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Dock

Bioinformatics – Docking algorithms

A variety of methods have been developed to tackle the Protein–protein docking problem, though it seems that there is still much work to be done in this field.

Ian Murdock – Life and career

Ian Ashley Murdock was born in Konstanz, West Germany on April 28, 1973. He wrote the Debian Manifesto in 1993 while a student at Purdue University, where he earned his bachelor’s degree in computer science in 1996. He named Debian after his then-girlfriend Debra Lynn, and himself (Deb and Ian). They subsequently married (between 1993 – 1996), filed for divorce on the week of August 10, 2007, and were granted the divorce in January, 2008.

Ian Murdock – Life and career

On joining Sun, he led Project Indiana, which he described as “taking the lesson that Linux has brought to the operating system and providing that for Solaris”, making a full OpenSolaris distribution with GNOME and userland tools from GNU plus a network-based package management system. From March 2007 to February 2010, he was Vice President of Emerging Platforms at Sun, until the company merged with Oracle and he resigned his position with the company.

Ian Murdock – Life and career

Murdock is currently Vice President of Platform and Developer Community at ExactTarget, based in Indianapolis.

Laptop – Docking stations

Both docking stations and port replicators are intended to be used at a permanent working place (a desk) to offer instant connection to multiple input/output devices and to extend a laptop’s capabilities.

Laptop – Docking stations

The most common use was in a corporate computing environment where the company had standardized on a common network card and this same card was placed into the docking station

Haddock

The haddock (Melanogrammus aeglefinus) is a marine fish distributed on both sides of the North Atlantic. Haddock is a popular food fish and is widely fished commercially.

Haddock

The haddock is easily recognized by a black lateral line running along its white side (not to be confused with pollock which has the reverse, i.e. white line on black side) and a distinctive dark blotch above the pectoral fin, often described as a “thumbprint” or even the “Devil’s thumbprint” or “St. Peter’s mark”.

Haddock

Haddock feed primarily on small invertebrates, although larger members of the species may occasionally consume fish.

Haddock

Growth rates of haddock, however, had slowed in recent years

Haddock – Parasites

Cod and related species are plagued by parasites. For example the cod worm, Lernaeocera branchialis, starts life as a copepod, a small, free-swimming crustacean larva. The first host used by cod worm is a flatfish or lumpsucker, which they capture with grasping hooks at the front of their bodies. They penetrate the lumpsucker with a thin filament which they use to suck its blood. The nourished cod worms then mate on the lumpsucker.

Haddock – Parasites

The female worm, with her now fertilized eggs, then finds a cod, or a cod-like fish such as a haddock or whiting

Haddock – Fisheries

Reaching sizes up to 1.1 m (3 ft 7 in), haddock is fished for year-round. Some of the methods used are Danish seine nets, trawlers, long lines and fishing nets. The commercial catch of haddock in North America had declined sharply in recent years, but is now recovering, with recruitment rates running around where they historically were from the 1930s to 1960s.

Haddock – Fisheries

In 2010, Greenpeace International has added the haddock to its seafood red list. “The Greenpeace International seafood red list is a list of fish that are commonly sold in supermarkets around the world, and which have a very high risk of being sourced from unsustainable fisheries.”

Haddock – Fisheries

Haddock populations on the offshore grounds of Georges Bank off New England and Nova Scotia have made a remarkable comeback with the adoption of catch shares management program, and are currently harvested at only a fraction of sustainable yields.

Haddock – As food

Haddock is a very popular food fish, sold fresh, smoked, frozen, dried, or to a small extent canned. Haddock, along with Atlantic cod and plaice, is one of the most popular fish used in British fish and chips.

Haddock – As food

Haddock is the predominant fish of choice in Scotland in a fish supper

Haddock – As food

Unlike the related cod, haddock does not salt well and is often preserved by drying and smoking.

Haddock – As food

Grimsby fish market sources its haddock from the North East Atlantic, principally Iceland, Norway and the Faroe Islands

Haddock – As food

One popular form of haddock is Finnan haddie which takes its name from the fishing village of Finnan or Findon in Scotland, where it was originally cold-smoked over peat. Finnan haddie is often served poached in milk for breakfast.

Haddock – As food

The town of Arbroath on the east coast of Scotland produces the Arbroath smokie. This is a hot-smoked haddock which requires no further cooking before eating.

Haddock – As food

Smoked haddock naturally has an off-white colour; it is very often dyed yellow, as are other smoked fish. Smoked haddock is the essential ingredient in the Anglo-Indian dish kedgeree, and also in the Scottish dish “Cullen Skink” (a ‘chowder’ like soup).

Asus Eee Pad Transformer – Docking keyboard

An optional docking keyboard was available at launch. It features full QWERTY keys, trackpad, two USB 2.0 ports and one Secure Digital|SD card reader as well as an additional battery that increases overall battery life from 9.5 hours to 16 hours.

Asus Eee Pad Transformer – Docking keyboard

The USB ports support USB memory of any kind and also NTFS-formatted media with files larger than 4 GB. Also the SD card slot supports NTFS-formatted media.

Asus Eee Pad Transformer – Docking keyboard

The units marketed in Canada marked Canadian BI Lingual (CBIL) have a slightly modified keyboard layout in addition to support of accented characters. The Shift key and Enter key have been made smaller to accommodate two additional keys.

Stardock Central

‘Stardock Central’ was a software content delivery and digital rights management system used by Stardock customers to access components of the Object Desktop, TotalGaming.net and ThinkDesk product lines, as well as products under the WinCustomize brand.

Stardock Central

Introduced in 2001 to access games on TotalGaming.net (then known as the Drengin Network), Stardock Central was later expanded to cover all Stardock products, replacing Component Manager (1999).

Stardock Central

As of 2010, Stardock Central had been phased out in favour of its successor, Impulse (content delivery)|Impulse. However, in March 2011 Impulse was sold to GameStop and Stardock soon reopened their own online store. As of April 2012, the Stardock Central software has been revived and released as a Beta to once again provide a proprietary platform for Stardock’s digital product downloads.

Stardock Central – Features

Software on Stardock Central was divided into components, and further divided into packages. When users purchased a product or a subscription, they gained access to it via Stardock Central. The program had the ability to break products into components so that users on slower connections could start using the main portion of the software as soon as possible, and download extras — such as in-game movies or music — at a later date.

Stardock Central – Features

Users could also use the program to interact on Stardock’s discussion boards or access the [irc://irc.stardock.com/stardock Stardock IRC server] via a built-in IRC client

Stardock Central – Features

Stardock Central was similar in concept to the later-developed Steam (software)|Steam content delivery system; unlike Steam, it did not require a permanent connection to the Internet, only being required when a user wanted to install or update a product (or when needed for its chatting, content libraries, or forum support).

Stardock Central – History

In 2004, Stardock Central began to deliver third party content as well such as games from Take 2, Strategy First, and Ubisoft

Dockers

‘Dockers’ is a brand of khaki garments and other accessories from Levi Strauss Co.

Dockers

Levi Strauss Co., then specializing in denim, introduced the Dockers brand in 1986. Dockers became a leading brand of business casual clothing for men led by Bob Siegel. In 1987, Dockers introduced a women’s line. In 1993 the Dockers brand was introduced into Europe under the leadership of Joe Middleton.

Dockers – 2010 Campaign

In January 2010, The Dockers Brand launched an aggressive, cross-channel advertising campaign with the tagline Wear The Pants. The campaign premiered during the 2010 Super Bowl, and was the first Super Bowl advertisement to offer an exclusive, limited time online offer for viewers. The ad also featured I Wear No Pants by the Poxy Boggards.

Dockers – 2010 Campaign

The Dockers campaign tagline, Wear The Pants, was marketed as a call to masculinity for men. The campaign incorporated outside sources to incite men to reclaim their lost male-aesthetic. Along with a new campaign message, the Dockers brand has since revitalized their product line as well, featuring several new styles aimed at a younger, status-seeker consumer. The Dockers brand has also partnered with Habitat for Humanity as their charitable cause.

Docklands Light Railway

The ‘Docklands Light Railway’ (‘the DLR’) is an automated medium-capacity rail transport system|light metro system opened in 1987 to serve the redeveloped London Docklands|Docklands area of London. It reaches north to Stratford, London|Stratford, south to Lewisham, west to and in the City of London financial district, and east to Beckton, London City Airport and Woolwich Arsenal station|Woolwich Arsenal.

Docklands Light Railway

The system uses minimal staffing on trains and at major interchange stations; the four sub-surface stations are staffed to comply with underground station requirements. Similar proposals have been made for the adjacent system, London Underground|the Tube.

Docklands Light Railway

The DLR is operated under a concession awarded by Transport for London to Serco Docklands,data.companieshouse.gov.uk/doc/company/00242246 part of the Serco Group.www.tfl.gov.uk/corporate/modesoftransport/dlr/1532.aspx#page-link-agreement-with-sercoSerco Limited Annual Accounts 31 December 2011 The system is owned by Docklands Light Railway Ltd,data.companieshouse.gov.uk/doc/company/02052677 part of the London Rail division of Transport for London

Docklands Light Railway – Origins and development

Land at Ludgate Circus and Lewisham had been reserved for the second stage, a station partly constructed in the City and buildings at Cannon Street modified, but rising costs and the low level of development in Docklands then envisaged not justifying the railway led to the project’s indefinite postponement in the early 1980s.

Docklands Light Railway – Origins and development

The growth brought to London Docklands|Docklands enabled the Jubilee Line to be extended in 1999 to east London by a more southerly route than originally proposed, through Surrey Quays, Canary Wharf and the Greenwich Peninsula (which was the next regeneration area) to Stratford.

Docklands Light Railway – Origins and development

The contract for the initial system was awarded to General Electric Company plc|GEC Mowlem in 1984 and the system was constructed from 1985 to 1987 at a cost of £77million.Roger Ford|Ford, Roger. Opening of the Docklands Light Railway. Modern Railways (London). September 1987. The line was officially opened by Elizabeth II of the United Kingdom|Queen Elizabeth II on 30 July 1987, and passenger services began on 31 August.

Docklands Light Railway – Initial system (1987–1990)

The initial system comprised two routes, from and Stratford station|Stratford to

Docklands Light Railway – Initial system (1987–1990)

The system was lightweight, with stations designed for trains of only a single articulated vehicle

Docklands Light Railway – First stage extensions (1991–1994)

The original trains, not suitable for use underground, were operated for a time on the above-ground sections only, and later were sold (see the #Rolling stock|Rolling Stock section below, and the main article Docklands Light Railway rolling stock).

Docklands Light Railway – First stage extensions (1991–1994)

As the Canary Wharf office complex grew, station was redeveloped from a small wayside station to a large one with six platforms serving three tracks and a large overall roof, fully integrated into the malls below the office towers.[http://www.tfl.gov.uk/corporate/modesoftransport/dlr/history/2982.aspx DLR history timeline]

Docklands Light Railway – First stage extensions (1991–1994)

The east of London Docklands|Docklands needed better transport connections to encourage development, and a fourth branch was opened in 1994, from to via transport interchange, along the north side of the Royal Docks complex

Docklands Light Railway – Second stage extensions (1996–1999)

In its early days, the system had been criticised by some experts as being the wrong type of system for Docklands’ needs, in comparison with the London Underground|Underground line proposed in the 1980s

Docklands Light Railway – Second stage extensions (1996–1999)

On 3 December 1999 the Lewisham extension opened

Docklands Light Railway – Third stage extensions and enhancements (2004–2009)

The next developments were aided by a five-year programme of investment for public transport across London that was unveiled by Mayor of London Ken Livingstone on 12 October 2004. On 2 December 2005, an eastward branch along the approximate route of the former Eastern Counties and Thames Junction Railway on the southern side of the Royal Docks complex opened from Canning Town to via .

Docklands Light Railway – Third stage extensions and enhancements (2004–2009)

A further extension from to Woolwich Arsenal station|Woolwich Arsenal opened on 10 January 2009, providing interchange with the North Kent main line, close to the planned future stop on the Crossrail line to Abbey Wood via West India and Royal Docks, met by Private Finance Initiative funding

Docklands Light Railway – Third stage extensions and enhancements (2004–2009)

The original station was closed in mid-2008 for complete reconstruction. The two terminal tracks either side of a narrow island platform were replaced by a single track between two platforms, one for arriving passengers and the other for departing (Spanish solution). It reopened on 2 March 2009.

Docklands Light Railway – Third stage extensions and enhancements (2004–2009)

As part of an upgrade to allow three-car trains, strengthening work was necessary at the Delta Junction north of

Docklands Light Railway – Stratford International to Canning Town Extension (2011)

In addition to the three-car station extensions, part of which was funded from the 2012 Olympics budget, a line was opened from Canning Town to Stratford and Stratford International along the former North London Line of the national rail system, with additional stations

Docklands Light Railway – Overview

The DLR is long, with 45 stations. There are six branches: to Lewisham station|Lewisham in the south, and Stratford International in the north, and Woolwich Arsenal station|Woolwich Arsenal in the east, and Central London in the west, splitting to and . Although the layout allows many different routes, the seven following are operated in normal service:

Docklands Light Railway – Overview

* Stratford International to Woolwich Arsenal (weekday peak hours only)

Docklands Light Railway – Overview

There is capability for an additional shuttle from Canning Town to Prince Regent when exhibitions are in progress at the ExCeL London|ExCeL exhibition centre.

Docklands Light Railway – Overview

At terminal stations trains reverse direction in the platforms except at Bank where there is a reversing headshunt beyond the station

Docklands Light Railway – Overview

The northern, southern and south-eastern branches terminate at the National Rail stations at Stratford, Stratford International, Lewisham and Woolwich Arsenal. Other interchanges with National Rail are at Limehouse station|Limehouse, Greenwich station|Greenwich and West Ham station|West Ham.

Docklands Light Railway – Stations

Most stations are Elevated railway|elevated, with others at street level, in cutting or underground. Access to the platforms is mostly by staircase and lift, with escalators at some stations. From the outset the system has been fully accessible to wheelchairs; much attention was paid to quick and effective accessibility for all passengers. The stations have high platforms matching the floor height of the cars, allowing level access for passengers with wheelchairs or pushchairs.

Docklands Light Railway – Stations

Most stations are of a modular design dating back to the initial system, extended and improved with two side platforms, each with separate access from the street, and platform canopies, although few examples remain of the original, distinctive rounded roof design

Docklands Light Railway – Stations

On 3 July 2007, DLR officially launched an art programme called DLR Art, similar to that on the London Underground, Art on the Underground. Alan Williams was appointed to produce the first temporary commission, called Sidetrack, which portrays the ordinary and extraordinary sights, often unfamiliar to passengers, on the system and was displayed throughout the network.

Docklands Light Railway – Fares and ticketing

The system is part of the London Underground ticketing#Fare zones|London fare zone system, and Travelcards that cover the appropriate zones are valid

Docklands Light Railway – Performance

Within a year of launch, annual passenger numbers were 17million. This increased to 64million in 2009 and more than 80million in 2011.www.flagshipconsulting.co.uk/media-centre/client-news/dlr-now-carries-more-than-10-times-the-population-of-london-per-year/ While the first five years were plagued by unreliability and operational problems, the system has now become highly reliable. In 2008, 87% of the population of North Woolwich were in favour of the DLR.

Docklands Light Railway – Performance

The Parliamentary Transport Select Committee has reviewed light rail. Due to the success of the DLR, proposals for similar systems elsewhere have emerged. The North and West London Light Railway is a plan for an orbital railway serving the other side of London.

Docklands Light Railway – Performance

The DLR has been successful, as have other recent light rail systems. However, the DLR has been criticised for having been designed with insufficient capacity to meet the demand that quickly arose. The level of demand was underestimated. In 1989 such criticism was aimed at General Electric Company plc|GEC, a major contractor for construction.

