www.rds.com/doug/weblogs/2003/09/24.html Blogarithms] ‘IT Conversations.’ Lydon’s blog eventually became [http://www.radioopensource.org Radio Open Source] and is now the oldest, still-running podcast.

History of podcasting – Timeline

[http://grumet.net/weblog/archives/2005/04/26/a_slice_of_podcasting_history.html A slice of podcasting history]

History of podcasting – Timeline

Although AudioFeast did not refer to itself as a podcasting service and was not built on RSS, it provided a way of downloading episodic audio content through desktop software and portable devices, with a system simililar to the [http://web.archive.org/web/20001203235700/www.myaudio2go.com/asp/help_programs.asp MyAudio2Go.com] service four years before it

History of podcasting – Timeline

Seven months later, Dannie Gregoire used the term podcasting to describe the automatic downloadGregoire, Dannie J

History of podcasting – Timeline

Also in September, Adam Curry launched a mailing list, then Slashdot had a 100+ message discussion, bringing even more attention to the podcasting developer projects in progress.

History of podcasting – Timeline

Doc Searls’ IT Garage, [http://www.itgarage.com/node/462 DIY Radio with PODcasting.] On September 28, 2004, there were 526 hits on Google’s search engine for the word podcasts

History of podcasting – Timeline

October 11, 2004 Capturing the early distribution and variety of podcasts was more difficult than counting Google hits, but before the end of October, The New York Times had reported podcasts across the United States and in Canada, Australia and Sweden, mentioning podcast topics from technology to veganism to movie reviews.

History of podcasting – Timeline

USA Today told its readers about the free amateur chatfests the following February, profiling several podcasters, giving instructions for sending and receiving podcasts, and including a Top Ten list from one of the many podcast directories that had sprung up

History of podcasting – Timeline

In November 2004, podcasting networks started to appear on the scene with podcasters affiliating with one another

History of podcasting – Timeline

In June, 2005, Apple Inc.|Apple added podcasting to its iTunes 4.9 music software and building a directory of podcasts at its iTunes Music Store.[http://www.apple.com/pr/library/2005/jun/28podcast.html Apple Takes Podcasting Mainstream] Apple Press Info[http://www.engadget.com/2005/06/28/itunes-4-9-with-podcasting-available-for-download-still-no/ iTunes 4.9 with podcasting available for download — still no formal announcement] Engadget The new iTunes could subscribe to, download and organize podcasts, which made a separate aggregator application unnecessary for many users

History of podcasting – Timeline

In November, 2005, the first Portable Media Expo and Podcasting Conference was held at the Ontario Convention Center in Ontario, California|Ontario, California

History of podcasting – Timeline

In February, 2006, following London radio station LBC’s successful launch of the first premium-podcasting platform LBC Plus, there was widespread acceptance that podcasting had considerable commercial potential

History of podcasting – Timeline

Dave Winer, the co-inventor of podcasting (with Adam Curry), points out that his invention predated this patent by two years.[http://www.scripting.com/stories/2009/07/29/didVolomediaInventPodcasti.html Did VoloMedia invent Podcasting?]

History of podcasting – Timeline

In March 2007 after being On Air talent and being fired from [http://www.987fm.com/ KYSR](STAR) in Los Angeles, Ca

History of podcasting – Timeline

The Adam Carolla Show (podcast)|The Adam Carolla Show started as a regular weekday podcast in March 2009 and by March 2011, 59.6 million podcasts had been downloaded, breaking Ricky Gervais previous world record. The BBC noted in 2011 that more people (eight million in the UK or about 16% of the population, with half listening at least once a week – a similar proportion to the USA) had downloaded podcasts than used Twitter.

History of podcasting – Timeline

With a run of eight years (as of October 2013), the various podcasts provided by [http://www.wrestlingobserver.com Wrestling Observer/Figure Four Online], including Figure Four Daily and the Bryan and Vinny Show with host Bryan Alvarez, and Wrestling Observer Radio with hosts Alvarez and Dave Meltzer, have produced over 6,000 monetized podcasts at a subscription rate of $10.99 per month

History of podcasting – Popularization

[http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue10_9/crofts/ Podcasting: A new technology in search of viable business models]

History of podcasting – Popularization

The growing popularity of podcasting introduced a demand for music available for use on the shows without significant cost or licensing difficulty. Out of this demand, a growing number of tracks, by independent as well as signed acts, are now being designated podsafe. (See also Podcasting and Music Royalties.)

