ITIL1 WHAT IS ITIL®?

WORK VALUES…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………50 REWARD SYSTEMS …………………………………………………………………………………………………………….51 PAY OPTIONS FOR TEAMS ……………………………………………………………………………………………………53 QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS: OVERCOMING EVALUATION DIFFICULTIES………………………………………………..54 CONDUCTING EFFECTIVE PERFORMANCE REVIEWS …………………………………………………………. 56 6.1 6.2 6.3 6.4 6.5 6.6 6.7 6.8 6.9 HISTORY OF PERFORMANCE APPRAISALS …………………………………………………………………………………..56 EMPLOYEES’ CONCERNS ABOUT PAS ……………………………………………………………………………………….57 WHAT MAKES PAS A DEFENSIBLE PROCESS? ……………………………………………………………………………..59 STEREOTYPES …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..60 THE PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT PROCESS …………………………………………………………………………….61 KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATORS (KPIS) ……………………………………………………………………………………62 SMART KPIS ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….63 KPI COMPONENTS …………………………………………………………………………………………………………….63 CREATING KPIS ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..65 7 STAFF RETENTION………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 66 7.1 7.2 7.3 7.4 7.5 7.6 WHERE TO BEGIN?……………………………………………………………………………………………………………66 WHAT’S NEXT?………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..67 IS IT ALL ABOUT THE MONEY? ……………………………………………………………………………………………….68 COMPENSATION/INCENTIVES ………………………………………………………………………………………………..69 DO YOU WANT TO KNOW? …………………………………………………………………………………………………70 FEEDBACK ON-LINE …………………………………………………………………………………………………………..72 8 IT SERVICE MANAGEMENT ………………………………………………………………………………………….. 75 8.1 WHAT IS ITIL®? ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………….76 8 Copyright The Art of Service ?Brisbane, Australia?Email:[email protected] Web: http://store.theartofservice.com ?eLearning: http://theartofservice.org ?Phone: +61 (0)7 3252 2055 8.1.1 9 Good practices …………………………………………………………………………………………………….77 THE SERVICE LIFECYCLE ……………………………………………………………………………………………….. 78 9.1 9.2 MAPPING THE CONCEPTS OF ITIL® TO THE SERVICE LIFECYCLE …………………………………………………………79 HOW DOES THE SERVICE LIFECYCLE WORK? ……………………………………………………………………………….80 10 SERVICE DELIVERY PRINCIPLES …………………………………………………………………………………….. 82 10.1 WHAT ARE SERVICES? ……………………………………………………………………………………………………82 Creating Service Value ………………………………………………………………………………………83 10.1.1 10.2 FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT……………………………………………………………………………………………….85 Goal and objectives ………………………………………………………………………………………….86 Benefits ………………………………………………………………………………………………………….86 Financial Management Activities ……………………………………………………………………….88 Funding and charging ………………………………………………………………………………………90 Chargeback …………………………………………………………………………………………………….91 10.2.1 10.2.2 10.2.3 10.2.4 10.2.5 10.3 DEMAND MANAGEMENT ………………………………………………………………………………………………..93 Goal and objectives ………………………………………………………………………………………….94 10.3.1 11 — Incident Management Activities …………………………………………………………………….. 110 KPIs of Incident Management ………………………………………………………………………… 124 REQUEST FULFILLMENT ……………………………………………………………………………………………….. 125 Goal ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 125 Scope ………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 125 Request Models ……………………………………………………………………………………………. 126 Activities ……………………………………………………………………………………………………… 126 12.2.1 12.2.2 12.2.3 12.2.4 13 SELECTING / CONFIGURING HELP DESK TOOLS ……………………………………………………………… 128 13.1 13.2 13.3 13.4 COMMON FEATURES ACROSS MOST HELP DESK TOOLS …………………………………………………………… 129 ADDITIONAL OR CUSTOM FEATURES…………………………………………………………………………………. 129 SELECTION PROCESS FOR HELP DESK TOOLS ……………………………………………………………………….. 130 INTEGRATION OF KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT PRACTICES ………………………………………………………. 131 Communities ……………………………………………………………………………………………….. 131 Collaboration ……………………………………………………………………………………………….. 132 Workflow Management ………………………………………………………………………………… 132 13.4.1 13.4.2 13.4.3 14 15 16 17 REVIEW QUESTIONS …………………………………………………………………………………………………. 134 ANSWERS TO REVIEW QUESTIONS ……………………………………………………………………………… 139 HELP DESK GLOSSARY ……………………………………………………………………………………………….. 143 INDUSTRY CERTIFICATIONS ……………………………………………………………………………………….. 153 17.1 17.2 17.3 ITIL® CERTIFICATION PATHWAYS ……………………………………………………………………………………. 153 ISO/IEC 20000 PATHWAYS ………………………………………………………………………………………… 154 CLOUD COMPUTING …………………………………………………………………………………………………… 155 18 INDEX …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 157 10 Copyright The Art of Service ?Brisbane, Australia?Email:[email protected] Web: http://store.theartofservice.com ?eLearning: http://theartofservice.org ?Phone: +61 (0)7 3252 2055 1 Introduction Help Desk Managers are faced with a multitude of tasks and decisions in any given day.

Ensuring processes are being followed, customers are being taken care of, issues being addressed and staff being as productive as possible are just some examples.

With all these actions taking place, it is easy to make mistakes and lose valuable time, resources, productivity and subsequently business revenue.

Therefore, it is important to recognize what skills are required of a Help Desk Manager in order to create and maintain a high performing team.

This book and elearning program has been designed to provide explanation of these required skills, as well as to support the reader in developing their own capabilities in these areas.