Docklands Light Railway – Performance

Until 1 July 2013, the only bicycles that were allowed were folding ones

Docklands Light Railway – Rolling stock

Each car has four doors on each side, and two or three cars make up a train.[http://www.railway-technology.com/projects/docklands/specs.html DLR Key Facts]

Docklands Light Railway – Rolling stock

Despite having high floors and being automated, the cars are derived from a German light rail|light-rail design intended for street running. All cars look similar but there have been several different types, some still in service, others sold to other operators. B2007 units were purchased from Bombardier Inc.|Bombardier in 2005 and delivered between 2007 and 2010.

Docklands Light Railway – Depots

The Poplar depot, which is also the operating headquarters of Docklands Light Railway Ltd and Serco Docklands, houses diesel locomotives used for track maintenance

Docklands Light Railway – Depots

One of the diesel locos stabled at Poplar DLR depot|Poplar is 1979 GEC Traction 0-4-0. One of three built for Shotton Steelworks.

Docklands Light Railway – Depots

Since they were used at the steelworks, one has been scrapped, one has recently been acquired by the Yorkshire Wolds Railway and the third is now at Poplar named Kevin Keaney.

Docklands Light Railway – Signalling technology

Originally the DLR used Railway signalling|signalling based on a Railway signalling#Fixed block|fixed-block technology developed by General Electric Company plc|GEC-General Signal and General Railway Signal

Docklands Light Railway – Current developments

With the development of the eastern Docklands as part of the Thames Gateway initiative and London’s staging of the 2012 Summer Olympics, several extensions and enhancements are under construction, being planned or being discussed.

Docklands Light Railway – Upgrading entire system to three-car trains

Capacity has been increased by upgrading for three-car trains

Docklands Light Railway – Upgrading entire system to three-car trains

Elverson Road, Pudding Mill Lane (Stratford-bound platform), Royal Albert, Gallions Reach and Cutty Sark have not been extended for three-car trains; such extension may be impossible in some cases

Docklands Light Railway – Upgrading entire system to three-car trains

For this upgrade DLR purchased an additional 31 cars compatible with existing rolling stock

Docklands Light Railway – Stratford International extension

The extension to Stratford International station|Stratford International, taking over the North London Line from Canning Town to Stratford, links the Docklands area with domestic high-speed services on High Speed 1

Docklands Light Railway – Stratford International extension

From Canning Town to Stratford the extension runs parallel to the London Underground (Jubilee line). As well as providing interchange with the adjacent Jubilee line stations, there are additional DLR stations at Star Lane, Abbey Road and Stratford High Street.

Docklands Light Railway – Stratford International extension

At Stratford new platforms have been built for the North London Line at the northern end of the station

Docklands Light Railway – Relocation of Pudding Mill Lane station

:’Status’ – Under construction

Docklands Light Railway – Relocation of Pudding Mill Lane station

When Crossrail is built, one of its tunnel portals will be on the site of Pudding Mill Lane station

Docklands Light Railway – Dagenham Dock extension

:’Status’ – Not currently being developed

Docklands Light Railway – Dagenham Dock extension

As shown in DLR’s first consultation leaflet, there are proposals to extend further, possibly to or Rainham railway station (London)|Rainham, or even to the other side of the Thames, including one or two new stations at Thamesmead, and then on to Abbey Wood station|Abbey Wood, for North Kent Line services to Dartford and Medway|The Medway Towns, as well as Crossrail connections.[http://developments.dlr.co.uk/pdf/extensions/dagenham/DDmap.pdf DLR Dagenham Dock extension preferred alignment]

Docklands Light Railway – Dagenham Dock extension

Construction was not expected to start until 2013, and the earliest expected completion date was 2017

Docklands Light Railway – Dagenham Dock extension

In October 2009, the plan had seemed to be once again under consideration. The Mayor’s Transport Strategy stated that the Mayor, through Transport for London, would investigate the feasibility of the extension to Dagenham Dock as part of the housing proposals for Barking Riverside.

Docklands Light Railway – Thames Wharf station

p 63 Subsequently the name was transferred to a potential future development on the London City Airport extension between and , due west of the western end of Royal Victoria Dock

Docklands Light Railway – Connaught Road/Silvertown Interchange station

A site near to London City Airport has been identified as a possible additional station on the London City Airport branch

Docklands Light Railway – Victoria/Charing Cross extensions

In February 2006 a proposal to extend the DLR to station from DLR branch was revealed

Docklands Light Railway – Victoria/Charing Cross extensions

While not confirmed, it is probable that the Charing Cross scheme would use the overrun tunnels between Charing Cross Jubilee platforms and slightly west of

Docklands Light Railway – Victoria/Charing Cross extensions

Two reasons driving the proposal are capacity problems at Bank, having just one interchange between the DLR and the central portion of London Underground|Underground, and the difficult journeys faced by passengers from Kent and South Coast between their rail termini and the DLR. Intermediate stations would be at City Thameslink railway station|City Thameslink/Ludgate Circus and Aldwych station|Aldwych, which was intended for future connection with the proposed but now abandoned Cross River Tram.

Docklands Light Railway – Euston/St Pancras extension

Recent strategy documents have proposed a DLR extension to and .[http://londonist.com/2011/05/tfl-moots-new-dlr-routes-including-victoria-and-st-pancras.php TfL Moots New DLR Routes, Including Victoria And St Pancras] Transport for London have considered driving a line from via north to the rail termini

Docklands Light Railway – Lewisham to Catford/Lewisham to Beckenham Junction extension

This possible extension was considered during the latest Horizon Study. The route would follow the Southeastern (train operating company)|Southeastern line and terminate between and stations. It has been seen as attractive to the district, as has the current terminus at Lewisham, built in an earlier extension. A map published in 2010 by Transport for London suggests that a further extension from Catford to has also been considered.

Docklands Light Railway – Lewisham to Catford/Lewisham to Beckenham Junction extension

However, early plans showed problems due to station being only marginally lower than the busy A20 road, which impedes any extension. The plan is however being revised. When the Lewisham extension was first completed there were proposals to continue further to Beckenham to link it up with the Tramlink system. However, the way in which Lewisham station was built impedes this possible extension and it would prove costly to redevelop.

Docklands Light Railway – Lewisham to Bromley North extension

Another proposal is to by taking over the Bromley North Line, a short National Rail branch line which has no direct services to London

Docklands Light Railway – Overrun of station buffers

The train was being driven manually at the time.[http://catless.ncl.ac.uk/Risks/5.29.html#subj3 London Docklands Light Railway; Northern Line’s Dot-Matrix Indicators] RISKS Digest Volume 5 Issue 29 Article 3, 13 August 1987Report on the Docklands Light Railway Accident Which Occurred at Island Gardens Station on 10 March 1987, Modern Railways (London), May 1987.’Unauthorised Tests’ Caused DLR Crash, Modern Railways (London), June 1987.

Docklands Light Railway – Collision at West India Quay bridge

On 22 April 1991, two trains collided at a junction on the bridge during morning rush hour, requiring a shutdown of the system and evacuation of passengers by ladder. One train was travelling automatically, while the other was under manual control.

Docklands Light Railway – South Quay bombing

On 9 February 1996, the Provisional Irish Republican Army blew up a lorry under a bridge near , killing two people and injuring many others. The blast caused £85million of damage and marked an end to the IRA ceasefire. Significant disruption was caused and a train was stranded at Island Gardens, unable to move until the track was rebuilt.

Docklands Light Railway – Management

Prior to 1997 the DLR was a wholly owned subsidiary of London Regional Transport. In 1992 it was transferred to the London Docklands Development Corporation, sponsored by the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs|Department of Environment.

Docklands Light Railway – Management

The first concession was awarded to Serco Docklands Limited[http://data.companieshouse.gov.uk/doc/company/03145194 Companies House extract company no 3145194] for seven years; operations began in April 1997.[http://www.serco.com/media/pressreleases/archive/1997/008_1997.asp Acquisition of DRML Shares] Serco A management buyout backed by Serco Group|Serco management later sold its shares to Serco

Docklands Light Railway – Management

In February 2005 Transport for London announced Balfour Beatty/Keolis, Carillion|First Carillion, RATP Group|RATP/Transdev and Serco had been shortlisted to operate the concession.

Docklands Light Railway – Management

In November 2005 Transport for London announced Serco had retained the concession for seven years from May 2006.

Docklands Light Railway – Management

However, in 2011, Transport Trading Limited (a subsidiary of Transport for London)[http://www.tfl.gov.uk/assets/downloads/corporate/tfl-subsidiary-organisation.pdf TfL Subsidiary Company Structure] Transport for London purchased the companies responsible for the City Airport and Woolwich Arsenal extensions leaving only the Lewisham extension under private ownership.[http://www.railwaygazette.com/news/single-view/view/tfl-expects-pound250m-saving-from-buying-docklands-light-railway-pfi-concessionaries.html TfL expects £250m saving from buying Docklands Light Railway PFI concessionaires] Railway Gazette 6 December 2011

Docklands Light Railway – Management

In January 2013 Serco’s contract was extended until September 2014. In July 2012 Transport for London called for expressions of interest in bidding for the next DLR concession,[http://www.tendersdirect.co.uk/Search/Tenders/Live.aspx?ID=%20000000003807322sect=R009cat=37Source=Categories Docklands Light Rail franchise contract] OJEU tender 13 July 2012

Docklands Light Railway – Management

In April 2013 Transport for London announced Go-Ahead Group|Go-Ahead/Colas Rail, Keolis/Amey plc|Amey Rail, Serco and Stagecoach Group|Stagecoach had been shortlisted to bid for the concession commencing on 14 September 2014.[http://www.tfl.gov.uk/corporate/media/newscentre/27761.aspx DLR announces short list of bidders for new franchise] Transport for London 17 April 2013 However, on 30 August, just over a week before the bid submission date of 9 September 2013, Go-Ahead Group|Go-Ahead/Colas Rail pulled out of the running.

Liverpool – Waterfront and docks

North of the city centre is Stanley Dock, home to the Stanley Dock Tobacco Warehouse, which was at the time of its construction in 1901, the world’s largest building in terms of areaNicholls, p38 and today stands as the world’s largest brick-work building.

Liverpool – Waterfront and docks

One of the most famous locations in Liverpool is the Pier Head, renowned for the trio of buildings – the Royal Liver Building, the Cunard Building and the Port of Liverpool Building – which sit upon it

Liverpool – Waterfront and docks

In recent years, several areas along Liverpool’s waterfront have undergone significant redevelopment. Amongst the notable recent developments are the construction of the Echo Arena Liverpool and BT Convention Centre on King’s Dock, Port of Liverpool|Kings Dock, Alexandra Tower, Liverpool|Alexandra Tower and 1 Princes Dock on Princes Dock and Liverpool Marina around Coburg Dock|Coburg and Brunswick Docks.

International Space Station – Docking

NASA Shuttles could remain docked for 11–12 days.

International Space Station – Docking

The American manual approach to docking allows greater initial flexibility and less complexity

International Space Station – Docking

Soyuz manned spacecraft for crew rotation also serve as lifeboats for emergency evacuation; they are replaced every six months and have been used once to remove excess crew after the Space Shuttle Columbia disaster|Columbia disaster

International Space Station – Docking

From 26 February 2011 to 7 March 2011 four of the governmental partners (United States, ESA, Japan and Russia) had their spacecraft (NASA Shuttle, ATV, HTV, Progress and Soyuz) docked at the ISS, the only time this has happened to date. On 25 May 2012, SpaceX became the world’s first privately held company to send a cargo load, via the Dragon (spacecraft)|Dragon spacecraft, to the International Space Station.

International Space Station – Launch and docking windows

When a NASA shuttle docked to the station, other ships were grounded, as the carbon wingtips, cameras, windows, and instruments aboard the shuttle were at too much risk from damage from thruster residue from other ships movements.

International Space Station – Launch and docking windows

Approximately 30% of NASA shuttle launch delays were caused by poor weather

Ferry – Docking

Ferry boats often dock at specialized facilities designed to position the boat for loading and unloading, called a ferry slip

Dry dock

A ‘drydock’ (also commonly ‘dry dock’) is a narrow basin or vessel that can be flooded to allow a load to be floated in, then drained to allow that load to come to rest on a dry platform. Drydocks are used for the construction, maintenance, and repair of ships, boats, and other watercraft.

Dry dock – Greco-Roman world

According to the ancient Greek author Athenaeus of Naucratis (V 204c-d), the drydock was invented in Ptolemaic Egypt, some time after the death of Ptolemy IV Philopator (reigned 221-204 BC):

Dry dock – Greco-Roman world

Since Athenaeus recorded the event 400 years later (around 200 AD), there is sufficient reason to believe that drydocks had been known throughout classical antiquity. The Roman shipyard of Stifone (Narni)|Roman shipyard at Narni, Italy, which is still being studied, may have served as a dry dock.

Dry dock – China

The use of drydocks in Science and technology in China#Ancient and imperial China|China goes at least as far back the 10th century A.D. In 1088, Song Dynasty scientist and statesman Shen Kuo (1031–1095) wrote in his Dream Pool Essays:

Dry dock – Renaissance Europe

The first early modern European and oldest surviving drydock still in use was commissioned by Henry VII of England at HMNB Portsmouth in 1495 (see Tudor navy). This drydock currently holds the world’s oldest commissioned warship, HMS Victory.

Dry dock – Renaissance Europe

Possibly the earliest description of a floating dock comes from a small Italian book printed in Venice in 1560, called Descrittione dell’artifitiosa machina

Dry dock – Modern times

The Alfredo da Silva Dry Dock, of the Lisnave Dockyards in Almada, Portugal, was the largest in the world until 2000, when it was closed after the moving of Lisnave operations to Setúbal.

Dry dock – Modern times

Currently, Harland and Wolff Heavy Industries in Belfast, Northern Ireland, is the site of the largest drydock in the world. The Samson and Goliath (cranes)|massive cranes are named after the Biblical figures Samson and Goliath. Goliath stands 96m tall, while Samson is taller at 106m.

Dry dock – Modern times

Dry Dock 12 at Newport News Shipbuilding is the largest drydock in the Western Hemisphere. The Saint-Nazaire’s Chantiers de l’Atlantique owns one of the biggest in the world: . The largest graving dock of the Mediterranean as of 2009 is at the Hellenic Shipyards S.A. (HSY S.A., Athens, Greece)[http://www.hellenic-shipyards.gr/pg/repairs.htm]. The by far largest roofed dry dock is at the German Meyer Werft Shipyard in Papenburg, Germany, it is 504m long, 125m wide and stands 75m tall.

Dry dock – Graving

More routine use of drydocks is for the cleaning (removal of barnacles and rust) and re-painting of ship’s hulls.

Dry dock – Graving

Some fine-tuning of the ship’s position can be done by scuba diving|divers while there is still some water left to manoeuvre it about. It is extremely important that supporting blocks conform to the structural members so that the ship is not damaged when its weight is supported by the blocks. Some anti-submarine warfare warships have protruding sonar domes, requiring that the hull of the ship be supported several metres from the bottom of the drydock.

Dry dock – Graving

Once the remainder of the water is pumped out, the ship can be freely inspected or serviced. When work on the ship is finished, water is allowed to re-enter the dry dock and the ship is carefully refloated.

Dry dock – Graving

Modern graving docks are box-shaped, to accommodate the newer, boxier ship designs, whereas old drydocks are often shaped like the ships that are planned to be docked there. This shaping was advantageous because such a dock was easier to build, it was easier to side-support the ships, and less water had to be pumped away.

Dry dock – Graving

Another advantage of covered drydocks is that work can take place independently of the weather; this is frequently used by modern shipyards for construction especially of complex, high-value vessels like cruise ships where delays would incur a high cost.

Dry dock – Floating

When the water is pumped out of the chambers, the drydock rises and the ship is lifted out of the water on the rising deck, allowing work to proceed on the ship’s hull.

Dry dock – Floating

For smaller boats, one-piece floating drydocks can be constructed, potentially coming with their own bow and steering mechanism.