History of podcasting – Popularization

One of the first examples of a print publication to produce an audio podcast to supplement their printed content was the international scientific journal Nature. The Nature Podcast was set up in October 2005 by University of Cambridge|Cambridge University’s award-winning The Naked Scientists|Naked Scientist, [http://www.thenakedscientists.com/html/background/chrisCV.htm Chris Smith], who produces and presents the weekly show.

History of podcasting – Coping with growth

While podcasting’s innovators took advantage of the sound-file synchronization feature of Apple Inc.’s iPod and iTunes software—and included pod in the name—the technology was always compatible with other players and programs

History of podcasting – Coping with growth

When it added a podcast-subscription feature to its June 28, 2005, release of iTunes 4.9, Apple also launched a directory of podcasts at the iTunes Music Store, starting with 3,000 entries

Kevin Rose – Podcasting

Rose began podcasting on July 24, 2003, with the release of the first episode of thebroken while he was still working on The Screen Savers at TechTV

Kevin Rose – Podcasting

In November 2008, Rose was forced to apologize after making a crude joke about cutting off women’s breasts on a video podcast. He said:

Kevin Rose – Podcasting

…there is only one time you can strike [a woman ] if she kicks you in the balls, you have the ability and the right, to punch her in the teat…it’s just like that…it’s kinda like tit for tat. It hurts them, it does too…or take a scissors to the teat [Rose then made a cutting action with his hand]Editors (November 8, 2008) [http://readwrite.com/2008/11/24/kevin_rose_apologizes_for_sexi#awesm=~oAIF3bOgUXLoSq “Kevin Rose Apologizes for Sexist Joke on Diggnation.”] Read/Write. (Retrieved 4-6-2014.)

Kevin Rose – Podcasting

Starting in 2009, Rose started an intermittent podcast called The Random Show with friend Timothy Ferriss|Tim Ferriss. As of August 2014, the show has a total of 24 episodes.

The Pentagon Channel – Podcasting

In April 2006, the Pentagon Channel launched its podcasting initiative. Currently the Pentagon Channel offers 27 podcasts via the iTunes Store and its website.

LBC Radio – Podcasting

LBC claim to be the first radio station in the world to provide full-length podcasts for all its major shows, plus podcast-only shows and other things such as backstage interviews and mp3s sent to the show, under the name LBC Plus. Most podcasts require a small subscription fee, but some shows, including Best Of programmes, podcast only shows and ‘bitesize’ versions of programmes, are free.

Adam Scott (actor) – Podcasting

Scott is the co-host and co-creator of the podcast U Talkin’ U2 To Me? with Scott Aukerman.http://www.earwolf.com/show/u-talkin-u2-to-me/ Though the series is introduced at the outset of each episode as the comprehensive and encyclopedic compendium of all things U2, it is in fact largely devoted to conversations and anecdotes that have nothing to do with the Irish rock band

Adam Scott (actor) – Podcasting

Scott has been a guest on numerous podcasts, including Comedy Bang Bang, How Did This Get Made?, and Who Charted.http://www.earwolf.com/person/adam-scott/

Rob Cesternino – Podcasting

Cesternino manages his own website entitled Rob Has A Website, which is the home of his popular podcast series Rob Has A Podcast (RHAP), which he co-hosts with Nicole and other guest-hosts

Rob Cesternino – Podcasting

In late 2013 Rob launched a new podcast and website called Post Show Recaps where he covers scripted shows with RHAP being left for Reality TV coverage

They Might Be Giants – Podcasting, independent releases, and children’s music (2004–present)

In 2004, the band created one of the first artist-owned online music stores, at which customers could purchase and download MP3 copies of their music, both new releases and many previously released albums. By creating their own store, the band could keep money that would otherwise go to record companies. With the redesign of the band’s website in 2010, the store was reincarnated.