As a prelude to the areas covered in this book, the following is a list of common mistakes made by Help Desk Managers.

Consider whether you have fallen prey to any of these: (Not listed in any particular order) ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? Not communicating enough/effectively with other departments or organizations Ignoring metrics Paying too much attention to metrics Not delegating enough responsibility to team members Inefficient utilization of available resources (EG supplier representatives) Not building/maintaining the right skillsets or team members Being too reactive, leaving no time for proactive work Failing to keep team members motivated Not giving enough focus to customers Spending too much time in meetings 11 Copyright The Art of Service ?Brisbane, Australia?Email:[email protected] Web: http://store.theartofservice.com ?eLearning: http://theartofservice.org ?Phone: +61 (0)7 3252 2055 1.1 Responsibilities of a Help Desk Manager — Contribute to the development of new support service contracts.

Participate in customer relationship management.

Grow and enhance existing culture. If you have experience in IT customer service management or team leadership and are looking to join a dynamic and successful IT Systems Integrator, then we want to hear from you. 1.2.2 Example 2 Help Desk Manager The role is responsible for the strategic and operational running of the Level 1 and Level 2 Help Desk at Company X.

Key to the above is managing the relationships with all Company X Agreement customers as well as partnering with associated business units to ensure agreed Service Levels are consistently realized.

The role is required to: ? ? ? ? Have a comprehensive knowledge of the operation of a Help Desk Ensure the cost-effective management of Help Desk people, process and technology including managing the Service Level Agreement (SLA) performance of these areas Develop, implement, monitor and review standard processes and procedures to continually improve the service provided by the Help Desk people Coach and develop the Help Desk people, improving their skills and talents through mentoring, coaching and training.

This includes delegation, development and empowering providing the capacity to accomplish tasks effectively ? Undertake trend analysis activities, interpret data and produce meaningful management information which enables accurate operational decision making and assists to devise innovative business improvements 14 Copyright The Art of Service ?Brisbane, Australia?Email:[email protected] Web: http://store.theartofservice.com ?eLearning: http://theartofservice.org ?Phone: +61 (0)7 3252 2055 This role requires a strong customer service focus working in a team environment.

The person must demonstrate well developed interpersonal and communication skills to establish effective customer relationship management techniques within a service team.

Formal Education: ? ? ? ? IT Degree or Diploma – preferred ITIL Foundations Certificate – well regarded HDAA/HDI Certification – well regarded Microsoft Certification – well regarded Work Experience: ? ? ? Worked successfully as a Help Desk Manager or Help Desk Team Leader for at least 2 years Worked successfully in a Senior IT Support role for at least 3 years Worked successfully within an IT environment that uses the ITIL framework and/or adheres to the HDAA/HDI certification process. 15 Copyright The Art of Service ?Brisbane, Australia?Email:[email protected] Web: http://store.theartofservice.com ?eLearning: http://theartofservice.org ?Phone: +61 (0)7 3252 2055 2 Hiring the right staff In 1919, Alfred Binet, the father of intelligence testing, first tried interviews as a means of assessing the capabilities of candidates.

He had three schoolteachers test the same five children to assess their intelligence.

When Binet asked the teachers whether they were confident of their assessments, they responded that they were.

There was only one problem: they disagreed widely about the students‘ intelligence levels.

Binet then abandoned the interview in favor of more rigorous testing.

During World War II, large-scale decisions had to be made about who to put where.

The timehonored military solution of saying, ?Hey you, go there? did not work any longer.

When the same applicants were interviewed by several classification officers, they could not agree on where the applicant ranked.

In one case, an applicant was ranked first by one officer and fiftyseventh by another.

When several interviewers cannot agree on ranking, we have to assume that some of them err in judgment.

Admiral Rickenbacker had a number of interesting little tests for applicants, and it was because of him that the stress interview became popular.

He would have the interviewee‘s chair nailed to the floor, and then watch the applicant try to obey his command to move the chair a little closer.

After the interview was over, he would direct them to the door – only, the door opened into a closet.

Once again, he would evaluate their reaction.

Of course we know today that stress interviews really only tell us how a candidate would react under a certain kind of stress, not how proficient they are in their day-to-day work performance.

As early as 1942, intelligence testers advocated using a structured set of interview questions so that each candidate is compared on the same ground.

However, the traditional let‘s see what happens type of interview kept coming to the fore, even though it had a terrible accuracy rating of anywhere from 14% to about 50% .

Over the years, structured interviews have been gaining more favor with organizations.

Structure improves accuracy and validity and makes the selection process more defensible. 16 Copyright The Art of Service ?Brisbane, Australia?Email:[email protected] Web: http://store.theartofservice.com ?eLearning: http://theartofservice.org ?Phone: +61 (0)7 3252 2055 It is important to note that today‘s research indicates that structured interviews, based on job requirements, that combine competency based questions, behavioral type questions and critical incidents, give organizations an accuracy rating that is far, far higher than ever before.

We know that the structured interview, where every candidate has the opportunity to answer the same questions, is more objective and justifiable.

We recognize the validity of behavior based questions because the best predictor of future performance quantified past performance.

Well-prepared critical incidents (stories of real events that ask for specific behaviors) identify performance behaviors and have about an 85% accuracy rating.

However, interviewing is not a science.

Our job is to eliminate as many opportunities for error as possible.

Clearly identify what the job entails, follow a structured format for interviewing, and combine the interview with other testing for the best shot at getting a good candidate.

There are six stages to the recruitment and selection process. 17 Copyright The Art of Service ?Brisbane, Australia?Email:[email protected] Web: http://store.theartofservice.com ?eLearning: http://theartofservice.org ?Phone: +61 (0)7 3252 2055 — 73 Copyright The Art of Service ?Brisbane, Australia?Email:[email protected] Web: http://store.theartofservice.com ?eLearning: http://theartofservice.org ?Phone: +61 (0)7 3252 2055 2.