Dry dock – Floating

One of these, the 850-foot AFDB-3, an ‘Advance Base Sectional Dock’, saw action in Guam, was mothballed near Norfolk, Virginia|Norfolk, Virginia, and was eventually towed to Portland, Maine|Portland, Maine, to become part of Bath Iron Works’ repair facilities.[http://www.navybook.com/nohigherhonor/pic-ffg58repair.shtml Photos of USS Samuel B

Dry dock – Floating

The Hughes Mining Barge, or HMB-1, is a covered, floating drydock that is also submersible to support the secret transfer of a mechanical lifting device underneath the Glomar Explorer ship, as well as the development of the Sea Shadow stealth ship.

Dry dock – Alternative drydock systems

Apart from graving docks and floating drydocks, ships can also be drydocked and launched by:

Dry dock – Alternative drydock systems

* Marine railway — For repair of larger ships up to about 3000 tons ship weight

Dry dock – Alternative drydock systems

* Shiplift — For repair as well as for newbuilding. From 800 to 25000 ton shipweight

Dry dock – Alternative drydock systems

* Slipway, patent slip — For repair of smaller boats and the newbuilding launch of larger vessels

Dry dock – Uses other than for ships

Some drydocks are used during the construction of bridges, dams, and other large objects. For example, the drydock on the artificial island of Neeltje-Jans was used for the construction of the Oosterscheldekering, a large dam in the Netherlands that consists of 65 concrete pillars weighing 18,000 tonnes each. The pillars were constructed in a drydock and towed to their final place on the seabed.

Dry dock – Uses other than for ships

A drydock may also be used for the prefabrication of the elements of an immersed tube tunnel, before they are floated into position, as was done with Boston’s Silver Line (MBTA)|Silver Line.

Notebook computers – Docking stations

Both docking stations and port replicators are intended to be used at a permanent working place (a desk) to offer instant connection to multiple input/output devices and to extend a laptop’s capabilities.

DisplayPort – DockPort

DockPort, formerly known as Lightning Bolt, is an extension to DisplayPort to include USB 3.0 data as well as power for charging portable devices from attached external displays. Originally developed by AMD and Texas Instruments, it has been announced as a VESA specification in 2014.

Trover – Dockwray v Dickinson 1697

In Dockwray v Dickinson , it was held that where the facts indicated a conversion of a ship and cargo that the plaintiff was entitled to interest in one-sixteenth of the value of the property

Ian Murdock

‘Ian Murdock’ (born April 28, 1973) is the founder of the Debian project and Progeny Linux Systems, a commercial Linux company.

Ian Murdock – Life and career

Ian Ashley Murdock was born in Konstanz, West Germany on April 28, 1973. He wrote the Debian#cite_note-42|Debian Manifesto in 1993 while a student at Purdue University, where he earned his bachelor’s degree in computer science in 1996. He named Debian after his then-girlfriend Debra Lynn, and himself (Deb and Ian). They subsequently married (between 1993 – 1996), filed for divorce on the week of August 10, 2007,. and were granted the divorce in January, 2008..

Ian Murdock – Life and career

On joining Sun, he led Project Indiana, which he described as taking the lesson that Linux has brought to the operating system and providing that for Solaris, making a full OpenSolaris distribution with GNOME and User space|userland tools from GNU plus a network-based package management system.. From March 2007 to February 2010, he was Vice President of Emerging Platforms at Sun,. until the company merged with Oracle and he resigned his position with the company.

Ian Murdock – Life and career

Murdock is Vice President of Platform and Developer Community at ExactTarget, based in Indianapolis.[http://www.linkedin.com/in/imurdock Ian Murdock Profile]. LinkedIn. Retrieved on 2011-11-21.

Puppy – Docking and declawing

Docking and declawing procedures are usually performed within the first few days after birth, by a veterinarian, or by an experienced breeder.

History of manufactured gas – William Murdock and Boulton Watt

William Murdoch (sometimes Murdock) (1754–1839) was an engineer working for the firm of Boulton Watt, when, while investigating distillation processes sometime in 1792–1794, he also started to use coal gas for illumination

History of manufactured gas – William Murdock and Boulton Watt

After an initial installation at the Soho Foundry in 1803–1804, Boulton Watt prepared an apparatus for the textile firm of Philips Lee in Salford near Manchester in 1805–1806

Cross docking

‘Cross-docking’ is a practice in logistics of unloading materials from an incoming semi-trailer truck or railroad car and loading these materials directly into outbound trucks, trailers, or rail cars, with little or no storage in between. This may be done to change type of conveyance, to sort material intended for different destinations, or to combine material from different origins into transport vehicles (or containers) with the same, or similar destination.

Cross docking

Cross-Dock operations were first pioneered in the US trucking industry in the 1930s, and have been in continuous use in LTL (less than truckload) operations ever since.

Cross docking

The US military began utilizing cross-dock operations in the 1950s. Wal-Mart began utilizing cross-docking in the retail sector in the late 1980s.

Cross docking

In the LTL trucking industry, cross-docking is done by moving cargo from one transport vehicle directly into another, with minimal or no warehousing. In retail practice, cross-docking operations may utilize staging areas where inbound materials are sorted, consolidated, and stored until the outbound shipment is complete and ready to ship.

Cross docking – Advantages of retail cross-docking

* Streamlines the supply chain from point of origin to point of sale

Cross docking – Advantages of retail cross-docking

* Reduces labor costs through less inventory handling

Cross docking – Advantages of retail cross-docking

* Reduces inventory holding costs through reduced storage times and potentially eliminating the need to retain safety stock

Cross docking – Advantages of retail cross-docking

* Products get to the distributor and consequently to the customer faster

Cross docking – Advantages of retail cross-docking

* Reduces, or eliminates warehousing costs

Cross docking – Disadvantages of cross-docking

* Need for a Computer-based information technology|computerized logistics system

Cross docking – Disadvantages of cross-docking

* Additional freight handling can lead to product damage

Cross docking – Typical applications

*Spoke-hub distribution paradigm|Hub and spoke arrangements, where materials are brought in to one central location and then sorted for delivery to a variety of destinations

Cross docking – Typical applications

Using the cross-dock technique, Wal-Mart was able to effectively leverage their logistical volume into a core strategic competency.

Cross docking – Typical applications

* Wal Mart operates an extensive satellite network of distribution centers serviced by company owned trucks

Cross docking – Typical applications

* Each register is directly connected to a satellite system sending sales information to Wal Mart’s headquarters and distribution centers.

Cross docking – Factors influencing the use of retail crossdocks

* Cross-docking is dependent on continuous communication between suppliers, distribution centers, and all points of sale.

Cross docking – Factors influencing the use of retail crossdocks

* Customer and supplier geography—particularly when a single corporate customer has many multiple branches or using points

Cross docking – Factors influencing the use of retail crossdocks

* Logistics software integration between supplier(s), vendor, and shipper

Cross docking – Crossdock facility design

[http://transci.journal.informs.org/cgi/content/abstract/38/2/235#otherarticles The Best Shape for a Crossdock] Transportation Scipp

Gateway Project – Newark Penn, Dock Bridge, Harrison PATH Station

Six tracks connect Newark Penn Station and the adjacent Dock Bridge over the Passaic River

Gloucester Docks

‘Gloucester’ ( ) is a city status in the United Kingdom|city, Non-metropolitan district|district and county town of Gloucestershire in the South West England|South West region of England. Gloucester lies close to the Welsh border, and on the River Severn, approximately north-east of Bristol, and south-southwest of Birmingham.

Gloucester Docks

A cathedral city, capital of its county which was built on a flat spot of land, Gloucester is situated on the River Severn and the Bristol and Birmingham Railway.

Gloucester Docks

Gloucester was founded in AD 97 by the Roman Empire|Romans under Emperor Nerva as Colonia Glevum Nervensis, and was granted its first charter in 1155 by Henry II of England|King Henry II. Economically, the city is dominated by the service industries, and has a strong financial and business sector, being home to the bank Cheltenham Gloucester and historically was prominent in the aerospace industry.[http://www.glosfirst.co.uk/docs/Technical%20Appendix%202%20Fin%20March%202005.pdf ]

Gloucester Docks – Saxon times

Gloucester (Glowancestre, 1282) derives from the Anglo-Saxon for fort (Old English ceaster) preceded by the Roman stem Glev- (pronounced glaiw).Kenneth Cameron: English Place Names In Old Welsh language|Old Welsh, the city was known as Caerloyw, caer = castle, and loyw from gloyw = glowing/bright

Gloucester Docks – Saxon times

In the early tenth century the remains of Oswald of Northumbria|Saint Oswald were brought to a small church in Gloucester, bringing many pilgrims to the town.

Gloucester Docks – Saxon times

The core street layout dates back to the reign of Ethelfleda in late Saxon times.

Gloucester Docks – Medieval times

During the Anarchy, Gloucester was a centre of support for the Empress Matilda.Gesta Stephani, §47

Gloucester Docks – Medieval times

The first Earl of Gloucester, Earl Godwin, Earl of Wessex|Godwine, was succeeded nearly a century later by Robert, 1st Earl of Gloucester|Robert of Gloucester

Gloucester Docks – Medieval times

In the Middle Ages the main export was wool which came from the Cotswolds and was processed in Gloucester; other exports included leather and iron (tools and weapons). Gloucester also had a large fishing industry at that time.

Gloucester Docks – Medieval times

In 1223 thatched roofs were banned after a massive fire that destroyed a part of Gloucester.

Gloucester Docks – Medieval times

In November 2011 a unique coin, dated to 1077–1080, was discovered, just north of the city, featuring the name of the moneyer Silacwine and its place of minting. The Portable Antiquities Scheme said that, until the coin was discovered, there had been no known examples of William I of England|William I coins minted in Gloucester in this period.[http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-gloucestershire-17027300 ‘Unique’ 11th Century coin discovered near Gloucester at bbc.co.uk]

Gloucester Docks – Tudor and Stuart times

Subsequent charters were numerous. Gloucester was incorporated by Richard III of England|King Richard III in 1483, the town being made a county corporate|county in itself. This charter was confirmed in 1489 and 1510, and other charters of incorporation were received by Gloucester from Elizabeth I of England|Queen Elizabeth I and James I of England|King James I.

Gloucester Docks – Tudor and Stuart times

Gloucester was the site of the execution by burning of John Hooper, Bishop of Gloucester in the time of Mary I of England|Queen Mary and martyred by her in 1555.

Gloucester Docks – Tudor and Stuart times

In 1580 Gloucester was awarded the status of a port by Queen Elizabeth I.

Gloucester Docks – Tudor and Stuart times

The Siege of Gloucester in 1643 was a battle of the English Civil War in which the besieged parliamentarians emerged victorious.

Gloucester Docks – Modern history

The spring of 1994 saw the arrest of Fred West and his wife Rosemary West for the murder of 12 women and girls who went missing between 1967 and 1987– including two of their daughters. Their home, 25 Cromwell Street, where the remains of many of the victims were buried, was later demolished and a public walkway laid in its place.

Gloucester Docks – Modern history

In 2007 United Kingdom Floods|July 2007, Gloucester was hit badly by a Summer 2007 United Kingdom floods#Gloucestershire|flood that struck Gloucestershire and its surrounding areas. Hundreds of homes were flooded, but the event was most memorable because of its wider impact– about 40,000 people were without power for 24 hours, and the entire city (plus surrounding areas) was without piped water for 17 days.

Gloucester Docks – Modern history

In 2009, Gloucester Day was revived as an annual day of celebration of Gloucester’s history and culture. The day originally dates from the lifting of the Siege of Gloucester in 1643, during which the city held out against Royalist forces during the First English Civil War.[http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/gloucestershire/8239588.stm Tradition revived for city pride.] BBC News, 5 September 2009. Retrieved 11 September 2011.

Gloucester Docks – Climate

Gloucester experiences an oceanic climate (Köppen climate classification Cfb).

Gloucester Docks – Gloucester Cathedral

Gloucester Cathedral, in the north of the city near the river, originates in the foundation of an abbey dedicated to Saint Peter in 681

Gloucester Docks – Gloucester Cathedral

Attached to the deanery is the Normans|Norman prior’s chapel. In St Mary’s Square outside the Abbey gate, the Bishop of Gloucester, Bishop John Hooper, was martyred under Mary I of England|Queen Mary I in 1555.

Gloucester Docks – Medieval and Tudor buildings

Many medieval and Tudor period gabled and half timbered houses survive from earlier periods of Gloucester’s history

Gloucester Docks – Churches

There may be many churches now, but in the past there were also many dissenting chapels. It may have been the old proverb as sure as God’s in Gloucester that provoked Oliver Cromwell to declare that the city had more churches than godliness. Gloucester was the host of the first Sunday school in England; this was founded by Robert Raikes in 1780. Four of the churches that are of special interest are

Gloucester Docks – Churches

* St Mary de Lode Church|St Mary de Lode– with a Norman architecture|Norman tower and chancel, and a monument of Bishop John Hooper. It was built on the site of an ancient Ancient Rome|Roman temple which became the first Christian church in Britain

Gloucester Docks – Churches

* St Mary de Crypt Church|St Mary de Crypt– with a cruciform structure of the 12th century. It has later additions, such as the tower. Also the site of the Schoolroom in which The Crypt School, Gloucester|The Crypt School was formed

Gloucester Docks – Churches

* The St Michael church – said to have been connected with the St Peter ancient abbey

Gloucester Docks – Churches

* The St Nicholas’ Church, Gloucester|St Nicholas church – founded by the Normans but with many additions since then.

Gloucester Docks – Churches

In the neighbourhood around St Mary de Crypt there are slight remains of Greyfriars and Blackfriars, Gloucester|Blackfriars monasteries, and also of the city wall. Under the Golden Fleece (The Monks Bar) and Saracen’s Head inns early vaulted cellars still remain.

Gloucester Docks – Churches

During the construction of the Boots store on the corner of Brunswick Road and Eastgate Street in 1974, Roman remains were found. These can be seen through a glass case on the street. At the back of the Gloucester Furniture Exhibition Centre part of the city’s south gate can be seen.

Gloucester Docks – Schools

See also List of schools in the South West of England#Gloucestershire|List of schools in Gloucestershire.

Gloucester Docks – Schools

There are three endowed schools: The King’s School, Gloucester|The King’s School, refounded by Henry VIII of England as part of the cathedral establishment; the school of The Crypt School, Gloucester|St Mary de Crypt now known as The Crypt School, Gloucester since it moved to a mile from town centre to Podsmead, founded by Dame Joan Cooke in the same reign (1539), Sir Thomas Rich’s School, previously known as Sir Thomas Rich’s Bluecoat Hospital for Boys (1666); The High School for Girls (1883) ; and Ribston Hall High School for girls.

Gloucester Docks – Schools

Comprehensives include Millbrook Academy, Beaufort School|Beaufort Co-operative Academy, St Peter’s High School, Gloucester|St Peter’s High School (Catholic school), Chosen Hill School, Severn Vale School, Gloucester Academy, Barnwood Park Arts College, and Churchdown School Academy.

Gloucester Docks – Modern buildings

Noteworthy modern buildings include the museum and school of art and science, the Gloucester (HM Prison)|county jail (on the site of a Saxon people|Saxon and Norman architecture|Norman castle), the Shire Hall and the Whitefield memorial church

Gloucester Docks – Modern buildings

King’s Square is at the heart of the city centre and occupies what was once a cattle market and bus station

Gloucester Docks – Modern buildings

An indoor market opened in Eastgate Street in 1968, followed by the Eastgate Shopping Centre in 1974

Gloucester Docks – Modern buildings

Gloucester Leisure Centre opened on the corner of Eastgate Street and Bruton Way in September 1974 and was redeveloped and rebranded (as GL1) in August 2002

Gloucester Docks – Modern buildings

The 1966 Heights Plan for Gloucester sought to restrict construction of tall buildings and defend spiritual values by protecting views of Gloucester Cathedral

Gloucester Docks – Bus and coach

Public transport in the city is run by Stagecoach Group|Stagecoach, operating from its depot on London Road.

Gloucester Docks – Bus and coach

For longer journeys, National Express operate a number of services including the 444 to London and the National Express Coach route 222|222 to Heathrow and Gatwick airports.