They Might Be Giants – Podcasting, independent releases, and children’s music (2004–present)

Also in 2004, the band released their first new adult rock work since the release of No!, the EP Indestructible Object

They Might Be Giants – Podcasting, independent releases, and children’s music (2004–present)

TMBG also contributed a track to the 2004 Future Soundtrack For America compilation, a project compiled by John Flansburgh with the help of Spike Jonze and Barsuk Records

They Might Be Giants – Podcasting, independent releases, and children’s music (2004–present)

Flansburgh and Linnell made a guest appearance in List of Home Movies episodes#Season 4: 2003–2004|Camp, the January 11, 2004 episode of the animated situation comedy|sitcom Home Movies (cartoon series)|Home Movies

They Might Be Giants – Podcasting, independent releases, and children’s music (2004–present)

Following the Spine on the Hiway Tour of 2004, the band announced that they would take an extended hiatus from touring to focus on other projects, such as a musical produced by Flansburgh and written by his wife, Robin Goldwasser|Robin Goldie Goldwasser, titled People Are Wrong!.

They Might Be Giants – Podcasting, independent releases, and children’s music (2004–present)

2005 saw the release of Here Come the ABCs, TMBG’s follow-up to the successful children’s album No!

They Might Be Giants – Podcasting, independent releases, and children’s music (2004–present)

Since December 2005, They Might Be Giants have been making podcasts on a monthly, sometimes bi-monthly, basis. Each edition includes remixes of previous songs, rarities, covers, and new songs and skits recorded specifically for the podcast.

They Might Be Giants – Podcasting, independent releases, and children’s music (2004–present)

The band contributed 14 original songs for the 2006 Dunkin’ Donuts ad campaign, America Runs on Dunkin’, including Things I Like to Do, Pleather and Fritalian. In the aired advertisement, Flansburgh sings Fritalian along with his wife, Robin Goldwasser. In a 2008 commercial, Moving is played.

They Might Be Giants – Podcasting, independent releases, and children’s music (2004–present)

The band have produced and performed three original songs for Playhouse Disney series: one for Higglytown Heroes and two for Mickey Mouse Clubhouse

They Might Be Giants – Podcasting, independent releases, and children’s music (2004–present)

They also recorded a cover of the The Walt Disney Company|Disney song, There’s a Great Big Beautiful Tomorrow for the movie Meet the Robinsons and wrote and performed the theme song for The Drinky Crow Show

They Might Be Giants – Podcasting, independent releases, and children’s music (2004–present)

Their 12th album, The Else, was released July 10, 2007, on Idlewild Recordings (and distributed by Zoë Records for the CD version), with an earlier digital release on May 15 at the iTunes Store

They Might Be Giants – Podcasting, independent releases, and children’s music (2004–present)

In the rest of 2007, They Might Be Giants wrote a commissioned piece for Brooklyn-based robotic music outfit League of Electronic Musical Urban Robots and performed for three dates at the event, and covered the Pixies Havalina for American Laundromat Records Dig For Fire – a tribute to PIXIES compilation.

They Might Be Giants – Podcasting, independent releases, and children’s music (2004–present)

The band’s 14th album was Here Comes Science, a science-themed children’s album. This album introduced listeners to Outline of science#Natural sciences|natural, Outline of science#Formal sciences|formal, Outline of science#Social sciences|social and Outline of science#Applied sciences|applied sciences. It was released on September 1, 2009 and nominated for a 53rd Grammy Awards|Grammy Award on December 1, 2010.

They Might Be Giants – Podcasting, independent releases, and children’s music (2004–present)

On November 3, They Might Be Giants sent out a newsletter stating The Avatars of They, a set of sock puppets the Johns manipulate for shows, will have an album in 2012, suggesting another children’s album. However, a new adult album titled Join Us was released on July 19, 2011.

They Might Be Giants – Podcasting, independent releases, and children’s music (2004–present)

On October 3, 2011 Artix Entertainment announced that the band would be performing in-game for a special musical event to commemorate the 3rd birthday of their popular MMORPG AdventureQuest Worlds. They were featured in AdventureQuest World’s special third birthday event as John and John.