New Starter Feedback – used increasingly to solicit feedback from new staff within four weeks of starting, a ‘new starter feedback’ survey typically probes the staff member’s perceptions of the effectiveness of the recruitment and induction process and seeks their ideas for improvement. 3.

Staff Referrals To Assist Hiring Efforts – with a growing number of employers realizing the significance of soliciting staff referrals from their current employees, online surveys and automated ‘Career Enquiry’ invitations are becoming popular.

A strong, highly skilled workforce built by peer referrals = happier staff = better staff retention. 4.

Remote Exit Interviews – in some circumstances, such as the sudden or unexpected departure of an employee, conducting face-to-face exit interviews can be difficult to arrange.

Utilizing an online survey format for these situations can often yield good response rates and result in honest and well considered feedback to assist in improving employment practices. 5.

Recruitment Process Feedback – most organizations serious about improving their recruitment efforts will have some sort of post-placement feedback process in place.

The sending of a short post-placement survey to a hiring Manager within a week or two of the appointment being made is an effective use of the online format. 6.

Training Needs Analysis – planning your training budget for the year ahead? Need to know what training opportunities staff most want and value? Then the online forum is perfect for collecting this sort of information from all employees in a timely manner. 7.

Post-training Feedback Or Quizzes – if you’re unsure of how much your staff value your company’s significant investment in external training sessions, then conducting post-training surveys can be a valuable exercise.

Alternatively, if you want to test your staff’s knowledge of a certain subject after they have attended an internal training session, then a short post-training quiz is a great idea. 74 Copyright The Art of Service ?Brisbane, Australia?Email:[email protected] Web: http://store.theartofservice.com ?eLearning: http://theartofservice.org ?Phone: +61 (0)7 3252 2055 8 IT Service Management The term IT Service Management is used in many ways by different management frameworks and the organizations that seek to use them.

While there are variations across these different sources of guidance, common elements for defining ITSM include: ? ? ? ? Description of the processes required to deliver and support IT Services for customers.

A focus on delivering and supporting the technology or products needed by the business to meet key organizational objectives or goals.

Definition of roles and responsibilities for the people involved including IT staff, customers and other stakeholders involved.

The management of external suppliers (partners) involved in the delivery and support of the technology and products being delivered and supported by IT.

The combination of these elements provide the capabilities required for an IT organization to deliver and support quality IT Services that meet specific business needs and requirements.

Formal definitions of ITSM define it as “A set of specialized organizational capabilities for providing value to customers in the form of services”.

These organizational capabilities are influenced by the needs and requirements of customers, the culture that exists within the service organization and the intangible nature of the output and intermediate products of IT services.

However IT Service Management comprises more than just these capabilities alone, being complemented by an industry of professional practice and wealth of knowledge, experience and skills.

The ITIL® framework has developed as a major source of good practice in Service Management and is used by organizations worldwide to establish and improve their ITSM practices. 75 Copyright The Art of Service ?Brisbane, Australia?Email:[email protected] Web: http://store.theartofservice.com ?eLearning: http://theartofservice.org ?Phone: +61 (0)7 3252 2055 8.1 What is ITIL®? ITIL® stands for the Information Technology Infrastructure Library.

ITIL® is the international de facto management framework describing ?good practices? for IT Service Management.

The ITIL® framework evolved from the UK government‘s efforts during the 1980s to document how successful organizations approached service management.

By the early 1990s they had produced a large collection of books documenting the ?best practices? for IT Service Management.

This library was eventually entitled the IT Infrastructure Library.

The Office of Government Commerce in the UK continues to operate as the trademark owner of ITIL®.

ITIL® has gone through several evolutions and was most recently refreshed with the release of version 3 in 2007.

Through these evolutions the scope of practices documented has increased in order to stay current with the continued maturity of the IT industry and meet the needs and requirements of the ITSM professional community.

ITIL® is only one of many sources for ITSM good practices, and should be used to complement any other set of practices being used by an organization.

Five volumes make up the IT Infrastructure Library (Version 3). ? ? ? ? ? Service Strategy Service Design Service Transition Service Operation Continual Service Improvement. Each volume provides the guidance necessary for an integrated approach, and addresses capabilities‘ direct impact on a service provider‘s performance.

The structure of the ITIL framework is that of the service lifecycle.

It ensures organizations are able to leverage capabilities in one area for learning and improvements in others.

The framework is used to provide structure, stability and strength to service management capabilities with durable principles, methods and tools.

This enables service providers to protect investments and provide the necessary basis for measurement, learning and improvement. 76 Copyright The Art of Service ?Brisbane, Australia?Email:[email protected] Web: http://store.theartofservice.com ?eLearning: http://theartofservice.org ?Phone: +61 (0)7 3252 2055 In addition to the core publications there is also ITIL Complimentary Guidance.

This consists of a complimentary set of publications with guidance specific to industry sectors, organization types, operating models and technology architectures.

At present, this complimentary guidance is available by subscription from http://www.bestpracticelive.com. 8.1.1 Good practices Ignoring public frameworks and standards can needlessly place an organization at a disadvantage.organizations should seek to cultivate their own proprietary knowledge on top of a body of knowledge developed from using public frameworks and standards.

Generally good practices are defined as those formalized as a result of being successful in wide-industry use.

Public frameworks (ITIL, COBIT, CMMI etc.): Frameworks are scaled and adapted by the organization when implemented, rather than following a prescriptive set of practices (standards).

Examples of public frameworks for ITSM include: ? ? ? ITIL ®.