Gloucester Docks – Waterways

Gloucester Docks mark the Normal Tidal Limit (NTL) of the river.[http://getamap.ordnancesurvey.co.uk/getamap/frames.htm?mapAction=gazgazName=pgazString=GLOUCESTER getamap.ordnancesurvey.co.uk/getamap/frames.htm?mapAction=gazgazName=pgazString=GLOUCESTER%5D getamap.ordnancesurvey.co.uk

Gloucester Docks – Waterways

Gloucester was formerly linked to Ledbury and Hereford by the Herefordshire and Gloucestershire Canal; and subsequently by the Ledbury and Gloucester Railway, which used the southern section of the former canal, until it also closed in 1964. This canal is now being restored, and the restored canal basin in the Gloucester suburb of Over is a local attraction.

Gloucester Docks – Rail

The city is also served by Gloucester railway station, with frequent services to some of the country’s largest cities, London Paddington|London, Reading station|Reading, Bristol Temple Meads|Bristol, Cardiff Central railway station|Cardiff, and Birmingham New Street|Birmingham. Gloucester was the site of the Gloucester Railway Carriage and Wagon Company railway works, which have now closed.

Gloucester Docks – Road

Gloucester is served by the M5 motorway, which runs to the east of the city

Gloucester Docks – Road

Until the construction of the Severn Bridge in 1966, Gloucester was the lowest bridging point on the river and hence was an important settlement on the route between London and South Wales

Gloucester Docks – Business and industry

Gloucester has a long history in the aerospace business

Gloucester Docks – Business and industry

Messier-Dowty’s landing gear plant and Smiths Aerospace Dowty Rotol|Dowty Propellers plants are on the outskirts of the city.

Gloucester Docks – Business and industry

Gloucester is home to the headquarters of Cheltenham Gloucester at Barnwood, a major mortgage lender, and now a subsidiary of Lloyds TSB. The large insurer Ecclesiastical Insurance is based in the city, as is its owner, the charity Allchurches Trust.

Gloucester Docks – Business and industry

Gloucester was the home of Priday, Metford and Company Limited, a family milling firm which survived for over one hundred years, and hydraulic engineering firm Fielding Platt.

Gloucester Docks – Business and industry

Gloucester Business Park is a business park on the outskirts on the city and is home to a number of big brands including Fortis (finance)|Fortis and Detica.

Gloucester Docks – Sport and leisure

*Kingsholm Stadium is the ground of Gloucester Rugby, founded in 1873, one of Europe’s top rugby union clubs and a member of the Aviva Premiership.

Gloucester Docks – Sport and leisure

*Meadow Park was the home of Gloucester City A.F.C., founded in 1883, of the Conference North. The club currently play matches at arch rivals Cheltenham Town’s Whaddon Road Stadium in Cheltenham due to the 2007 Floods and have been homeless since then.

Gloucester Docks – Sport and leisure

*The Gloucestershire County Cricket Club|Gloucester Cricket Festival is held in Gloucester at the King’s School.

Gloucester Docks – Sport and leisure

*Public sports facilities are focused on the GL1 leisure centre, a large modern sports centre with several swimming pools, a multi-use sports hall, indoor bowls room, squash courts, gym and health spa. There is also a new Esporta complex in Brockworth.

Gloucester Docks – Sport and leisure

*The Matson, Gloucester|Matson district is home to Gloucester Ski and Snowboard Centre artificial ski slopes|dry slope skiing facility (with two slopes of 220m and 150m respectively down the side of Robinswood Hill) and an 18 hole golf course.

Gloucester Docks – Sport and leisure

*Gloucester City Swimming Club competes in county and national swimming (sport)|swimming championships, head coach is Graham Brookhouse, who won a Bronze Medal in the 1988 Summer Olympics|1988 Seoul Olympics.[http://www.gcsc.org.uk/default.htm Gloucester City Swimming Club]

Gloucester Docks – Sport and leisure

*Bentham Domes on the outskirts of Gloucester boasts one of the largest 5-a-side leagues in Europe.

Gloucester Docks – Sport and leisure

*The Gloucester Banshees American Football are based in the city at Oxstalls Tennis Centre, and play at a national level in the British American Football League

Gloucester Docks – Sport and leisure

*The Gloucester Vipers (seniors) Gloucester Boxers (junior) Skater Hockey Club. Compete in BIPHA (puck) BISHA (ball) leagues.

Gloucester Docks – Sport and leisure

*The University of Gloucestershire All-Golds is the city’s only professional rugby league club, playing in the semi professional Championship 1 from 2013.

Gloucester Docks – Media

The Citizen (Gloucester)|The Citizen, published by Northcliffe Media is Gloucester’s main daily newspaper, which shares some content with the Gloucestershire Echo and the weekly Forester covering the Forest of Dean and Chepstow.

Gloucester Docks – Media

BBC Radio Gloucestershire has its studios on London Road in Gloucester. Heart Gloucestershire, previously Severn Sound, is based in Eastgate Shopping Centre. Gloucester FM is a community radio station specialising in black and urban music. Sunshine Radio (FM)|Sunshine Radio, which broadcasts from Herefordshire and Monmouthshire, can be heard clearly across the county. It also broadcasts on the Gloucester DAB Multiplex.

Gloucester Docks – Media

Local radio is broadcast from transmitters on Churchdown#Churchdown_Hill|Churchdown Hill (Chosen Hill), and for television reception Gloucester is in a transmitter overlap area between Ridge Hill (Midlands) and Mendip (West), although the West regional broadcasts cover the city editorially.

Gloucester Docks – Media

A number of TV and film productions have been filmed in Gloucester; most notably at the Cathedral and Docks. These include three of the Harry Potter movies, Doctor Who and Outlaw (2007 film)|Outlaw.[http://www.gloucestershireonscreen.co.uk ‘Gloucester Film and TV Locations’] at Gloucestershire On Screen

Gloucester Docks – Culture

The Three Choirs Festival, originating in the eighteenth century and one of the oldest music festivals in Europe, is held in Gloucester every third year, the other venues being Hereford and Worcester. Gloucester hosted the festival in 2010, and it is next due in the city in 2013.

Gloucester Docks – Culture

The city’s main theatre and cultural venue is the Guildhall. The Guildhall hosts a huge amount of entertainment, including live music, dance sessions, a cinema, bar, café, art gallery and much more. The Leisure Centre, GL1, hosts concerts and has a larger capacity than the Guildhall.

Gloucester Docks – Culture

The annual Gloucester International Rhythm and Blues Festival takes place at the end of July and early August. [http://www.gloucesterblues.co.uk] Gloucester International Cajun and Zydeco Festival runs for a weekend in January each year.[http://www.gloucester.gov.uk/cajunfestival ] A Medieval Fayre is held in Westgate Street each year during the summer.

Gloucester Docks – Culture

The main museum in the City is the Gloucester City Museum Art Gallery but there are several other important museums.

Gloucester Docks – Culture

The Tailor of Gloucester House which is dedicated to the author Beatrix Potter can be found near the Cathedral.

Gloucester Docks – Culture

Nature in Art is a gallery dedicated to the display of works of art inspired by the natural world.

Gloucester Docks – Culture

A popular and well known rhyme about the city: Doctor Foster went to Gloucester in a shower of rain, he stood in a puddle right up to his middle and never went there again.

Gloucester Docks – Notable people

Notable residents of Gloucester have included:

Gloucester Docks – Notable people

* Hubert Cecil Booth (1871–1955), inventor of the vacuum cleaner

Gloucester Docks – Notable people

* Alex Cuthbert (1990–Present), Welsh international, British Irish Lions rugby player.

Gloucester Docks – Notable people

* Ivor Gurney (1890–1937), composer and poet

Gloucester Docks – Notable people

* Thomas Machen (c. 1541–1614), mayor of Gloucester three times and Member of Parliament|MP once

Gloucester Docks – Notable people

* Robert Raikes the Elder (1690–1757), the printer of Gloucester, founder of the Gloucester Journal, early pioneer of press freedom, buried in church of St Mary de Crypt Church|St Mary de Crypt

Gloucester Docks – Notable people

* Robert Raikes (1735–1811), English philanthropist and Anglican layman, noted for his promotion of Sunday schools

Gloucester Docks – Notable people

* Thomas Raikes (1741–1813), banker and merchant in London, who as Bank of England governor issued the first £1 and £2 English sterling banknotes|pound notes in 1797

Gloucester Docks – Notable people

* Nathan Sykes (singer)|Nathan Sykes (b. 1993), youngest member of British boyband The Wanted

Gloucester Docks – Notable people

* Mike Teague (b. 1960), former England rugby union footballer

Gloucester Docks – Notable people

* Fred West (1941–1995) and Rose West (b. 1953) serial killers who tortured, raped and murdered at least 12 young women.

Gloucester Docks – Notable people

* George Whitefield (1714–1770), Church of England minister and a leader in the Methodist movement

Gloucester Docks – Notable people

* Jemmy Wood (1756–1836), legendary miser and owner of the Gloucester Old Bank.

Gloucester Docks – Twin cities

Gloucester is Twin towns and sister cities|twinned with Metz, France, since 1967; Trier, Germany, since 1957; Saint Ann, Jamaica|Saint Ann, Jamaica, since 1987; and Gouda, Netherlands, since 1972.

Emirates Air Line (cable car) – Royal Docks

The eastern end of the cable car line () is at the Royal Docks, home to the ExCeL London|ExCeL Centre, which hosted a number of martial arts, boxing and weightlifting events during the 2012 London Olympics. The closest interchange to the Docklands Light Railway is at Royal Victoria DLR station|Royal Victoria station.

Chinese space station – Docking

Foreign sources have stated that the docking mechanism strongly resembles Androgynous Peripheral Attach System|APAS-89/APAS-95, with one United States of America|American source going as far as to call it a clone. There have been contradicting claims on the compatibility of the Chinese system with both current and future docking mechanisms on the ISS.

Bo?ek Do?kal

‘Bo?ek Do?kal’ (born 30 September 1988) is a Czech Republic|Czech association football|footballer who plays as a midfielder for AC Sparta Prague|Sparta Prague. He has previously spent time with Turkisk side Konyaspor and Norwegian side Rosenborg BK|Rosenborg. Do?kal represented the Czech Republic at youth international level, and was the captain of the Czech Republic national under-21 football team|under-21 team, and has later been capped with the senior team.

Bo?ek Do?kal – Club career

Do?kal began his football career in Pod?brady

Bo?ek Do?kal – Club career

Do?kal went on a one-year loan to Turkish Super League side Konyaspor in July 2010.

Bo?ek Do?kal – Club career

In August 2011 Do?kal signed a long term contract with Norway|Norwegian club side Rosenborg BK|Rosenborg.fotbal.idnes.cz/fotbalista-dockal-prestupuje-do-trondheimu-plzen-vsak-nepotrapi-pya-/fot_zahranici.aspx?c=A110802_163359_fot_zahranici_min He contributed with one assist in his first game, where Rosenborg won 3–1 over rivals Molde FK|Molde

Bo?ek Do?kal – International career

Do?kal was the captain and one of the key players in the Czech Republic national under-21 football team|Czech U-21 team. He represented the team at the 2011 UEFA European Under-21 Football Championship. Do?kal has also been capped for the Czech Republic national football team.

Bo?ek Do?kal – International goals

:Scores and results list Czech Republic’s goal tally first.

Dock (maritime)

A ‘dock’ (from Dutch language|Dutch dok) is a human-made structure or group of structures involved in the handling of boats or ships, usually on or close to a shore.

Dock (maritime)

However, the exact meaning varies among different variants of the English language. Dock may also refer to a dockyard or shipyard where the loading, unloading, building, or repairing of ships occurs.

Dock (maritime) – History

This was the earliest known dock found in the world, equipped to berth and service ships.Rao, pages 27–28 It is speculated that Lothal engineers studied tidal movements, and their effects on brick-built structures, since the walls are of kiln-burnt bricks

Dock (maritime) – British English

In British English, a dock is an enclosed area of water used for loading, unloading, building or repairing ships. Such a dock may be created by building enclosing harbour walls into an existing natural water space, or by excavation within what would otherwise be dry land.

Dock (maritime) – British English

There are specific types of dock structure where the water level is controlled:

Dock (maritime) – British English

The dock reduced ship waiting giving quick turn arounds, greatly improving the throughput of cargo.

Dock (maritime) – British English

*A drydock is another variant, also with dock gates, which can be emptied of water to allow investigation and maintenance of the underwater parts of ships.

Dock (maritime) – British English

A shipyard|dockyard (or shipyard) consists of one or more docks, usually with other structures.

Dock (maritime) – American English

However, in modern use, pier is generally used to refer to structures originally intended for industrial use, such as seafood processing or shipping, and more recently for cruise ships, and dock is used for most everything else, often with a qualifier, such as ferry dock, swimming dock, ore dock and others

Dock (maritime) – American English

In the cottage country of Canada and the United States, a dock is a wooden platform built over water, with one end secured to the shore. The platform is used for the boarding and offloading of small boats.

Shenzhou 10 – Launch and docking

Shenzhou 10 was launched on 11 June 2013, at 09:38 UTC (17:38 local time)

Shenzhou 10 – Launch and docking

The spacecraft docked with Tiangong 1 at 05:11 UTC on 13 June. The crew opened the hatch three hours later and entered the laboratory module.

André Kuipers – Launch and docking

Using the Soyuz spacecraft|Soyuz Soyuz TMA-4|TMA-4, mounted atop a Soyuz-FG rocket, Kuipers and his fellow cosmonauts Gennady Padalka (Russia) and Michael Fincke (USA) rocketed towards the ISS in the early morning of 19 April 2004. The spacecraft flawlessly docked to the ISS two days later.

Royal Docks

The three docks collectively formed the largest enclosed docks in the world, with a water area of nearly and an overall estate of

Royal Docks – History

The PLA completed the King George V Dock in 1921 and reserved land to the north for a fourth dock, never built.

Royal Docks – History

The General Strike of 1926 hit the Royal Docks hard, with 750,000 frozen carcasses threatened by the docks’ electrical supply being cut off. Fortunately for the dock owners, the Royal Navy were able to save the day by connecting the generators of two submarines to power the warehouses’ freezers.

Royal Docks – History

Although the Royal Docks suffered severe damage from Germany|German bombing in World War II, they recovered after the war but suffered a steady decline from the 1960s onwards, following the adoption of containerization. Nonetheless, they survived longer than any of the other upstream docks, finally closing to commercial traffic only in 1981. The docks’ closure led to high levels of unemployment and social deprivation in the surrounding communities of North Woolwich and Silvertown.

Royal Docks – Redevelopment

This was later extended round the south side of the docks with the link to London City Airport opening in December 2006

Royal Docks – Redevelopment

While the docks themselves have been preserved largely intact, little remains of the old infrastructure, although some historic warehouses and cranes have been preserved.

Royal Docks – Redevelopment

In 2011 the one hundred and twenty five hectares of the Royal Docks were granted Enterprise Zone status to help attract jobs and businesses to the area.[http://www.london.gov.uk/media/press_releases_mayoral/london’s-royal-docks-become-one-country’s-largest-enterprise-zones London’s Royal Docks to become one of country’s largest Enterprise Zones | Greater London Authority]

Royal Docks – Transport

The DLR replaced the North London Line services that previously served the area from Canning Town to North Woolwich via Custom House and the 600m Connaught tunnel beneath the docks.

Royal Docks – Transport

From 2018 a branch of the Crossrail line will pass beneath the Royal Docks between Canning Town and Woolwich, serving Custom House station (and future provision for a station at Silvertown railway station|Silvertown. Crossrail reuses the southern part of the former North London Line alignment from Custom House to North Woolwich (including the Connaught tunnel built in 1878).

Royal Docks – Transport

However in the run up to the 2012 election Mayor Johnson has started to push for a Silvertown Link|crossing at Silvertown (the western end of the docks)

Royal Docks – Transport

The Royal Docks is also home to London City Airport, between the northern and southern docks. It was opened in 1988 to serve the Canary Wharf development and is closer to central London than Heathrow. It is served by a dedicated DLR station and in 2010 London City was the fifth busiest airport in terms of passengers and aircraft movements serving the London area.

