The ITIL Certification Management Board (ICMB) manages ITIL certification

ITIL The ITIL Certification Management Board (ICMB) manages ITIL certification

Other Frameworks ITIL is generally equivalent to the scope of the ISO/IEC 20000 standard (previously BS 15000).[25] .

While it is not possible for an organization to be certified as being ITIL compliant, certification of an organisation is available for ISO20000 [26].

COBIT is an IT governance framework and supporting toolset developed by ISACA.

ISACA view ITIL as being complimentory to COBIT.

They see COBIT as providing a governance and assurance role while ITIL providing guidance for service management.[27] The enhanced Telecom Operations Map eTOM published by the TeleManagement Forum offers a framework aimed at telecommunications service providers.

In a joined effort, TM Forum and itSMF developed an Application Note to eTOM (GB921) that shows how the two frameworks can be mapped to each other.

It addresses how eTom process elements and flows can be used to support the processes identified in ITIL.[28] [29] IBM Tivoli Unified Process (ITUP) is aligned with ITIL, but is presented as a complete, integrated process model compatible with IBM’s products.

Information Technology Infrastructure Library 21 Certification Individuals The certification scheme differs between ITIL v2 and ITIL v3 and bridge examinations let v2 certification owners transfer to the new program.

ITIL v2 offers 3 certification levels: Foundation, Practitioner and Manager.

These should be progressively discontinued in favour of the new ITIL v3 scheme.

ITIL v3 certification levels are: Foundation, Intermediate, Expert and Master.

The ITIL v3 certification scheme offers a modular approach.

Each qualification is assigned a credit value; so that upon successful completion of the module, the candidate is rewarded with both a certification and a number of credits.

At the lowest level – Foundation candidates are awarded a certification and 2 credits.

At the Intermediate level, a total of 15 credits must be earned.

These credits may be accumulated in either a “Lifecycle” stream or a “Capability” stream; or combination thereof.

Each Lifecycle module and exam is 3 An ITIL Foundation certificate pin.


Each Capability module and corresponding exam is 4 credits.

A candidate wanting to achieve the Expert level will have, among other requirements, to gain the required number of credits (22).

That is accomplished with two from Foundations, then 15 from Intermediate, and finally 5 credits from the “Managing Across the Lifecycle” exam.

Together, the total of 22 earned credits designates one as ITIL v.

3 Expert.

The ITIL Certification Management Board (ICMB) manages ITIL certification.

The Board includes representatives from interested parties within the community around the world.

Members of the Board include (though are not limited to) representatives from the UK Office of Government Commerce (OGC), APM Group (APMG), The Stationery Office (TSO), V3 Examination Panel, Examination Institutes (EIs) and the IT Service Management [30] Forum International (itSMF) as the recognised user group.

Since the early 1990s, EXIN and ISEB have been setting up the ITIL based certification program, developing and providing ITIL exams at three different levels: Foundation, Practitioner and Manager.

EXIN[31] and BCS/ISEB[32] (the British Computer Society) have from that time onwards been the only two examination providers in the world to develop formally acknowledged ITIL certifications, provide ITIL exams and accredit ITIL training providers worldwide.

These rights were obtained from OGC, the British government institution and owner of the ITIL trademark.

OGC signed over the management of the ITIL trademark and the accreditation of examination providers to APMG in 2006.

Now, after signing a contract with EXIN[31] , BCS/ISEB and other certification bodies, including PEOPLECERT Group [33], APMG is accrediting them as official examination bodies, to offer ITIL exams and accredit ITIL training providers.

On July 20, 2006, the OGC signed a contract with the APM Group [34] to become its commercial partner for ITIL accreditation from January 1, 2007.[35] APMG manage the ITIL Version 3 exams.

APMG maintains a voluntary register of ITIL Version 3-certified practitioners at their Successful Candidate Register.[36] A voluntary registry of ITIL Version 2-certified practitioners is operated by the ITIL Certification Register.[37] Information Technology Infrastructure Library 22 ITIL® pins It has been a well-known tradition for years that passing an EXIN exam in IT Service Management (based on ITIL®) does not only result in a certificate, but is also accompanied by the presentation of a metal pin which can be attached to a shirt or jacket.