COBIT – The Control Objectives for Information and related Technology.

Capability Maturity Model Integrated (CMMI) for IT Services. Standards: Usually a formal document that establishes uniform engineering or technical criteria, methods, processes and practices.

Unlike frameworks, they are prescriptive in declaring mandatory elements that must be demonstrated.

Examples of standards relating to ITSM are: ? ? ISO/IEC 20000 – International Standard for IT Service Management.

ISO/IEC 27001 – International Standard for Information Security Management Systems.

Proprietary knowledge of organizations and individuals: Specific expertise developed for internal purposes, or developed in order to sell to other organizations (EG Gartner). 77 Copyright The Art of Service ?Brisbane, Australia?Email:[email protected] Web: http://store.theartofservice.com ?eLearning: http://theartofservice.org ?Phone: +61 (0)7 3252 2055 9 The Service Lifecycle Lifecycle: The natural process of stages that an organism or inanimate object goes through as it matures.

For example, human stages are birth, infant, toddler, child, pre-teen, teenager, young adult, adult, elderly adult and death.

The concept of the Service Lifecycle is fundamental to ITIL® Version 3.

Previously, much of the focus of ITIL® was on the processes required to design, deliver and support services for customers.

As a result of this previous focus on processes, Version 2 of the ITIL® Framework provided best practices for ITSM based around the how questions.

These included: ? ? How should we design for availability, capacity and continuity of services? How can we respond to and manage incidents, problems and known errors? As Version 3 now maintains a holistic view covering the entire lifecycle of a service, no longer does ITIL® just answer the how questions, but also why? ? ? ? Why does a customer need this service? Why should the customer purchase services from us? Why should we provide (x) levels of availability, capacity and continuity? By first asking these questions it enables a service provider to provide overall strategic objectives for the IT organization, which will then be used to direct how services are designed, transitioned, supported and improved in order to deliver optimum value to customers and stakeholders.

The ultimate success of service management is indicated by the strength of the relationship between customers and service providers.

The 5 phases of the Service Lifecycle provide the necessary guidance to achieve this success.

Together they provide a body of knowledge and set of good practices for successful service management. 78 Copyright The Art of Service ?Brisbane, Australia?Email:[email protected] Web: http://store.theartofservice.com ?eLearning: http://theartofservice.org ?Phone: +61 (0)7 3252 2055 This end-to-end view of how IT should be integrated with business strategy is at the heart of ITIL‘s® five core volumes. 9.1 Mapping the Concepts of ITIL® to the Service Lifecycle There has been much debate as to exactly how many processes exist within Version 3 of ITIL®.

Questions asked include: ? ? ? What exactly constitutes a process? Shouldn‘t some processes be defined as functions? Why has x process been left out? In developing this material, we have based our definitions of processes and functions and where they fit on the guidance provided by the ITIL® Foundation syllabus by EXIN International.

The figure below demonstrates the processes and functions of ITIL® in relation to the 5 Service Lifecycle Phases.

It also demonstrates the increased scope now covered by ITIL® Version 3. 79 Copyright The Art of Service ?Brisbane, Australia?Email:[email protected] Web: http://store.theartofservice.com ?eLearning: http://theartofservice.org ?Phone: +61 (0)7 3252 2055 Note: ? ? ? ? The Service Lifecycle phases (and ITIL® books) are shown through the arrows at the bottom The concepts in light shading are the ITIL® V3 processes covered within the program The concepts in dark shading are Functions Processes that are not covered by the current ITIL V3 Foundation syllabus (currently 4.2), are not discussed fully in this book, but will be referenced where necessary for understanding. 9.2 How does the Service Lifecycle work? Although there are five phases throughout the Lifecycle, they are not separate, nor are the phases necessarily carried out in a particular order.

The whole ethos of the Service Lifecycle approach is that each phase will affect the other, creating a continuous cycle.

For this to work successfully, the Continuous Service Improvement (CSI) phase is incorporated throughout all of the other phases.

The figure below demonstrates some of the key outputs from each of the Service Lifecycle Phases. 80 Copyright The Art of Service ?Brisbane, Australia?Email:[email protected] Web: http://store.theartofservice.com ?eLearning: http://theartofservice.org ?Phone: +61 (0)7 3252 2055 It is important to note that most of the processes defined do not get executed within only one lifecycle phase.

Service Strategy Phase: Determine the needs, priorities, demands and relative importance for desired services.

Identifies the value being created through services and the predicted financial resources required to design, deliver and support them.

Service Design Phase: Designs the infrastructure, processes and support mechanisms needed to meet the Availability requirements of the customer.

Service Transition Phase: Validates that the Service meets the functional and technical fitness criteria to justify release to the customer.

Service Operation Phase: Monitors the ongoing Availability being provided.

During this phase we also manage and resolve incidents that affect Service Availability.

Continual Service Improvement Phase: Coordinates the collection of data, information and knowledge regarding the quality and performance of services supplied and Service Management activities performed.

Service Improvement Plans developed and coordinated to improve any aspect involved in the management of IT services. 81 Copyright The Art of Service ?Brisbane, Australia?Email:[email protected] Web: http://store.theartofservice.com ?eLearning: http://theartofservice.org ?Phone: +61 (0)7 3252 2055 10 Service Delivery Principles As a Help Desk Manager should already be familiar with many Service Delivery Principles (EG Service Level Agreements, Change Management processes etc.) the information provided here has been chosen with the specific focus on helping someone move from a Help Desk Analyst or Technician role into the role of a Help Desk Manager. — 12 Service Operation Processes The goal of Service Operation, as previously mentioned, is to enable effectiveness and efficiency in delivery and support of IT services.