Royal Docks – Navigation

The docks’ principal use is now water sports, but they do see occasional visits by naval and merchant vessels, especially during the annual London Boat Show and the biannual DSEi arms fair, both of which are held at the ExCeL Exhibition Centre

Royal Docks – Navigation

The management of the water areas of the Royal Docks, including locks and bridges, is now the responsibility of Royal Docks Management Authority Limited (RoDMA), which is owned and funded by the owners of the surrounding development land.

Space dock

A ‘space dock’ is a (currently fictional) type of ‘dry dock’ for spacecraft|spaceships or starships, which would most likely be located in a low Earth orbit|low planetary orbit. However, concept work has been undertaken on real space dock facilities that could be built with current technology.

Space dock

In both real-world as well as fictional use, they provide dedicated facilities to repair or build spacecraft, bypassing the need to lift materials from a gravity well (or allowing these materials to be lifted in smaller, more manageable loads), respectively avoiding the need for an existing spacecraft to make a planetary landing for maintenance.

Space dock – Real world

A space dock / hangar could also allow enclosed (and possibly pressurized) maintenance of smaller spacecraft and space planes, though the construction of non-atmospheric spacecraft and other space facilities is envisaged as its main use.[http://www.aiaa.org/tc/sl/Reference_materials/Architecting_Rapid_Growth_in_Space_Logistics_Capabilities_updated.pdf Architecting Rapid Growth in Space Logistics Capabilities] – Snead, James Michael; American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, 2004) The structural strength of such a more advanced hangar would primarily be based on the internal atmospheric pressure that would have to be sustained for shirt-sleeve operations, thus enabling routine servicing and assembly in space.[http://www.airpower.maxwell.af.mil/airchronicles/cc/snead.html Near-Term Manned Space Logistics Operations] – Air Space Power Journal, 31 August 2005

Space dock – Real world

The use of a major space dock as a construction facility would also be required for the construction of an interstellar colonization starship built with current or near-term technology.[http://www-sgc.colorado.edu/symposium_archive/2001/papers/full_papers/interplanetary/Interstellar%20starship.doc Prospects for Interstellar Starship Design Based on Current Technologies] (Microsoft Word|.DOC) – Gourley, Jim; United States Air Force Academy, paper for 2001 CSGC Undergraduate Space Research Symposium of the Colorado Space Grant Consortium

Space dock – Real world

Future Ares V missions for example could serve to cost-effectively transport construction materials for future spacecraft and space exploration|space exploration missions,Please refer to Vision for Space Exploration#Outline. delivering raw materials to a Moon-based space dock positioned as a counterweightPlease refer to Space elevator#Counterweight. to a Moon-based space elevator.Please refer to Space elevator#Extraterrestrial elevators.

Space dock – Science fiction

Space docks serve the same purpose as their non-fictional terrestrial dry dock counterparts, being used for construction, repairs, refits and restorations of spacecraft

Space dock – Science fiction

Such science fiction settings as Star Wars, Babylon 5, the Honorverse[http://infodump.thefifthimperium.com/Harrington/hh_shipyard_types.htm Shipyard types] (forum post regarding the Honorverse space docks, alleged to be from David Weber himself) and the Foundation series series mention or allude substantially to such facilities.

Space dock – Star Trek

Space docks of varying styles and sizes have made a number of appearances in the Star Trek science fiction universe. Often they were shown as open, metal framed structures in which a vessel could be docked. The first such drydock was seen in Star Trek: The Motion Picture with the refit USS Enterprise (NCC-1701) contained within a dry dock before being sent to intercept an alien vessel on course for Earth.

Space dock – Star Trek

A larger facility, known as ‘SpaceDock’ was seen for the first time in Star Trek III: The Search for Spock. These were huge orbital command installations incorporating internal space docks that could be completely enclosed – starships could enter through bay doors to receive supplies or maintenance.

Space dock – Star Trek

A third type of space dock was seen occasionally in Star Trek: The Next Generation|The Next Generation and following series. This type of dock had a large command pod at the top, with arms underneath that could house a starship. The USS Enterprise (NCC-1701-D)|Enterprise-D was refitted and repaired in such a dock following The Best of Both Worlds (Star Trek: The Next Generation)|combat with the Borg in 2367.

Space dock – Babylon 5

Dock facilities were occasionally seen on the Babylon 5 television series and movies. In the Babylon 5 universe, the space docks were structures deployed outside the station when larger ships were in need of repair. The Babylon 5 (space station)|Babylon-station itself effectively served as a Space dock with internal docking facilities for freighters, personal transport vessels and its own complement of fighter-craft designated to protect the station.

Space dock – Babylon 5

During the events of the movie Babylon 5: A Call to Arms|A Call to Arms, the Excalibur and the Victory were shown in the dry dock facilities in which they were constructed. The dock was destroyed by the Drakh following their attack on Earth, which would halt the construction of further Victory class destroyers until the facilities could be rebuilt.

Edoardo Amaldi ATV – Docking

The ATV docked with the ISS on 28 March 2012, five days after its launch.[http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-2121670/ATV-craft-filmed-docking-International-Space-Station.html European cargo craft filmed making a flawless docking with the International Space Station shortly after being spotted from Earth making its approach]

Albert Einstein ATV – Docking

The ATV docked successfully with the ISS at 14:07 GMT (16:07 CEST) on 15 June 2013 and the hatch was opened on 18 June.[http://blogs.esa.int/atv/2013/06/18/first-days-after-the-arrival-of-atv-4/ First days after the arrival of ATV-4] ESA

Albert Einstein ATV – Reboost and docked operations

On 19 June 2013, Albert Einstein conducted its first reboost of the ISS, performing a 407-second burn which provided a delta-v change of 1.0m/s to the station.[http://blogs.esa.int/atv/2013/06/19/atv-conducts-first-reboost-for-the-international-space-station/ ATV conducts first reboost for the International Space Station]

Albert Einstein ATV – Reboost and docked operations

The pipelines were then purged to avoid any complications during Albert Einstein’s undocking from the ISS.

Dock (Mac OS X)

The ‘Dock (computing)|Dock’ is a prominent feature of the graphical user interface of the OS X Operating System. It is used to launch applications and switch between running applications. The Dock is also a prominent feature of OS X’s predecessor NeXTSTEP and OpenStep Operating Systems. The earliest known implementations of a dock are found in Operating Systems such as RISC OS and NextStep. iOS has its own version of the Dock for iPhone and iPad.

Dock (Mac OS X)

Part of the system core network|core services in OS X, Dock.app is located at /System/Library/CoreServices/.

Dock (Mac OS X) – Overview

In NeXTSTEP and OpenStep, the Dock is an application launcher that holds icon (computing)|icons for frequently used Computer program|programs. The icon for the Workspace Manager and the Recycler are always visible. The Dock indicates if a program is not running by showing an ellipsis below its icon. If the program is running, there isn’t an ellipsis on the icon. In OS X, running applications are identified by a blue luminous dot.

Dock (Mac OS X) – Overview

These features are unlike those of the dock in the NeXT Operating Systems where the capacity of the Dock is dependent on display resolution

Dock (Mac OS X) – Overview

The changes to the dock bring its functionality also close to that of Apple Inc.|Apple’s Newton OS Button Bar, as found in the MessagePad 2×00 series and the likes. Applications could be dragged in and out of the Extras Drawer, a Finder (software)|Finder-like app, onto the bar. Also, when the screen was put into landscape mode, the user could choose to position the Button Bar at the right or left side of the screen, just like the Dock in OS X.

Dock (Mac OS X) – Overview

Docklings (in OS X 10.4 or earlier) can also be opened by using the right-mouse button, if the mouse has one, but most of the time either clicking and holding or control-click will bring the menu up.

Dock (Mac OS X) – Overview

Stacks could be shown in three ways: a fan, a grid, or a list, which is similar to docklings. In grid view, the folders in that stack can be opened directly in that stack without the need to open Finder.

Dock (Mac OS X) – Overview

The latest iteration of the dock, found in OS X Leopard, Snow Leopard, Lion, Mountain Lion, and Mavericks, presents a 3D perspective instead of the traditional flat one, resembling Sun Microsystems’ Project Looking Glass application dock.[ www.engadget.com/2007/06/12/leopard-dock-resembles-suns-project-looking-glass/ Leopard dock resembles Sun’s Project Looking Glass? – Engadget]

Dock (Mac OS X) – Related software

Earlier versions of Mac OS (before 10.0) did not have a dock, but add-ons such as DragThing added a dock for users of earlier versions.

Dock (Mac OS X) – Related software

Microsoft implemented a simplified dock feature in Windows 98 with the QuickLaunch toolbar and this feature remained until Windows Vista. In Windows 7 the new Features new to Windows 7|Superbar seems to have been heavily influenced by the OS X Dock.

Dock (Mac OS X) – Related software

Some examples are Window Maker (which emulates the look and feel of the NeXTstep GUI), Docky, and Avant Window Navigator, KXDocker (amongst others) for KDE and various other GDesklets|gdesklet/adesklets docks, AfterStep’s Wharf (a derivation from the NeXTstep UI), iTask NG (a module used with some Enlightenment (window manager)|Enlightenment-based Linux distributions such as gOS (Operating System)|gOS) and Blackbox’s Slit.

Dock (Mac OS X) – Criticism

Tognazzini also criticized the Dock’s ability to add and remove aliases, saying confusion could result when an icon is dragged out of the dock and needs to be re-added from Finder

Dock (Mac OS X) – Criticism

Siracusa further criticised the dock after the release of OS X v10.5, noting that some of the dock’s ease-of-use was sacrificed for eye-candy, such as a reflective and 3D dock, a blue-light active program indicator, and the presence of less-distinguishable system icons.

Dock (Mac OS X) – Criticism

An article on OSNews written by its managing editor, Thom Holwerda, stated some concerns with the dock, including the fact that the dock grows in both directions, has the Trash icon mounted on the dock, and that there are no permanent labels. Holwerda also criticized the revised look of the dock found in OS X v10.5, but admitted that it may have simply been an adjustment on their part.

Dock (OS X)

Part of the system core network|core services in OS X, Dock.app is located at /System/Library/CoreServices/.

Yahoo! Widget Engine – (The) Dock

For users who prefer not to have a dock visible all the time, the dock has options to auto-hide when not active, or even close entirely.

Royal Engineers – H.M. Dockyards

In 1873, Captain Henry Brandreth RE was appointed Director of the Department of Architecture and Civil Engineering, later the Admiralty Works Department. Following this appointment many Royal Engineer officers superintended engineering works at Naval Dockyards in various parts of the world.

Royal Engineers – H.M. Dockyards

Early in the 19th century, cast, wrought and corrugated iron came to be used in dockyard buildings, replacing wood as the material for frames and cladding. The experience of the Corps made them experts in the use of these new materials.

Royal Engineers – Chatham Dockyard

In 1886 Major Henry Pilkington RE was appointed Superintendent of Engineering at the Chatham Dockyard|Dockyard, moving on to Director of Engineering at the Admiralty in 1890 and Engineer-in-Chief of Naval Loan Works, where he was responsible for the extension of all major Dockyards at home and abroad

Everett massacre – Confrontation at the Dock

Local business interests, knowing the Wobblies were coming, placed armed vigilantes on the dock and on at least one tugboat in the harbor, Edison, owned by the American Tug Boat Company.McCurdy, at 263 As with previous labor demonstrations, the local business had also secured the aid of law enforcement, including the Snohomish County, Washington|Snohomish County sheriff Donald McRae, who had targeted Wobblies for arbitrary arrests and beatings.Clark, Norman H., Mill Town — A social history of Everett, Washington, at 186-87, University of Washington Press, Seattle, WA 1970 ISBN 0-295-95241-5

Liverpool Dockers’ Strike

Although referred to as a strike it was strictly a dispute because the employers, the ‘MDHC’ (Mersey Docks and Harbour Company) had actually used the opportunity to sack the dockers who were caught up in a separate dispute.

Liverpool Dockers’ Strike

A t-shirt was designed to show support for the dockers incorporating the Calvin Klein ‘CK’ into the word docker.[http://garstontowers.blogspot.com/2010/07/blast-from-past-for-lefty-socialist.html Image of CK t-shirt] The t-shirt was worn by many celebrities but most famously by Robbie Fowler during a goal celebration while playing for Liverpool FC.

Liverpool Dockers’ Strike

The dispute went on to be one of the longest in British industrial relations history. It was in February 1998 that the dockers finally accepted a settlement.

Liverpool Dockers’ Strike

British director Ken Loach made a documentary about the strike, The Flickering Flame, in 1996. A group of sacked dockers themselves wrote the script for a film about their experiences, Dockers, with the help of well-known Liverpool writer Jimmy McGovern and the author Irvine Welsh. The film was shown on Channel 4 in 1999.

Liverpool Dockers’ Strike

After the dispute some of the dockers bought the Casa Bar on Hope St. in Liverpool town centre.[http://www.liverpooldailypost.co.uk/food/bar-reviews/2008/01/14/casa-hope-street-liverpool-64375-20350139/ Liverpool Daily Post bar review]

Liverpool Dockers’ Strike – Resources

* [http://www.radicalanthropologygroup.org/pub_another_world.pdf Another World is Possible: How the Liverpool Dockers Launched a Global Movement], Pauline Bradley and Chris Knight. Published by the Radical Anthropology Group, 2004. Pamphlet by two members of the London Support Group.

George Washington – Braddock disaster 1755

The French and their Indian allies ambushed Braddock, who was mortally wounded in the Battle of the Monongahela

Cod (food) – Haddock as food

Haddock is a very popular food fish, sold fresh, Smoking (cooking)|smoked, frozen, dried, or to a small extent canned. Haddock, along with cod and plaice, is one of the most popular fish used in British fish and chips.

Cod (food) – Haddock as food

Haddock is the predominant fish of choice in Scotland in a fish and chips|fish supper

Cod (food) – Haddock as food

Unlike the related cod, haddock does not salting (food)|salt well and is often preserved by drying (food)|drying and smoking (cooking)|smoking.

Cod (food) – Haddock as food

These fishing grounds are sustainably managed[http://www.ices.dk/committe/acom/comwork/report/2010/Special%20Requests/Icelandic%20cod%20management%20plan.pdf Icelandic Request on the Evaluation of Icelandic Cod and Haddock Management Plan] and have not seen the large scale depreciation in fish stocks seen in EU waters.[http://eur-lex.europa.eu/Result.do?T1=V5T2=2008T3=331RechType=RECH_naturelSubmit=Search European Commission, Communication on Fishing Opportunities for 2009

Cod (food) – Haddock as food

One popular form of haddock is Finnan Haddie, named for the fishing village of Findon, Aberdeenshire|Finnan or Findon in Scotland, where it was originally cold-smoked over peat. Finnan haddie is often served poaching (cooking)|poached in milk for breakfast.[http://www.scotlandontv.tv/scotland_on_tv/video.html?vxSiteId=60fdd544-9c52-4e17-be7e-57a2a2d76992vxChannel=Food%20RecipesvxClipId=1380_SMG1149vxBitrate=300 Full recipe for Finnan Haddie from Scottish chef John Quigley]

Cod (food) – Haddock as food

Smoked haddock naturally has an off-white color; it is very often dyed yellow, as are other smoked fish. Smoked haddock is the essential ingredient in the Anglo-Indian dish kedgeree.

Cod (food) – Haddock as food

In 2010, Greenpeace International has added the haddock to its seafood red list. The Greenpeace International seafood red list is a list of fish that are commonly sold in supermarkets around the world, and which have a very high risk of being sourced from unsustainable fisheries.[http://www.greenpeace.org/international/seafood/red-list-of-species Greenpeace International Seafood Red list]

Portsmouth Block Mills – Development of Portsmouth Dockyard

The Royal Navy had evolved with United Kingdom|Britain’s development by the middle of the eighteenth century into what has been described as the greatest industrial power in the western world. The Admiralty and Navy Board began a programme of modernisation of dockyards at Portsmouth Dockyard|Portsmouth and Plymouth such that by the start of the war with Revolutionary France they possessed the most up-to-date fleet facilities in Europe.