They Might Be Giants – Podcasting, independent releases, and children’s music (2004–present)

On March 5, 2013, the band released their sixteenth adult studio album, Nanobots, on their Idlewild Recordings label in the US and on British indie label Lojinx in Europe.

Pamela L. Gay – Podcasting

Gay co-hosts the Astronomy Cast podcast, an educational program which debuted in September 2006, with Fraser Cain. The show covers a variety of topics, including the solar system, cosmology, black holes, and misconceptions about astronomy, and attempts to share not only what we know, but how we know what we know, according to Cain.

Pamela L. Gay – Podcasting

Gay was one of the cofounders of Slacker Astronomy, and was an on air personality for the show from February 2005 until the end of its first iteration in September 2006.

Pamela L. Gay – Podcasting

In 2008, Gay initiated brainstorming via e-mail on possible new media programs for 2009, the International Year of Astronomy (IYA). The discussion included Michael Koppelman from Slacker Astronomy, Phil Plait of Bad Astronomy, and others involved in the IYA, and resulted in the 365 Days Of Astronomy podcast. The podcast was to publish one episode per day over the entire year of 2009 and was originally planned to only run for that year.

Pamela L. Gay – Podcasting

Since 2009, Gay has been a judge for the Parsec Awards, a set of annual awards created to recognize excellence in science fiction podcasts and podcast novels.

WGBH-TV – Podcasting

* [http://www.wgbh.org/morningstories Morning Stories] – Public radio’s first podcast directed and produced by Tony Kahn for WGBH 89.7 and WGBH.org.

Logo TV – Podcasting

Logo offered several audio and video podcasts through the podcast section of the iTunes Store. At launch, the offering included audio and video podcasts for CBS News on Logo, Jason Bellini’s Here Now, Talking to Manatees, She Said What? and Wisecrack. July 28, 2007, Logo launched a new audio podcast titled Oh God I’m Gay, which addresses spiritual issues for LGBT people. As of January 2011, archives of some of Logo’s podcasts remain on iTunes but none have been updated since 2009.

Juice (podcasting)

‘Juice’ is a podcast news aggregator|aggregator for Microsoft Windows|Windows and Mac OS X used for downloading media files such as ogg and mp3 for playback on the computer or for copying to a digital audio player

Juice (podcasting)

Initially it was not clear that podcasting would be completely tied to RSS

Juice (podcasting) – Development

The program is written in Python and, through use of a cross-platform UI library, runs on Mac OS X and Microsoft Windows 2000 or Windows XP. A Linux variant has not been developed.

Juice (podcasting) – Development

The 2004 growth of podcasting inspired other podcatching programs, such as jPodder, as well as the June 2005 addition of a podcast subscription feature in Apple’s iTunes music player. This development quickly put an end to the popularity of the Juice application.

Juice (podcasting) – Development

In 2006 the team effectively stopped further development of the program, the developers started working in other fields, some Podcasting related

Juice (podcasting) – Forks

There have been several Fork (software development)|forks of Juice:

Juice (podcasting) – Forks

* PodNova, which was available on Windows, Mac OS X and Linux, but closed at the end of February 2010.

T. J. Miller – Podcasting

*Miller started appearing on Chicago-based comedy Podcast Red Bar Radio in 2006 as a semi-regular cohost.

T. J. Miller – Podcasting

*He is also a frequent guest on Doug Benson|Doug Benson’s podcast Doug Loves Movies.

Live from the Tabernacle – Podcasting

‘The Joe Rogan Experience’ (JRE) is a philosophy, Psychedelic experience|psychedelics, sports, and comedy podcast hosted by Joe Rogan, produced and co-hosted by Brian Redban.[http://podcasts.joerogan.net/ Joe Rogan Podcast] The first episode was streamed live on December 24, 2009

Andrew Mayne – Podcasting

*Weird Things – The Podcast Co-hosted with Brian Brushwood and Justin Robert Young

Andrew Mayne – Podcasting

*The Amazing Show starring James Randi Executive-producer

Andrew Mayne – Podcasting

*The Official Criss Angel Podcast Executive-producer

Andrew Mayne – Podcasting

*Current Geek 06: Flapping the Bird with Scott Johnson, Justin Robert Young, and Tom Merritt Guest Co-Host

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