The processes that support this goal are: ? ? ? ? ? Event Management Incident Management Problem Management Request Fulfillment Access Management. The figure above demonstrates how much responsibility the Help desk and the Technical Support Groups (Technical, IT Operations and Application Management functions) have in the Service Operation Processes.

Incident Management, Request Fulfillment and Access Management are primarily carried out by the Help desk, with Event Management and Problem Management as primarily ?back -of-house‘ processes. 107 Copyright The Art of Service ?Brisbane, Australia?Email:[email protected] Web: http://store.theartofservice.com ?eLearning: http://theartofservice.org ?Phone: +61 (0)7 3252 2055 12.1 Incident Management Incident Management has developed over time to become one of the most visible and mature ITIL processes for any organization, largely driven by the need to reduce the business impact of disruptions to IT services.

Like Request Fulfillment, Incident Management will be the process that the Help Desk is most involved with as part of the support of IT services for the end user population. 12.1.1 Goals and Objectives The goal of Incident Management is to restore normal service operation as quickly as possible and minimize the adverse impact on business operations, thus ensuring that the best possible levels of service quality and availability are maintained.

Normal service operation is defined as operating within the agreed Service Level Agreement (SLA) limits. 108 Copyright The Art of Service ?Brisbane, Australia?Email:[email protected] Web: http://store.theartofservice.com ?eLearning: http://theartofservice.org ?Phone: +61 (0)7 3252 2055 EG where a transaction is processed correctly, taking no more than 15 seconds to complete. 12.1.2 Scope — 3. „Other? Approval Where there may be compliance and regulatory implications for the service request, wider business approval may be needed.

These approval mechanisms should be built into the request models as appropriate.

Change Management should establish that there are mechanisms in place to check for, and safeguard these conditions in order for the standard change to be qualified for preapproval. 4.

Fulfillment The tasks required for Fulfillment will vary depending on the characteristics of the service request at hand.

Some requests can be fulfilled using only automated mechanisms.

Others may be fulfilled by the Help desk at the first-line, or escalated where necessary to internal or external specialist groups.

To ensure compatibility, Request Fulfillment should be interfaced with existing procurement and supplier processes; however the Help desk should maintain control and visibility for all requests regardless where it is fulfilled. 5.

Closure When the Service Request has been fulfilled, it should be referred back to the Help desk to initiate closure.

This should include some verification that the request has been satisfied using either confirmation with the end user or other automated means. 127 Copyright The Art of Service ?Brisbane, Australia?Email:[email protected] Web: http://store.theartofservice.com ?eLearning: http://theartofservice.org ?Phone: +61 (0)7 3252 2055 13 Selecting / Configuring Help Desk Tools Selection of appropriate tools and technology is becoming increasingly important for the successful provision and management of Help Desk services.

While such tools have existed for many years, the requirements of the typical Help Desk have changed significantly over the last few years.

Some of the reasons behind this are: ? The responsibilities of the Help Desk are expanding in scope o In the past, the primary role of the Help Desk was to manage user requests and incidents as part of the overall business systems support.

More recently, the role has expanded to take on many other aspects of service provision, including facilitating user training and awareness, coordinating Knowledge Management practices and many other related tasks. ? The workload for Help Desks has increased o As most businesses have become more dependent on ICT, the importance of providing fast response to business issues and requests has also increased.

This has seen a gradual increase in the number of calls and emails being submitted to the Help Desk. ? IT Service Providers are becoming increasingly customer oriented and business focused o While in the past IT organizations were primarily focused on the technology being managed, modern providers are becoming increasingly measured in terms of value, customer satisfaction and financial transparency.

This is reflected by an increased understanding of the importance of first line services provided by the Help Desk. ? The business expects financial transparency o Help Desk tools are also becoming increasingly important so that it can e clearly demonstrated where the costs involved in delivering and supporting IT services should be attributed, as well as for justification of those expenses. ? Mobility is increasing o In the modern business environment, users are increasingly conducting business transactions outside their physical offices, 128 Copyright The Art of Service ?Brisbane, Australia?Email:[email protected] Web: http://store.theartofservice.com ?eLearning: http://theartofservice.org ?Phone: +61 (0)7 3252 2055 13.1 Common features across most Help Desk tools While toolsets will vary between vendors, the current generation of tools has a fairly consistent set of ITIL process-based features, typically including: ? ? ? Template and configurable workflows for process automation SLA timers to ensure appropriate levels of service quality are delivered Modules for common ITIL processes, usually: o o o o o o o ? ? ? ? Incident Management Problem Management Request Fulfillment Change Management Release & Deployment Management Service Asset & Configuration Management Knowledge Management Configurable escalation pathways and routines (to assist in the resolution of incidents and requests) Self help portals for user and customer access Event capture and notification (including automatic incident logging) Dashboards for reporting and to provide clear visibility of current and historical data relating to IT services (including Help Desk statistics). 13.2 Additional or custom features Though there are many other features that will be offered by one or more vendors, some of the more prevalent options that provide additional functionality of the Help Desk tool include: ? Service Catalogue functionality, including integration with self-help routines so that users can request common services or access privileges without tying up the Help Desk ? ? Support for mobile devices, such as Blackberrys, iPhones etc.

Identity and access management 129 Copyright The Art of Service ?Brisbane, Australia?Email:[email protected] Web: http://store.theartofservice.com ?eLearning: http://theartofservice.org ?Phone: +61 (0)7 3252 2055 ? ? Application and device auto discovery (for detecting dependencies, status and other relevant data) Proactive Problem Management, by synthesizing all available event and incident information. 13.3 Selection process for Help Desk tools — 147 Copyright The Art of Service ?Brisbane, Australia?Email:[email protected] Web: http://store.theartofservice.com ?eLearning: http://theartofservice.org ?Phone: +61 (0)7 3252 2055 Term Information Technology (IT) Definition The use of technology for the storage, communication or processing of information.