Portsmouth Block Mills – Development of Portsmouth Dockyard

The dock system at Portsmouth has its origins in the work of Edmund Dummer (naval engineer)|Edmund Dummer in the 1690s. He constructed a series of Dock (maritime)|basins and wet and dry docks. Alterations were made to these in the course of the eighteenth century. One of the basins had become redundant by 1770 and it was proposed to use this as a sump into which all the water from the other facilities could drain. The water was pumped out by a series of horse-operated chain pumps.

Portsmouth Block Mills – Development of Portsmouth Dockyard

They also introduced similar modernisation at the other Naval dockyards in conjunction with M I Brunel and Maudslay

Portsmouth Block Mills – Development of Portsmouth Dockyard

He installed a steam engine designed by a member of his staff, James Sadler (balloonist)|James Sadler, in 1798 which, as well as working the chain pumps, drove woodworking machinery and a pump to take water from a well round the dockyard for fire-fighting purposes

Portsmouth Block Mills – Development of Portsmouth Dockyard

In 1800 a Boulton and Watt beam engine was ordered as back-up and was housed in a three-storey engine house in line with the Sadler engine house. This engine was replaced in 1837 by another engine made by James Watt|James Watt and Co.

Portsmouth Block Mills – Development of Portsmouth Dockyard

Space was very tight and expansion of manufacturing facilities was not possible, so by 1802 the drainage basin was filled with two tiers of brick vaults—the lower layer to act as the reservoir, the upper layer as storage, and the roof of the latter being level with the surrounding land, so creating more space

Portsmouth Block Mills – Development of Portsmouth Dockyard

While the vaults were under construction Bentham was ordering woodworking machinery of his own design, mostly up-and-down saws and circular saws. These were fitted-up in both ranges, the power to drive them being transmitted from the engines to the north range by underdrives through the upper layer of vaults, and then by vertical shafts to the upper floors of the buildings. The final drives to the machines was by flat belts running on pulleys.

Portsmouth Block Mills – Development of Portsmouth Dockyard

This machinery was planned to cut timber for the numerous smaller parts used in shipbuilding, especially joinery, which had previously been cut by hand, such as components for tables and benches, as well as small turned goods like belaying pins

Michelle Dockery

‘Michelle Suzanne Dockery’Births, Marriages Deaths Index of England Wales, 1916–2005.; at ancestry.com (born 15 December 1981) is an English actress and singer

Michelle Dockery – Early life

Her father, Michael Francis Dockery, was born at Athlone, Ireland, and worked his way up from driving a van to becoming a surveyor;[http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-2043939/Downton-Abbeys-girls-On-screen-play-Earls-daughters-secret-hide-dramas-lie-family-histories.html Real secrets of Downton’s girls] October 2011, Daily Mail her mother, Lorraine (née Witton) is from Stepney, East London.

Michelle Dockery – Early life

Dockery’s maternal great-grandmother, Maud Malyon, was born in 1910 in Newham, East London, and was a domestic servant. Malyon was 17 when she married Dockery’s great-grandfather, grocer’s assistant William Henry Oakman, 18, at West Ham Register Office.

Michelle Dockery – Early life

Dockery was educated first at the Chadwell Heath Foundation School (now the Chadwell Heath Academy) in Chadwell Heath, Essex. She was then trained at the Finch Stage School. After her A Levels she enrolled at the Guildhall School of Music Drama, graduating in 2004.

Michelle Dockery – Theatre

Dockery was a member of the National Youth Theatre, studied at the Guildhall School of Music and Drama where she won the Gold Medal for drama and made her professional debut in His Dark Materials (play)|His Dark Materials at the Royal National Theatre in 2004. In 2006, she was nominated for the Ian Charleson Award for her performance as Dina Dorf in Pillars of Society|Pillars of the Community at the National Theatre.

Michelle Dockery – Theatre

Dockery appeared in Burnt by the Sun at the National Theatre for which she received an Olivier Award nomination for Best Supporting Actress

Michelle Dockery – Theatre

In 2010, she played Ophelia in Hamlet at the Crucible Theatre alongside John Simm.[http://www.independent.co.uk/arts-entertainment/theatre-dance/reviews/first-night-hamlet-sheffield-crucible-2087076.html First Night: Hamlet, Sheffield Crucible] The Independent, 23 September 2010

Michelle Dockery – Television

Dockery made her television debut as Betty in Fingersmith (TV serial)|Fingersmith in 2005.

Michelle Dockery – Television

In 2006, she starred as Susan Sto Helit in a two-part adaptation of Terry Pratchett’s novel Hogfather.

Michelle Dockery – Television

In 2008, Dockery played Kathryn in Channel 4’s The Red Riding Trilogy and played the guest lead of tormented rape victim Gemma Morrison in BBC’s Waking the Dead (TV series)|Waking the Dead. In 2009, she appeared in the two-part Cranford (tv series)|Cranford Christmas special for the BBC, and starred as the lead character in a modernised BBC adaptation of The Turn of the Screw (TV 2009)|The Turn of the Screw.

Michelle Dockery – Television

A second series of Downton Abbey was shown in 2011, followed by a special Christmas Day episode, with Dockery nominated for an Emmy Award in the category of Best Actress

Michelle Dockery – Music

Dockery is a jazz singer. She sang at the 50th Anniversary of Ronnie Scott’s|Ronnie Scott’s Jazz club in London and has occasionally sung with Sadie and the Hotheads, a band formed by Elizabeth McGovern, who plays her mother in Downton Abbey.The Times, 6 November 2010 Dockery cites her musical influences as Peggy Lee, Melody Gardot and Billie Holiday in her more melancholy moods.

Manchester Ship Canal – Docks and wharfs

5, known as Ordsall Dock, was part of Pomona Docks, but was dug on the Salford side of the river; it was never completed and was filled in around 1905.

Manchester Ship Canal – Docks and wharfs

The western four docks have been converted into the Salford Quays development; ships using the Manchester Ship Canal now dock at various places along the canal side such as Mode Wheel (Salford), Trafford Park, and Ellesmere Port

Manchester Ship Canal – Docks and wharfs

Each of the three graving docks could accommodate ocean-going ships of up to in length and in beam, equivalent to vessels of 8,000gross tons

Atlantic Gateway (North West England) – Manchester Docks: Port Salford

The Port Salford plan will create a freight terminal near Trafford Park

Atlantic Gateway (North West England) – Manchester Docks: Port Salford

Peel plan to begin construction in summer 2011, having issued tender details in early 2011 with the site operational by 2014. The port will be modelled on Duisburg|Duisburg Port, the largest inland port in the world.

Atlantic Gateway (North West England) – Manchester Docks: Port Salford

Upon completion Port Salford will be the only inland distribution park in the UK accessible by a canal or river; it is estimated that Port Salford will require 18 freight trains a day to shift goods stored at the distribution terminal.

New Orleans Dock Workers and Unionization

Dockworkers (also known as waterfront workers) in the United States city of New Orleans at the turn of the 20th century often coordinated their unionization efforts across racial lines

New Orleans Dock Workers and Unionization

As discussed below, several factors may have allowed bi-racial union efforts to succeed at the port of New Orleans, including (a) the independent strength of the blackFor the sake of consistency throughout, this Article uses the racial descriptors black and white

New Orleans Dock Workers and Unionization

Because dock work was generally unskilled (with the notable exception of New Orleans Dock Workers and Unionization#Screwmen|screwmen) and of a short-term contractual nature, an employer could readily replace workers who refused to bend to the employer’s terms

New Orleans Dock Workers and Unionization – 50-50 or Half-and-Half

This was generally seen as a way to prevent employers from undermining one group by playing to the other: both black and white union leaders recognizes that when blacks and whites were hired in alternating groups as they were in the mid-1890s, unions weakened and race riots or other tensions could – and did – flare up.Rosenberg, Daniel, New Orleans Dockworkers: Race, Labor, and Unionism 1892-1923 SUNY Press, Albany (1988) (pp

New Orleans Dock Workers and Unionization – 50-50 or Half-and-Half

As the overarching union body, the Council was also empowered to call for a general port strike.New Orleans Dockworkers: Race, Labor, and Unionism 1892-1923 (p

New Orleans Dock Workers and Unionization – Limits On Racial Cooperation

The structure and operation of the Dock and Cotton Council has also been seen as racially stratified by some scholars

New Orleans Dock Workers and Unionization – Screwmen

Another account put the limit at 100 black screwmen at any one time.New Orleans Dockworkers: Race, Labor, and Unionism 1892-1923 (p

New Orleans Dock Workers and Unionization – Screwmen

There was also concern that the faster pace would mean that there would be less work left for subsequent days, leaving workers idle (and unpaid).New Orleans Dockworkers: Race, Labor, and Unionism 1892-1923 (p

New Orleans Dock Workers and Unionization – Screwmen

The definition of a fair day’s work was central to the dispute, and in April 1902 the employers’ Steamship Conference declared that (1) the employer had the right to direct where employees work; (2) that the employer’s orders must be obeyed, even if the employer’s agent was not a union member; (3) only Conference members could determine the “character of the stowage of the cotton”; and (4) the employer had the right to expect as much work as could reasonably be done.Waterfront Workers of New Orleans (p

New Orleans Dock Workers and Unionization – Screwmen

As scholar [http://departments.columbian.gwu.edu/history/people/92 Eric Arnesen] analyzed the situation, “white workers reasoned accurately that success lay in reducing all possible divisions between black and white workers and preventing a revival of a split labor market on the docks.”“Biracial Waterfront Unionism” in Waterfront Workers (p

New Orleans Dock Workers and Unionization – Screwmen

Moreover, 100 to 120 bales of cotton would be a day’s work – not the 400 to 700 demanded under shoot-the-chute.New Orleans Dockworkers: Race, Labor, and Unionism 1892-1923 (p

New Orleans Dock Workers and Unionization – Screwmen

Despite the fact that employers accused black unions of breaking the terms in their earlier separate contract and threatened them, the strike remained united and ended in early December 1902; by December 25, screwmen were packing on average 110 bales per day.New Orleans Dockworkers: Race, Labor, and Unionism 1892-1923 (p

New Orleans Dock Workers and Unionization – Screwmen

Although rumors of a split between the black and white unions surfaced, no break actually occurred.New Orleans Dockworkers: Race, Labor, and Unionism 1892-1923 (p

New Orleans Dock Workers and Unionization – Screwmen

Shippers experienced more than $400,000 in losses while screwmen lost $50,000 in wages and prevented any bales of cotton from leaving the port of New Orleans between October 1 and October 10, 1903.New Orleans Dockworkers: Race, Labor, and Unionism 1892-1923 (p

New Orleans Dock Workers and Unionization – The 1907 General Levee Strike

Individual black and white waterfront unions reinforced the Council’s message, asking their members to stay away from the ports, insisting that they would hold firm across racial lines, and noting that if the employers played one racial group against the other, they would all face starvation wages.New Orleans Dockworkers: Race, Labor, and Unionism 1892-1923 (p

New Orleans Dock Workers and Unionization – The 1907 General Levee Strike

Yet the New Orleans strikers remained generally peaceful.New Orleans Dockworkers: Race, Labor, and Unionism 1892-1923 (p

New Orleans Dock Workers and Unionization – The 1907 General Levee Strike

Despite the attempts, strikers remained united.New Orleans Dockworkers: Race, Labor, and Unionism 1892-1923 (pp

New Orleans Dock Workers and Unionization – The 1907 General Levee Strike

This was rejected by management, and prompted claims in the newspapers that the workers were inflexible.New Orleans Dockworkers: Race, Labor, and Unionism 1892-1923 (pp

New Orleans Dock Workers and Unionization – The 1907 General Levee Strike

200); New Orleans Dockworkers: Race, Labor, and Unionism 1892-1923 (p

Dock connector

A ‘dock connector’ is a connector used to attach a mobile electronic device simultaneously to multiple external resources. The dock connector will typically carry a variety of signals and power, through a single connector, to simplify the process of docking (disambiguation)|docking the mobile device. A dock connector may be embedded in a mechanical fixture used to support or align the mobile device or may be at the end of a cable.

Dock connector

The dock connector was originally associated with laptops, but other mobile devices use the concept.

Dock connector – Laptops

Docking connectors for laptop computers are usually embedded into a mechanical device that supports and aligns the laptop and sports various single function ports and a power source that are aggregated into the docking connector. Docking connectors would carry interfaces such as keyboard (computing)|keyboard, serial port|serial, parallel port|parallel, and video port|video ports from the laptop and supply power to it.

Dock connector – Mobile devices

Many mobile devices feature a dock connector.

Dock connector – Mobile devices

Dock connector can be used to interface with accessories such as external speakers, including stereo systems and clock radios. Automotive accessories for the mobile devices include charging cradles, FM transmitters for playing audio through the car’s speakers and a GPS receiver. There are dock connector cables that offer additional capability such as direct integration with the car’s audio system and controls.

Dock connector – Apple 30-pin dock connector

FireWire was phased out of the iPods, which led to a discontinuity in usage of the dock connector.

Dock connector – Apple 30-pin dock connector

As a result of the popularity of Apple’s iPod and iPhone devices using the connector, a cottage industry was created of third-party devices that could connect to the interface.www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2245786,00.asp With the discontinuation of the 160GB iPod Classic 6, the last Apple product to sport the original 30-pin iPod connector, the connector was thus also discontinued in September 2014.

Dock connector – Apple Lightning connector

Apple Lightning connector pins can be accessed from both sides of the connector allowing insertion with either side facing up.[https://www.apple.com/iphone/features Apple iPhone 5 features; Apple.com] The Lightning connector replaced the 30-pin dock connector used by previous generations of iPods, iPhones, and iPads

Dock connector – Samsung 30-pin dock connector

The Samsung Samsung Galaxy Tab series|Galaxy Tab and Samsung Galaxy Note series|Galaxy Note 30-pin dock/charging connector is very similar to – although not identical with – the non-proprietary PDMI|PDMI connector. It is unrelated to the Apple 30-pin connector.

Dock connector – Korean standard cellular phone 24-pin and 20-pin dock connectors

the 2001 Korean Telecommunications Technology Association (TTA) Standard on I/O Connection Interface of Digital Cellular Phone defined a 24-pin electromechanical interface specifications for cellular phone charging, wired data communication, analog audio, etc.Standard on I/O Connection Interface of Digital Cellular Phone TTAS.KO-06.0028 released in March 2001

Dock connector – Portable Digital Media Interface (PDMI)

The ‘Portable Digital Media Interface’ (PDMI) is a 30-pin interconnection standard for portable media players. It was developed by the Consumer Electronics Association as ANSI/CEA-2017-A, Common Interconnection for Portable Media Players in February 2010. The standard was developed with the input or support of over fifty consumer electronics companies worldwide.[http://www.ce.org/Standards/browseByCommittee_6322.asp CEA-2017, Common Inerconnection for Portable Media Players]

Dock connector – Other dock connectors

* Cowon iAudio 22-pin dock connector

Dock connector – Other dock connectors

* Tatung Company|Tatung Elio 26-pin dock connector

Dock connector – Other dock connectors

* Sony NW-A1000/3000 42-pin multi-connector

Krita – Dockers

Krita has the following dockers availables: preset selector, layer management, channel management, various color selectors, tool options, shape selector, composition docker, undo history, pattern selector, task sets, scripts and various dockers for working with vector objects. Krita’s dockers can be freely relocated around its window, users can:

Krita – Dockers

* Group multiple dockers to share the same vertical space

Krita – Dockers

* Switched between grouped dockers by tabs

STS-135 – 10 July (Flight Day 3 – Docking)

The STS-135 crew began their day at 07:29 UTC and prepared to dock with the ISS. The crew encountered a minor problem when Atlantis’s General Purpose Computer (GPC3) failed. However, this held no impacts for the rendezvous and docking operations as two GPCs proved sufficient.