This distinguishing badge with basic gold colour is set in the form of the internationally well-known ITIL®-logo.

The ITIL® pins consist of small diamond like structure that is accepted worldwide.

The meaning and the shape of the diamond depicts coherence in the IT industry (infrastructure as well).

The four corners of the pin symbolises service support, service delivery, Infrastructure Management and IT Management.

There are three colours of ITIL® V2 pins: 1.

green, for the Foundation Certificate 2.

blue, for the Practitioner’s Certificate 3.

red, for the Manager’s Certificate Exam candidates who have successfully passed the examinations for ITIL® version 2 will receive their appropriate pin from EXIN, PEOPLECERT Group or their certification provider, their EXIN, PEOPLECERT Group or their certification provider regional office, or an EXIN,PEOPLECERT Group or certification agent.

With the arrival of ITIL® V3, there are several new pins to display your achievements.

As of July 2008, EXIN and all certification providers such as PEOPLECERT Group will also provide ITIL® pins to exam candidates who have obtained ITIL® version 3 certificates.

The new pins are very similar to ITIL® V2 pins, but every level has a different color corresponding to the ITIL® V3 core books.

Organisations Organisations and management systems cannot claim certification as “ITIL-compliant”.

An organisation that has implemented ITIL guidance in IT Service Management (ITSM), may however, be able to achieve compliance with and seek certification under ISO/IEC 20000.

Note that there are some significant differences between ISO/IEC20000 and ITIL Version 3[38] • ISO20000 only recognises the management of financial assets, not assets which include “management, organisation, process, knowledge, people, information, applications, infrastructure and financial capital”, nor the concept of a “service asset”.

So ISO20000 certification does not address the management of ‘assets’ in an ITIL sense.

• ISO20000 does not recognise Configuration Management System (CMS) or Service Knowledge Management System (SKMS), and so does not certify anything beyond Configuration Management Database (CMDB).

• An organisation can obtain ISO20000 certification without recognising or implementing the ITIL concept of Known Error, which is usually considered essential to ITIL.

References [1] David Clifford, Jan van Bon (2008).

Implementing ISO/IEC 20000 Certification: The Roadmap.

ITSM Library.

Van Haren Publishing.

ISBN 908753082X.

[2] Office of Government Commerce (UK) CCTA and OGC (http:/ / www.



uk/ index.


Retrieved May 5, 2005.

[3] Office of Government Commerce (UK) (http:/ / www.



uk/ guidance_itil.


Retrieved August 19, 2009.

[4] Office of Government Commerce (2000).

Service Support.

The Stationery Office.

ISBN 0113300158.

[5] Office of Government Commerce (2001).

Service Delivery.

IT Infrastructure Library.

The Stationery Office.

ISBN 0113300174.

[6] Office of Government Commerce (2002).

ICT Infrastructure Management.

The Stationery Office.

ISBN 0113308655.

[7] Cazemier, Jacques A.; Overbeek, Paul L.; Peters, Louk M.


Security Management.

The Stationery Office.

ISBN 011330014X.

[8] Office of Government Commerce (2002).

Application Management.

The Stationery Office.

ISBN 0113308663.

[9] Office of Government Commerce (2002).

Planning to Implement Service Management.

The Stationery Office.

ISBN 0113308779.

[10] Office of Government Commerce (2005).

ITIL Small Scale Implementation.

The Stationery Office.

ISBN 0113309805.

[11] http:/ / www.



uk/ itil_ogc_withdrawal_of_itil_version2.

asp [12] Majid Iqbal and Michael Nieves (2007).

ITIL Service Strategy.

The Stationery Office.

ISBN 9780113310456.

[13] Vernon Lloyd and Colin Rudd (2007).

ITIL Service Design.

The Stationery Office.

ISBN 9780113310470.

Information Technology Infrastructure Library

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