The technology typically includes computers, telecommunications, Applications and other software.

The information may include Business data, voice, images, video, etc.

Information Technology is often used to support Business Processes through IT Services. IT Infrastructure Library (ITIL) A set of Best Practice guidance for IT Service Management.

ITIL is owned by the OGC and is developed in conjunction with the itSMF.

ITIL consists of a series of publications giving guidance on the provision of Quality IT Services, and on the Processes and facilities needed to support them.

See http://www.ogc.gov.uk/index.asp?id=2261 for more information. Key Performance Indicator (KPI) A Metric that is used to help manage a Process, IT Service or Activity.

Many Metrics may be measured, but only the most important of these are defined as KPIs and used to actively manage and report on the Process, IT Service or Activity.

KPIs should be selected to ensure that Efficiency, Effectiveness, and Cost Effectiveness are all managed. Knowledge Management The Process responsible for gathering, analyzing, storing and sharing knowledge information within an Organization.

The primary purpose of Knowledge Management is to improve Efficiency by reducing the need to rediscover knowledge. Known Error (KE) (Problem Management) A Problem that has a documented Root Cause and a Workaround.

Known Errors are created by Problem Control and are managed throughout their Lifecycle by Error Control.

Known Errors may also be identified by Development or Suppliers. Known Error Database — A Function of a Business Process which is critical to the success of the Business.

Vital Business Functions are an important consideration of Business Continuity Management, IT Service Continuity Management and Availability Management. Workaround (Incident Management) (Problem Management) Reducing or eliminating the Impact of an Incident or Problem for which a full Resolution is not yet available.

For example by restarting a failed Configuration Item.

Workarounds for Problems are documented in Known Error Records.

Workarounds for Incidents that do not have associated Problem Records are documented in the Incident Record. 152 Copyright The Art of Service ?Brisbane, Australia?Email:[email protected] Web: http://store.theartofservice.com ?eLearning: http://theartofservice.org ?Phone: +61 (0)7 3252 2055 17 Industry Certifications 17.1 ITIL® Certification Pathways There are many pathway options that are available once you have acquired your ITIL® Foundation Certification.

Below illustrates the possible pathways that are available to you.

Currently it is intended that the highest certification is the ITIL® V3 Expert, considered to be equal to that of Diploma Status. Figure 12.A – ITIL® Certification Pathway For more information on certification and available programs please visit our website http://theartofservice.com. 153 Copyright The Art of Service ?Brisbane, Australia?Email:[email protected] Web: http://store.theartofservice.com ?eLearning: http://theartofservice.org ?Phone: +61 (0)7 3252 2055 17.2 ISO/IEC 20000 Pathways ISO/IEC 20000 Standard is becoming a basic requirement for IT Service providers and is fast becoming the most recognized symbol of quality regarding IT Service Management processes.

Once you have acquired your ITIL® Foundation Certification, you are eligible to pursue the ISO/IEC 20000 certification pathways.

ISO/IEC 20000 programs aim to assist IT professionals master and understand the standard itself and issues relating to earning actual standards compliance. Figure 12.B – ISO/IEC 20000 Certification Pathway For more information on certification and available programs please visit our website http://theartofservice.com. 154 Copyright The Art of Service ?Brisbane, Australia?Email:[email protected] Web: http://store.theartofservice.com ?eLearning: http://theartofservice.org ?Phone: +61 (0)7 3252 2055 17.3 Cloud Computing Regardless of the size, complexity and ownership of the IT infrastructure, utilizing appropriate ITSM principles will always add value for customers and the IT service provider(s).

In the case of cloud computing environments, ITSM capabilities will need to be adapted somewhat to suit the organization‘s needs, but the underlying core practices and principles should still remain the same.

To cater for this need, we have developed a set of education programs that provide individuals with the skills and knowledge required for managing cloud-based IT services. The certification pathway is made up by the following levels: Foundation: The Cloud Computing Foundation program is focused on ensuring that the candidate can explain: ? ? ? ? The various ways in which cloud environments are used for IT service provision The benefits that clouds offer to customers and IT organizations alike Important terminology relating to cloud computing Technologies supporting cloud computing and the primary vendors involved. 155 Copyright The Art of Service ?Brisbane, Australia?Email:[email protected] Web: http://store.theartofservice.com ?eLearning: http://theartofservice.org ?Phone: +61 (0)7 3252 2055 After passing the Foundation exam, the participant is awarded two points towards achieving their Executive Level certification.

Specialist: The Specialist Level programs are aimed at the ‘practitioners’ involved n the management of cloud environments and related services.

Rather than just a basic understanding, these programs seek to ensure that participants demonstrate the skills and knowledge to actually manage cloud environments with the use of IT Service Management processes.

The Specialist Level is broken into three programs: ? ? ? Software as a Service (SaaS) + Web Applications Virtualization Platform & Storage Management For each exam successfully completed the participant will gain 3 points towards their Executive Level certification.