STS-135 – 10 July (Flight Day 3 – Docking)

Commander Chris Ferguson and pilot Douglas Hurley performed a series of rendezvous burns (NH, NC4, NCC, MC1-4 and TI) to boost the orbit of Atlantis to match with that of the ISS

STS-135 – 10 July (Flight Day 3 – Docking)

Houston, station, Atlantis, capture confirmed and we see free drift, radioed Hurley, confirming the successful docking

STS-135 – 10 July (Flight Day 3 – Docking)

The crew then got to work with Ferguson and Hurley using the shuttle arm to take its OBSS from the station’s Canadarm2 operated by Garan and Furukawa. The station arm had plucked the OBSS from its stowage position on the shuttle cargo bay sill. The handoff was to prepare to use the boom for any shuttle heat shield late inspections if required. Magnus worked with TV setup and Walheim transferred spacewalk gear.

STS-135 – 10 July (Flight Day 3 – Docking)

During Flight Day 3, flight controllers began monitoring reports from the Department of Defense’s U.S. Strategic Command that an orbital debris piece of the Russian satellite COSMOS 375 may come near the station and shuttle complex about noon the next day. The team updated tracking information following the docking and determined that no course correction maneuver was necessary.

STS-135 – 19 July (Flight Day 12 – Undocking)

With pilot Douglas Hurley at the control, undocking occurred at 6:28 UTC as the two spacecraft flew through orbital night above the Pacific Ocean east of Christchurch, New Zealand

STS-135 – 19 July (Flight Day 12 – Undocking)

After undocking, Atlantis moved away, to a station keeping point about ahead of the ISS

STS-135 – 19 July (Flight Day 12 – Undocking)

Teams in both shuttle and station flight control rooms in Houston were working their last shuttle shift

STS-135 – 19 July (Flight Day 12 – Undocking)

At the end of the half-loop, Atlantis did two TI separation burns, the second at 8:18 UTC to move away from the vicinity of the space station.

STS-135 – 19 July (Flight Day 12 – Undocking)

Magnus and ground engineers began reviewing the collected data to verify that shuttle’s TPS has received no impact damage from micrometeoroids or space junk during its docked operations or fly-around of the station

George Peter Murdock

‘George Peter (Pete) Murdock’ (May 11, 1897 – March 29, 1985), also known as ‘G. P. Murdock’, was an American anthropologist. He is remembered for his empirical approach to ethnological studies and his landmark works on Old World populations.

George Peter Murdock – Early life

Keller, prompted Murdock to study Anthropology at Yale

George Peter Murdock – Early life

Even in his earliest writings, Murdock’s distinctive approach is apparent

George Peter Murdock – Early life

While his pre-war fieldwork had been among the Haida people|Haida and other indigenous peoples of the Northwest North American coast, Murdock’s interests were now focused on Micronesia, and he conducted fieldwork there episodically until the 1960s.Whiting 1986: 684

George Peter Murdock – Yale

Leaving his long-time residence at 960 Ridge Road in Hamden, Connecticut, Murdock moved with his wife to 4150 Bigelow Boulevard in Pittsburgh

George Peter Murdock – Yale

Murdock and his wife had one child, Robert Douglas Murdock. He was born in 1929 and died in 2011.Obituary, Philadelphia Inquirer, July 28, 2011.

George Peter Murdock – Yale

For Murdock’s war service in World War II, the best source is his own account as published in A Twenty-Five Year Record: Yale College Class of 1919, a class yearbook published in New Haven, Connecticut in 1946. These are Murdock’s own recollections, as shared with his classmates in the class of 1919 at Yale:

George Peter Murdock – Yale

Before war struck, I was preoccupied with the routines of academic life at Yale—teaching and research with their modest rewards, departmental administration with its headaches, pleasant extra-curricular associations with my colleagues

George Peter Murdock – Yale

“For two months, helped by one language officer, my job was to induce or drag the terror-stricken nstives out of their mountain fastnesses into the coastal villages where we could house and feed them, give them medical attention and get them back to a normal peace-time economy

George Peter Murdock – Yale

[. . .] By early October the pull for home was very strong, and I left Okinawa on a task force bound for Norfolk. We stopped enroute for three or four days each at Singapore, Colombo, and Cape Town, where we were welcomed by the residents and wined and dined by the Royal Navy. Having completed a circuit of the world, I rejoined my family on December 7.

George Peter Murdock – Yale

Murdock was not the only person in his field or at his university to cooperate with intelligence agencies

George Peter Murdock – Yale

In 1948, Murdock decided that his cross-cultural data set would be more valuable were it available to researchers at schools other than Yale. He approached the Social Science Research Council and obtained the funding to establish an inter-university organization, the Human Relations Area Files, with collections maintained at Yale University (Whiting 1986: 684).

George Peter Murdock – Major works

In 1959, despite having no professional experience in Africa, Murdock published Africa: Its peoples and their culture history, which both constitutes a very useful reference book on African ethnic groups and also broke new ground in the analysis of prehistory, especially the domestication of plants.

George Peter Murdock – University of Pittsburgh

In 1960, Murdock moved to the University of Pittsburgh, where he occupied the Andrew Mellon Chair of Anthropology

George Peter Murdock – Ethnology

In 1962, Murdock founded [http://www.pitt.edu/~ethnolog Ethnology An International Journal of Cultural and Social Anthropology], published by the University of Pittsburgh. This publication continues in its 45th volume as one of the pre-eminent anthropology journals in the world.

George Peter Murdock – Contributions

Murdock is known most of all for his main sequence theory whose gist was spelled out by him initially as follows: When any social system which has attained equilibrium begins to change, such change regularly begins with modification of the rule of residence. Alteration in residence rules is followed by development or change in form of descent consistent with residence rules. Finally adaptive changes in kinship terminology follow (Murdock 1949:221-222).

Yorkshire Terrier – Docking

The majority of the rest of the world has adopted a ‘no docking/no cropping’ rule

Norwich Terrier – Tail docking

Only the American Kennel Club calls for a medium docked (long enough for a man’s hand to grasp) tail, though a natural tail is not a disqualification. In Australia and Canada tail docking is optional, but in NSW, it is illegal. In the United Kingdom, tail docking is only permitted for working dogs and is banned for dogs bred as pets or showing.

Norwich Terrier – Tail docking

Other countries that have banned tail docking include: Norway in 1987, and Sweden in 1988. In the last four years Cyprus, Greece, Luxembourg and Switzerland have also decided to introduce a ban on tail docking.

Norwich Terrier – Tail docking

Arguments for and against tail docking are covered in this Michigan State University (Detroit College of Law) paper, including History:

Nintendo DS accessories – Max Media Dock

Datel manufactures the Max Media Dock, this allows you to access, store and run media content from CompactFlash cards. It can accept cards up to 8 GB in size. This tool also lets people use Nintendo DS homebrew|DS homebrew. Nintendo DS homebrew|DS homebrew is software written for the Nintendo DS handheld games console by hobbyist programmers.

Skylab 4 – Docking

*’Time Docked’: 83 days, 4 hours, 38 minutes, 12 seconds

Melbourne Docklands

‘Docklands’ (also known as ‘Melbourne Docklands’ to differentiate it from London Docklands) is a suburb of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia, 2km (1.2mi) west of Melbourne’s Melbourne City Centre|Central Business District. Its Local government areas of Victoria|local government area is the City of Melbourne. At the 2011 Australian Census|2011 Census, Docklands had a population of 5,791.

Melbourne Docklands

Docklands occupies an area adjacent to the Melbourne CBD. It is bounded by Spencer Street, Melbourne|Spencer Street, Wurundjeri Way and the Charles Grimes Bridge to the east, CityLink to the west and Lorimer Street across the Yarra River|Yarra to the south and is a primarily waterfront area centred on the banks of the Yarra River.

Melbourne Docklands

Contemporary Docklands is the product of an ongoing urban renewal project to extend the area of the Melbourne CBD (excluding Southbank, Victoria|Southbank and St Kilda Road, Melbourne|St Kilda Road) by over a third when completed around 2015. It is now home to several of Melbourne’s modern landmarks, including Docklands Stadium|Etihad Stadium, Southern Cross Station and the Melbourne Star Ferris wheel.

Melbourne Docklands

From the 1880s, the former swamp west of Melbourne became heavily used as a Dock (maritime)|dock, with an extensive network of wharfs, heavy rail infrastructure and light industry. However, following the containerisation of shipping traffic it fell into disuse and by the 1990s was virtually abandoned, becoming notable for an underground rave dance scene, a dance culture which survives through popular organised events held at Docklands Stadium.

Melbourne Docklands

VicUrban promotes its vision of Docklands as being a major tourist attraction and projected over 20 million visitors a year and a future (2015) residential population of over 20,000.

Melbourne Docklands

A handful of significant buildings were retained, generally due to their association with the area’s industrial and maritime history. Most of these heritage buildings are intended for adaptive reuse and integrated with new facilities.

Melbourne Docklands

The business park model of medium-rise office buildings combined with transport and proximity to the City Centre is seen by many in the real estate industry to be one of the reasons behind the success of the Docklands office market.

Melbourne Docklands

Docklands is also the home to a number of water sports, including Dragon Boat racing.

Melbourne Docklands

While still incomplete, Docklands developer-centric planning has been widely criticised and many Melbourne politicians and media commentators lament its lack of green open space, pedestrian activity, transport links and culture.

Melbourne Docklands – History

Before the foundation of Melbourne, Docklands was a wetlands area consisting of a large salt lake and a giant swamp (known as West Melbourne Swamp) at the mouth of the Moonee Ponds Creek. It was one of the open hunting grounds of the Wurundjeri people, who created middens around the edges of the lake.

Melbourne Docklands – History

At Melbourne’s foundation, John Batman set up his home on Batman’s Hill at Docklands, marking the westernmost point of the settlement. However, the rest of the area remained largely unused for decades.

Melbourne Docklands – History

The advent of rail infrastructure in the late 1860s saw the City’s industry gradually expand into the area.

Melbourne Docklands – History

The earliest extensive plans to develop the area was in the 1870s, when a plan was prepared to extend the Hoddle Grid westward, following the curve of the Yarra River and effectively doubling its size. The plan proposed several gridlike blocks with an ornamental public garden and lake in the shape of the United Kingdom, occupying the site of the salt lake. However, expansion of the grid westward was abandoned in favour of a northward extension.

Melbourne Docklands – 1880s: Construction of a new Victoria Dock

A major engineering project began in the 1880s to reroute the course of the Yarra River, which resulted in the widening of the river for shipping and the creation of a new Victoria Dock (the name was previously used by one of the docks at Queensbridge as early as the 1850s). The dock was lined with wharves and light industry grew around the nearby western rail yards of Spencer Street railway station (now Southern Cross railway station), which were used for freighting the goods inland.

Melbourne Docklands – Interwar shipping era

During the wars, Victoria Dock was used as the main port for naval vessels and most of the Victorian troops returned from both wars to the docks.

Melbourne Docklands – Interwar shipping era

By the 1920s, with shipping moved from the Yarra turning basin at Queensbridge, Victoria Dock and surrounding port had become Melbourne’s busiest.

Melbourne Docklands – Disuse

With the introduction of containerisation of Victoria’s shipping industry in the 1950s and 60s, the dock (maritime)|docks along the Yarra River, east of the modern Bolte Bridge, and within Victoria Harbour immediately to the west of the Central Business District, became inadequate for the new container ships.

Melbourne Docklands – Disuse

The creation of Appleton Dock and Swanson Dock in an area west of the Moonee Ponds Creek, now known as West Melbourne, Victoria|West Melbourne, closer to the mouth of the Yarra, became the focus of container shipping, effectively rendering redundant a vast amount of vacant inner-city land to the immediate west of Melbourne’s CBD.

Melbourne Docklands – Early renewal proposals

Docklands was seen as a large urban blight by the John Cain II|Cain State Government. Property consultants JLW Advisory carried out the first market demand assessment of the site.[http://www.architecturemedia.com/aa/aaissue.php?issueid=199809article=11typeon=3 AA – Melbourne Docklands – September/October 1998]

Melbourne Docklands – Early renewal proposals

Nevertheless, the Docklands project stayed on the drawing board, but with little progress

Melbourne Docklands – Early renewal proposals

Nevertheless, the Committee For Melbourne’s approach became the preferred model in the proceeding strategies for the Docklands development, leading to the formation of the Docklands Authority in July 1991.

Melbourne Docklands – Kennett era – wheels set in motion

Docklands was divided into sections or precincts, which were to be tendered to private companies to be developed.

Melbourne Docklands – Kennett era – wheels set in motion

However, this would create a huge barrier between the City and Docklands.

Melbourne Docklands – Kennett era – wheels set in motion

In 1997, the Docklands commission engaged architects Ashton Raggatt McDougall to design the Docklands masterplan.

Melbourne Docklands – Kennett era – wheels set in motion

With the exception of Yarra Waters (later Yarra’s Edge) bid by Mirvac, bid for every other precinct between 1998-1999 fell through, reasons for which were often unclear due to secrecy provisions and a change of government.

Melbourne Docklands – Docklands rave history

Docklands became notable during the 1990s for its underground rave dance scene.

Melbourne Docklands – Docklands rave history

The site was host to a number of dance parties hosted by Future Entertainment and Hardware Corporation during the 1990s. DJs and performers such as Paul van Dyk, Carl Cox, Jeff Mills, Frankie Knuckles, David Morales, Marshall Jefferson and Brian Transeau|BT headlined these events. The biggest event hosted, in terms of attendance, was the Welcome 2000 New Year’s Eve dance party hosted on 31 December 1999.

Melbourne Docklands – Bracks era: new tender process

In 2000, a newly elected government of premier Steve Bracks released a new tender for Docklands Development, via Vic Urban (a rebranded Docklands Authority).

Melbourne Docklands – Bracks era: new tender process

Through the tendering process for the sites, the business park was split once more and awarded to two consortia, becoming Entertainment City (renamed Paramount Studios) – a movie theme park with film studios, to be developed by a Viacom led consortium, and Yarra Nova (which later evolved into NewQuay), to the MAB Corporation consortium

Melbourne Docklands – Bracks era: new tender process

Yarra Waters/Yarra Quays was awarded to Mirvac, later becoming Yarra’s Edge.

Melbourne Docklands – Bracks era: new tender process

The technology park was renamed Commonwealth Technology Port (or Comtech Port) before finally becoming Digital Harbour.

Melbourne Docklands – Bracks era: new tender process

A number of other sites also encountered false starts, with Victoria Harbour originally being awarded to the Walker Corporation, before being put out to tender again and finally being awarded to Lend Lease Group in April 2001

Melbourne Docklands – Bracks era: new tender process

* Site 1/753 Bourke Street, Melbourne|Bourke Street – awarded to Pan Urban JV

Melbourne Docklands – Bracks era: new tender process

* Site 2a/737 Bourke Street – Equiset

Melbourne Docklands – Bracks era: new tender process

* Goods Shed North/733 Bourke Street – Equiset/Pan Urban JV

Melbourne Docklands – Bracks era: new tender process

* Site 3b/717 Bourke Street – Global Campus Management/Babcock Brown

Melbourne Docklands – Bracks era: new tender process

* Site 5b – Under negotiation, Sama Dubai

Melbourne Docklands – Bracks era: new tender process

* Site 6 – Under negotiation, Sama Dubai

Melbourne Docklands – City of Melbourne – gradual handover

On 1 July 2007 Docklands became part of the City of Melbourne Local Government Authority, however, VicUrban retained planning authority until 2010.