Executive: The Executive Level Certification aims to ensure that the candidate has both the technical and strategic skills required to successfully plan, adopt and manage cloud services. — 156 Copyright The Art of Service ?Brisbane, Australia?Email:[email protected] Web: http://store.theartofservice.com ?eLearning: http://theartofservice.org ?Phone: +61 (0)7 3252 2055 18 Index A A-Players 24-31, 34-6 access 5, 136, 141 accuracy 16-17, 73, 90 agreement 39, 41 applications 82-3, 125, 136, 141, 143, 148-9 assets 29, 33, 85-9, 122, 132, 150 attributes 84, 86, 146 availability 72, 78, 84, 98, 108, 143 B balance 62, 68, 93, 96 behaviors 17-19, 33, 39, 41, 50, 54-5, 59, 61-2, 67, 71, 136, 141 benefits 2-3, 9, 35, 53, 84, 86, 91-3, 99-103, 135-6, 140-1, 155 business 27, 63, 66, 68, 75, 83-6, 88, 92-4, 98-9, 104, 111, 124, 128, 145, 149-50, 152 business processes 84, 87, 143-4, 152 C C-Players 24, 28, 32, 34, 36 candidates 16-17, 19-21, 29, 32-3, 35, 60, 155-6 capabilities 11, 16, 75-6, 84-5, 91, 131 capacity 14, 78, 84, 93-4, 145, 147 career 4, 31-2 CEOs 26-7, 29, 118 certification 153-4 change 25, 35, 41, 47, 54, 58, 65, 70-1, 86, 121-2, 138, 142, 144-5, 147, 149-50, 152 Change Management 13, 125-7, 129, 145-7, 150 CIs 146 classifications 89, 131 cloud computing 10, 155-6 CMDB 146-7 CMMI (Capability Maturity Model Integrated) 77 coaching 7, 14, 34-5, 61 collaboration 10, 55, 132 commitment 34, 42, 54, 58, 71 communication 72, 83-4, 86, 98, 100, 105, 134, 139, 144, 148, 151 companies 2, 14, 19, 24, 27-9, 31-2, 36, 55, 62, 71-4, 117, 137 competencies 17, 29, 32-3, 35, 54 concepts 9, 56, 62, 78-80, 82-4 Configuration Item (CI) 119, 143-7, 149, 151-2 conflict resolution 42-3 continuity 78 Continuous Service Improvement (CSI) 80 control 50-1, 71, 86-7, 109, 127, 146 costs 19-21, 24-5, 27, 66, 71, 73, 82, 85-6, 88-90, 92-3, 100-1, 126, 128, 134-5, 139-40, 146 customers 11, 13, 22, 54, 75, 78, 81-7, 93, 96, 105, 110, 124-5, 131, 145-7, 150-2, 155 157 Copyright The Art of Service ?Brisbane, Australia?Email:[email protected] Web: http://store.theartofservice.com ?eLearning: http://theartofservice.org ?Phone: +61 (0)7 3252 2055 D delivery 70, 75, 88, 96, 107, 110, 146, 151 demand 34, 81, 86, 88, 90, 93-4 Demand Management 9, 88, 93-4, 147 departments 11, 62, 66, 69, 72, 89, 97, 117, 125-6, 137-8 development 14, 35, 67, 71, 91, 148-9 disruption 98, 105, 108-9, 112, 125, 136, 141, 144, 149 distribution 73, 124, 144 E employees 8, 19, 24, 36-7, 44, 46, 49-51, 53-9, 61-2, 67-74, 118, 134, 139 environment 15, 37, 43, 97, 101, 132, 136, 141 experience 13-14, 19, 75, 88 F feedback 35, 56, 58-9, 61, 67, 72-4 Financial Management 9, 85-6, 88, 143-7, 150 focus 4, 11, 36-7, 42, 45, 51, 55, 67, 75, 78, 82, 105, 110 functions 79, 97, 99, 120, 131, 143, 152 funding 9, 90-1 G goals 8-10, 18, 35, 39-40, 42-3, 47-50, 54, 62, 65, 75, 86, 94, 97-8, 107-8, 125, 132 group 20, 26, 38-9, 41-2, 49, 67, 84, 95, 109-10, 114, 131, 145-6 guidance 4, 42, 75-9, 96, 115, 148 H hardware 82, 87, 89, 119, 146-7, 149-50 Help desk 9, 12-13, 98-101, 104-7, 110, 113, 115-16, 119, 124, 126-7, 136, 141, 147-9, 151 hire 19, 24-6, 29, 34-5, 134, 139 I implementation 47, 53, 99, 102, 111, 137, 149 Incident Management 9, 107-9, 111, 124-5, 129, 131, 147-9, 152 incidents 12, 63, 78, 81, 98, 101, 105, 109-20, 124, 128-9, 131, 138, 141-2, 146-7, 149, 151-2 information 2, 20, 33, 52, 74, 77, 81-2, 111, 113, 117-20, 125, 131, 146, 148, 150, 153-4 infrastructure 81-2, 95, 105, 109-10, 115, 132, 136, 141, 143-5, 148-9, 151, 155 interviewee 16, 32-3, 71 interviewers 16, 32-3 investment 29, 74, 76, 150 ITIL 8-10, 75-80, 129, 148, 153-4 J job 17, 19-21, 23, 25, 27-8, 32, 44, 48, 54, 59-60, 66, 69, 72, 97 job analysis 7, 21, 36, 59 K 158 Copyright The Art of Service ?Brisbane, Australia?Email:[email protected] Web: http://store.theartofservice.com ?eLearning: http://theartofservice.org ?Phone: +61 (0)7 3252 2055 KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATORS (KPIS) 8-9, 62, 105 Knowledge Management 129, 131, 148 Known Error (KE) 78, 103, 113, 121, 148, 152 KPIs (Key