Melbourne Docklands – Heritage

Significant heritage buildings include 67 Spencer Street, former railway offices (adaptively reused as the Grand Hotel apartments), the railway goods sheds (adaptively reused as an indoor market),[http://www.equiset.com.au/projects/current/projects_goodsshed.html Equiset.com.au] The Mission to Seafarers building,[http://melbourneopenhouse.org/cms-docklands/missions-to-seafarers.phps Melbourneopenhouse.org] Victoria Dock (Melbourne)|Victoria Dock and Central Pier,[http://melbourneopenhouse.org/cms-docklands/central-pier-docklands-shed-9-and-shed-14.phps Melbourneopenhouse.org] Queens Warehouse (adaptively reused as a vintage car museum),[http://www.foxcollection.org.au/ Goxcollection.org.au] Docklands Park gantry crane and a small number of warehouses and container sheds.

Melbourne Docklands – Districts

The area is broken up into a number of precincts, which are each being designed and built by a different development company.

Melbourne Docklands – Batman’s Hill

The ‘Batman’s Hill’ precinct is bordered by the Yarra River to the south, Spencer Street to the east, Docklands Stadium to the north and Victoria Harbour to the west. The precinct is named after the historical landmark Batman’s Hill, which was once located within the area.

Melbourne Docklands – Batman’s Hill

It is a mixed-use precinct including commercial and retail space, entertainment, hotels, residential sections, restaurants, cultural sites and educational institutions as well as the historic Rail Goods Shed No. 2, which was split in half to allow for the extension of Collins Street, Melbourne|Collins Street into Docklands, providing businesses with an address that is considered to be prestigious. The area is 100,000 square metres.

Melbourne Docklands – Batman’s Hill

More than half the precinct is already built, committed or under construction, and includes the Watergate/Site One apartment and small office complex, 700 Collins Street (home to the Bureau of Meteorology and Medibank Private), 750 Collins Street (the Melbourne headquarters of AMP Limited|AMP), Kangan Institute#Campuses|Kangan Institute’s Automotive Centre for Excellence (ACE) and the Fox Classic Car Museum, 717 Bourke Street (consisting of a 294 room Travelodge Hotel and 737 Bourke Street (home to National Foods).

Melbourne Docklands – Batman’s Hill

The plan would consist of four buildings, including Docklands’ tallest tower as well as civic spaces spanning two sites to be built on decking over Wurundjeri Way

Melbourne Docklands – Batman’s Hill

The offices of Fairfax Media are at 643 Collins Street. The new building, known as Media House, comprises 16,000m2 of office space accommodating 1,400 staff, on decking over railway lines opposite Southern Cross Station. The $110 million eight-storey facility was designed by architects Bates Smart to achieve a 5-star Green Star rating, and will feature a news ticker, outdoor screen and grassy plaza. It was developed by Grocon in 2009.

Melbourne Docklands – Collins Square

‘Collins Square’ (previously ‘Village Docklands’) is a 3ha precinct within the Batman’s Hill precinct. It is being developed by Walker Corporation.

Melbourne Docklands – Collins Square

Collins Square is the outcome of a split of precincts in the tender process in 2000, which resulted in Goods Shed South, 735 Collins Street and Sites 4a-4f, originally awarded to the Kuok Group and Walker Corporation.

Melbourne Docklands – Collins Square

A masterplan prepared by Marchese + Partners in conjunction with BVN Architecture|Bligh Voller Nield architects was approved in early 2002. It included a 60 storey Shangri-La Hotels and Resorts tower with a Collins Street address and a mix of commercial and residential towers, as well as the refurbishment of the southern half of Goods Shed No. 2 into a night market and food hall.

Melbourne Docklands – Collins Square

In mid-2007, a new masterplan was prepared by Bates Smart

Melbourne Docklands – Collins Square

Collins Square is currently under construction.

Melbourne Docklands – Stadium Precinct

The ‘Stadium Precinct’, which sits on the eastern edge of Docklands, consists of Docklands Stadium|Etihad Stadium, Seven Network’s Melbourne digital broadcasting centre, Victoria Point (building)|Victoria Point, Bendigo Bank offices and Quest serviced apartments. It is linked to Southern Cross Station and the Melbourne City Centre|Melbourne CBD by the Bourke Street pedestrian bridge, built over railway lines.

Melbourne Docklands – Stadium Precinct

During the 2000 Docklands development tender process, the stadium precinct was divided into four corners, the North West Stadium Precinct (NWSP), North East Stadium Precinct (NESP), North East Stadium Precinct (NESP) and South West Stadium Precinct (SWSP). The NWSP was awarded to Seven Network|Channel 7/Pacific Holdings. The NESP was awarded to Pan Urban. The SWSP was awarded to Devine Limited/RIA Property Group and the SESP – Bourke Junction Consortium (ISPT, CBUS Property and EPC Partners).

Melbourne Docklands – Stadium Precinct

Docklands Stadium (originally Colonial Stadium) was opened in March 2000. The ability for the structure to have both open and closed roof configurations has seen it host many sports events, including Australian Rules Football, soccer, cricket and Rugby football|rugby as well as concerts. The stadium complex is currently managed by Stadium Operations Ltd, which is owned by the Seven Network, with ownership transferring to the Australian Football League in 2025.

Melbourne Docklands – Stadium Precinct

Developer Pan Urban has announced plans for a $300 million twin-tower apartment development, known as Lacrosse Docklands, for the NESP, with the towers set to rise 21 and 18 storeys respectively, above the stadium concourse, with restaurants and bars opening out on to the concourse, forming a retail plaza.[http://www.docklands.com/cs/Satellite?c=VArticlecid=1203918326807pagename=VicUrban%2FLayoutsite=Docklands Docklands]

Melbourne Docklands – Stadium Precinct

Plans for the site to be known as Bourke Junction include office towers of 29 and 21 storeys on the north-eastern and south-western corners of the SESP site, as well as three lower-rise buildings housing a 250 room hotel, a pub, medical centre, retail facilities, a business club and a two-level gymnasium.[http://www.docklands.com/cs/Satellite?c=VArticlecid=1206754254119pagename=VicUrban%2FLayoutsite=Docklands Docklands]

Melbourne Docklands – Digital Harbour at Comtechport Precinct

‘Digital Harbour’ is a waterfront that has an area of 44,000 square metres, with development intended to expand to include 220,000 square metres of commercial, residential, small office/home office|SOHO units and retail space

Melbourne Docklands – Digital Harbour at Comtechport Precinct

Port 1010 received the Commercial Architecture Award at the 2007 Victorian Architecture Awards, held on Friday 13 July.[http://www.digitalharbour.com.au/default.asp?itemID=314Title=latest%20newscatID=72 Digital Harbour – latest news]

Melbourne Docklands – Digital Harbour at Comtechport Precinct

The ‘[http://www.dhba.com.au/ Digital Harbour Business Association]’ was launched in 2011. This is a group of businesses established in the Digital Harbour precinct in the Docklands. The precinct is a destination for IT, Media and other related businesses. The aim of the Association is to promote the businesses within Digital Harbour to the wider Docklands Community and the Melbourne CBD.

Melbourne Docklands – Victoria Harbour

The 12-year construction plans for Victoria Harbour include residential apartments, commercial office space, retail space, community facilities and the development of public spaces such as Grand Plaza, Harbour Esplanade, Docklands Park and Central Pier.

Melbourne Docklands – Victoria Harbour

One of the first completed office buildings in the precinct was the colourful National Australia Bank (NAB) headquarters, located at 800 Bourke Street, which accommodates approximately 3,600 staff. The building has large open floor plates, an atria, a campus-style workplace and a four-star energy rating.

Melbourne Docklands – Victoria Harbour

Almost 1,000 Ericsson employees also call Victoria Harbour home, with the company’s new Melbourne offices at 818 Bourke Street. Ericsson House sits on the water’s edge next door to the National Australia Bank HQ and Dock 5 apartments

Melbourne Docklands – Victoria Harbour

The first residential tower to be built at Victoria Harbour was Dock 5. Rising 30 storeys, it was designed by award-winning Melbourne firm John Wardle (architect)|John Wardle Architects and HASSELL. Dock 5 derives its name from its location, which was known as Dock 5.

Melbourne Docklands – Victoria Harbour

The Gauge, at 825 Bourke Street, will house the new offices of developer Lend Lease and Fujitsu. The eight-storey building was designed to achieve a six-star energy rating, becoming the second building in Docklands to do so.

Melbourne Docklands – Victoria Harbour

A Safeway (Australia)|Safeway supermarket opened in Merchant Street (opposite The Gauge) in 2008, along with a number of other retail tenancies at street level, including an optometry practice called Kaleyedoscope, Australia Post, a childcare centre, and offices above.

Melbourne Docklands – Victoria Harbour

In 2009 the Australia and New Zealand Banking Group’s (ANZ) new world headquarters at 833 Collins Street have was completed. The office complex includes shops, car parking facilities and a YMCA. It enables 6,500 ANZ staff to work in one integrated area. The new ANZ headquarters, designed by HASSELL and developed by Lend Lease, was expected to become the largest office complex in Australia. Construction commenced in late 2006. It has been designed to achieve a six-star energy rating.

Melbourne Docklands – Victoria Harbour

In 2007, Myer announced that it had chosen Victoria Harbour as the location for its new Corporate Store Support Offices. The new offices were built at 800 Collins Street, opposite ANZ.[http://www.docklands.com.au/cs/Satellite?c=VPagecid=1182927632744pagename=VicUrban%2FLayoutsite=Docklands www.docklands.com.au]

Melbourne Docklands – NewQuay

‘NewQuay’, opened in 2002, was one of the first residential and commercial developments in Docklands

Melbourne Docklands – NewQuay

Aquavista, completed in May 2007, is a strata office development and the first commercial building to be completed in NewQuay, as part of the HQ NewQuay development. Another, the seven-storey 370 Docklands Drive, is currently under construction, with a further two buildings – Lots 5 9 – currently under design development.[http://www.hqnewquay.com.au/Projects/Lots5-9/ HQ NewQuay: Lots 5 9]

Melbourne Docklands – NewQuay

The development is being designed by Plus Architecture.[http://www.newquay.com.au/About/MediaCentre/104/ NewQuay Docklands – The Avenues at NewQuay Melbourne’s Multi-Million Dollar Waterside Housing Precinct: Melbourne’s inner-city waterfront precinct][http://www.theavenues.com.au/ Marina Avenue Parkside Avenue]

Melbourne Docklands – NewQuay

The ground level podiums contain a commercial precinct with a variety of restaurants and cafes including Italian cuisine|Italian, Indian cuisine|Indian, Middle Eastern cuisine|Middle Eastern, Cantonese cuisine|Cantonese, Moroccan cuisine|Moroccan, Cambodian cuisine|Cambodian and Australian cuisine#Development of modern Australian cuisine|Modern Australian cuisines.

Melbourne Docklands – Yarra’s Edge

‘Yarra’s Edge’ is a residential precinct being developed by Mirvac, and the only Docklands precinct south of the Yarra River. When complete, it will consist of 11 apartment towers, costing Australian dollar|A$1.3 billion, and cover 0.15km2.

Melbourne Docklands – Yarra’s Edge

Yarra’s Edge was one of the first developments in Docklands, with construction of Tower 1 commencing in 2000. It is divided into 3 smaller precincts:

Melbourne Docklands – Yarra’s Edge

To date only five apartment towers have been completed, as well as the RekDek (located in the podium of Tower 1 and featuring a gymnasium and 25 metre lap pool), a public promenade, Point Park (with an outlook towards the Melbourne CBD) and a mix of restaurants, cafes and retail, including a day spa and a convenience store. Yarra’s Edge also has a 175-berth marina, giving boat owners previously unavailable proximity to Crown Casino and the City.

Melbourne Docklands – Yarra’s Edge

Webb Bridge is an award winning bridge designed by Denton Corker Marshall, in collaboration with artist Robert Owen, forming a cycling and pedestrian link to the main part of Docklands, through Docklands Park. It is the conversion of the former Webb Bridge rail link. The bridge is near the Charles Grimes Bridge, over the Yarra River|Yarra.

Melbourne Docklands – Waterfront City

Waterfront City, Melbourne Docklands|alt=A bronze statue of Kylie, on a star-shaped pedestal, portrays her in a dancing pose. Her legs are crossed and she bends at the waist, with both arms stretched above her head. The statue stands in a public square in front of a modern glass building, and several people are walking.

Melbourne Docklands – Waterfront City

‘Waterfront City’ is a shopping and entertainment area that includes the Melbourne Star Ferris wheel, National Ice Sports Centre, Melbourne|Icehouse ice sports and entertainment centre, and numerous shops and cafes which are centred on this area.

Melbourne Docklands – Waterfront City

The precinct features an integration of retail, waterfront entertainment, tourism, dining, commercial and urban community. It has an area of 193,000 square metres.

Melbourne Docklands – Waterfront City

Stage One was completed in December 2005, in time for the Melbourne stopover of the Volvo Ocean Race in January – February 2006 and the 2006 Commonwealth Games|Commonwealth Games in March 2006. The precinct currently features a large circus tent, which hosts the International Circus Spectacular, as well as a mosaic of local entertainers and a number of bronze statues, including Kylie Minogue, John Farnham, Graham Kennedy, Nellie Melba and Dame Edna.

Melbourne Docklands – Waterfront City

Stage Two includes a public entertainment area incorporating the Melbourne Star (previously Southern Star), a tall Ferris wheel in the shape of a seven-pointed star, and the Harbour Town brand direct outlet centre. Harbour Town is home to Australia’s first Costco Warehouse Store. Waterfront City also features restaurants, cafes, bars, as well as cinemas, bowling and other family entertainment options.

Melbourne Docklands – Melbourne Central City Studios

When it opened in 2004, Central City Studios became Melbourne’s largest film and television studio complex. The site is located approximately 1.5km north west of the Central Business District. It has an area of 60,000 square metres and currently consists of five film and television sound stages.

Melbourne Docklands – Melbourne Central City Studios

The first major contract for the new studios was the American film Ghost Rider (2007 film)|Ghost Rider in 2005; with a budget of nearly $120 million, at the time it was the biggest feature film to be made in Victoria (Australia)|Victoria and features scenes involving Melbourne landmarks. Since then the studios have housed international productions.

Melbourne Docklands – Melbourne Central City Studios

In 2009 the Government of Victoria, together with the Studios, undertook the Future Directions project. This has resulted in the State Government committing the Studios to focus on both the international and domestic film and television industries. Further developments to the infrastructure of the site are planned for 2010, including a refurbishment of Stage 5 as a television studio and redevelopment of the workshop.

Melbourne Docklands – Melbourne Central City Studios

Long term plans for the Studios include a large sound stage, mess hall, workshop and retail spaces, production offices, and permanent commercial tenancies.

Melbourne Docklands – Melbourne Central City Studios

On 11 October 2010 the studios were re-branded as Docklands Studios Melbourne, formally adopting the name by which the studios were commonly known.

Melbourne Docklands – Transport

Docklands Highway and Wurundjeri Way are the main roads going through Docklands. These connect to the nearby Westgate Freeway on the southern end. Links to the Melbourne CBD include extensions from Flinders Street, Melbourne|Flinders Street, Collins Street and La Trobe Street.

Melbourne Docklands – Transport

Southern Cross Station, at the eastern edge of Docklands, is the only passenger railway station, although it is also the major interchange for metropolitan and intercity rail. Much of Docklands area remains covered by rail yards previously used for freight transport and rolling stock which are being progressively reclaimed or built over.

Melbourne Docklands – Transport

Melbourne tram route 86|Route 86 runs along La Trobe Street and Docklands Drive, terminating at Waterfront City.

Melbourne Docklands – Transport

Docklands also includes major pedestrian links with a concourse extending from Bourke Street and extensive promenades along the waterfront, including the wide Harbour Esplanade.

Melbourne Docklands – Transport

Several offroad bicycle paths run through Docklands, all of which connect through the central spine of Webb Bridge, Docklands Park and Harbour Esplanade, connecting Melbourne City Centre to the inner western suburbs and the Capital City Trail.

Melbourne Docklands – Transport

There are also three ferry terminals which connect Docklands to the Melbourne City Centre and inner bayside suburbs. One at Victoria Harbour, one at New Quay and one at Yarra’s Edge.

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