Performance Indicators) 8-9, 62-5, 105, 146, 148 L leader 24, 41-3 lifecycle 78, 80, 134, 139, 143, 145-9 M Major Incident 110, 138, 142, 147, 149 management 25, 27-9, 31, 33, 52, 71, 75, 81, 85, 96, 99, 128, 131, 143, 145-6, 148-9 members 39, 42, 52-4, 132, 135, 140 metrics 65, 105, 124, 148 mis-hires 24-7 model 29, 39, 91, 96, 119 money 8, 19, 21, 47, 52, 68, 83, 85, 144, 146 motivation 8, 44-7, 71 O objectives 9, 48, 56, 62, 86, 93-4, 96, 98-9, 108, 124-5, 132 operations 14, 90, 93, 96-7, 136, 141 organizations 16-17, 20-1, 24-6, 30-1, 37, 40-1, 51-4, 56-8, 61-2, 66-7, 71-8, 82-3, 85-6, 91-3, 98-9, 1378 outsourcing 9, 106 P PAs 56-7, 59 patterns 19, 32-3, 94 performance 14, 17-18, 28, 34, 45, 50, 56-9, 62-3, 65, 71, 76, 81, 84, 95, 105, 143 phases 78, 80-1, 96, 122 planning 13, 21, 48, 74, 88, 90-1, 110, 143, 150 Problem Management 110, 116, 129, 148-9, 152 problems 5, 16, 31, 34, 37, 42, 78, 95, 124, 131, 146, 148-9, 152 providers 29, 83-4, 87, 89 R relationships 14, 41, 73, 78, 83, 145-6 release 76, 81, 144, 147, 150 Request Fulfillment 10, 108-9, 125, 127, 129 requests 20, 90, 98-9, 101, 105, 121, 125-9, 138, 142, 150 resources 11, 13, 20, 47, 73, 86, 92, 99, 126, 136, 141, 145 responsibilities 7, 11-12, 22, 38-41, 50, 66-7, 75, 97, 107, 110, 126, 128, 135, 140, 151 result 34, 72-4, 77-8, 85, 88, 100, 109-10, 131 review 3, 13-14, 33, 57, 62 rewards 37, 45, 52-4, 64, 66, 68-9, 132 RFC (Request for Change) 90, 121-2, 138, 142, 150-1 risks 36, 82, 92-3, 101, 106, 112, 150, 156 roles 12-15, 39-40, 42, 75, 82-3, 97-8, 109, 124, 126, 128, 134, 137, 139, 143, 149 159 Copyright The Art of Service ?Brisbane, Australia?Email:[email protected] Web: http://store.theartofservice.com ?eLearning: http://theartofservice.org ?Phone: +61 (0)7 3252 2055 S scope 9-10, 76, 91, 96, 109, 125, 128, 145 selection 20, 29, 32, 36, 64, 128, 130 self help 106, 109, 125-6 Service Level 13-14, 96, 100, 151 service lifecycle 9, 76, 78-80, 82 Service Management 4, 8, 75-8, 106, 109, 120, 124, 148 Service Operation 96-8, 107, 134, 139 service provider 76, 78, 84-6, 93-4, 128, 145-6, 149-51, 154-5 service requests 109, 119, 125-7, 134, 139, 151 Service Value 9, 83-4, 88 services 2, 75, 77-8, 81-99, 102-3, 107-9, 112, 125-6, 128-9, 131, 134, 136, 139, 141, 143-51, 155-6 setting goals 8, 47, 49, 56, 61 skills 4, 11, 14, 21, 29, 34, 49, 53, 75, 82, 104-5, 155-6 SLAs (Service Level Agreement) 14, 82, 106, 108-9, 119, 131, 146, 150-1 software 87, 89, 119, 146-8, 150 sources 66, 75-6, 93, 111, 113, 125 staff 13, 45, 64, 66-8, 72, 74-5, 83, 100-2, 104-5, 111, 124, 131, 137 staffing 12, 104 status 118, 120-1, 130, 149 strategy 29, 31, 37, 49-50, 66, 68 strengths 32-5, 76, 78 structure 16, 76, 100, 103 subordinates 22, 31, 34-5 success 28-9, 32-4, 55, 67, 72, 78, 125, 152 supervisors 12, 44-6, 49, 56-8, 72 support 4, 11, 72, 75, 81, 84-5, 87-8, 93-4, 96-9, 102-3, 105-8, 110, 114, 131-2, 134-5, 139-40 survey 35, 68, 70, 73-4, 106, 116 systems 13, 53, 55, 71, 77, 116, 131, 138 T teams 7-8, 19, 24, 26, 37-42, 51-5, 98, 110 techniques 24, 42, 88, 91, 94-5, 113, 147 technology 14, 57, 75, 77, 84, 96, 98-9, 102, 104, 126, 128, 134, 139, 148 timescales 109-10, 112, 137 tools 6, 54, 66, 76, 96, 120, 126, 128-9, 143 topgrading 7, 24-30, 32, 34, 36 U urgency 110, 112, 119, 137, 152 users 6, 83, 92, 94, 98-102, 105, 110-11, 113, 115, 120, 124-9, 131, 135-6, 140-1, 146-7, 151-2 V value 3, 55, 59, 62, 66-8, 72, 74-5, 82-7, 89, 93, 119, 122, 128, 135, 140, 143 W website 20, 125-6, 131, 153-4 work 3, 16, 19, 37-9, 44, 47, 49-50, 54-5, 57, 70-1, 80, 92 workarounds 103, 148, 152 160 Copyright The Art of Service ?Brisbane, Australia?Email:[email protected] Web: http://store.theartofservice.com ?eLearning: http://theartofservice.org ?Phone: +61 (0)7 3252 2055

Read more about 1 WHAT IS ITIL®? :

Accredited ITIL Foundation, Intermediate and Expert Certifications

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ITIL and 1 WHAT IS ITIL®?

ITIL - 1 WHAT IS ITIL®?

ITIL and 1 WHAT IS ITIL®?

ITIL - 1 WHAT IS ITIL®?

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