ITIL Service Design [12] [13] 3

ITIL ITIL Service Design [12] [13] 3

322 Planning to Implement Service Management The ITIL discipline – Planning to Implement Service Management[9] attempts to provide practitioners with a framework for the alignment of business needs and IT provision requirements.

The processes and approaches incorporated within the guidelines suggest the development of a Continuous Service Improvement Program (CSIP) as the basis for implementing other ITIL disciplines as projects within a controlled program of work.

Planning to Implement Service Management focuses mainly on the Service Management processes, but also applies generically to other ITIL disciplines.components include: • • • • creating vision analyzing organisation setting goals implementing IT service management Small-Scale Implementation ITIL Small-Scale Implementation[10] provides an approach to ITIL framework implementation for smaller IT units or departments.

It is primarily an auxiliary work that covers many of the same best practice guidelines as Planning to Implement Service Management, Service Support, and Service Delivery but provides additional guidance on the combination of roles and responsibilities, and avoiding conflict between ITIL priorities. Overview of the ITIL v3 library ITIL v3 is an extension of ITIL v2 and will fully replace it following the completion of the withdrawal period on 30 June 2011 [11].

ITIL v3 provides a more holistic perspective on the full life cycle of services, covering the entire IT organisation and all supporting components needed to deliver services to the customer, whereas v2 focused on specific activities directly related to service delivery and support.

Most of the v2 activities remained untouched in v3, but some significant changes in terminology were introduced in order to facilitate the expansion.

Five volumes comprise the ITIL v3, published in May 2007: 1.

ITIL Service Strategy 2.

ITIL Service Design [12] [13] 3.

ITIL Service Transition[14] 4.

ITIL Service Operation[15] 5.

ITIL Continual Service Improvement[16] Service Strategy As the center and origin point of the ITIL Service Lifecycle, the ITIL Service Strategy volume[12] provides guidance on clarification and prioritisation of service-provider investments in services.

More generally, Service Strategy focuses on helping IT organisations improve and develop over the long term.

In both cases, Service Strategy relies largely upon a market-driven approach.

Key topics covered include service value definition, business-case development, service assets, market analysis, and service provider types.

List of covered processes: • Service Portfolio Management [17] • Demand Management • IT Financial Management [18] Information Technology Infrastructure Library 323 Service Design The ITIL Service Design volume[13] provides good-practice guidance on the design of IT services, processes, and other aspects of the service management effort.

Significantly, design within ITIL is understood to encompass all elements relevant to technology service delivery, rather than focusing solely on design of the technology itself.

As such, Service Design addresses how a planned service solution interacts with the larger business and technical environments, service management systems required to support the service, processes which interact with the service, technology, and architecture required to support the service, and the supply chain required to support the planned service.

Within ITIL v2, design work for an IT service is aggregated into a single Service Design Package (SDP).

Service Design Packages, along with other information about services, are managed within the service catalogues.

List of covered processes: • • • • • • • • • • Service Catalogue Management Service Level Management Risk Management Capacity Management Availability Management IT Service Continuity Management Information Security Management Compliance Management IT Architecture Management Supplier Management Service Transition Service transition, as described by the ITIL Service Transition volume,[14] relates to the delivery of services required by a business into live/operational use, and often encompasses the “project” side of IT rather than “BAU” (Business as usual).

This area also covers topics such as managing changes to the “BAU” environment.

List of processes: • • • • • • Service Asset and Configuration Management Service Validation and Testing Evaluation Release Management Change Management Knowledge Management Service Operation Best practice for achieving the delivery of agreed levels of services both to end-users and the customers (where “customers” refer to those individuals who pay for the service and negotiate the SLAs).

Service operation, as described in the ITIL Service Operation volume,[15] is the part of the lifecycle where the services and value is actually directly delivered.

Also the monitoring of problems and balance between service reliability and cost etc.

Are considered.

The functions include technical management, application management, operations management and Service Desk as well as, responsibilities for staff engaging in Service Operation.

List of processes: • • • • Event Management Incident Management Problem Management.

Request Fulfilment Information Technology Infrastructure Library • Access Management 324 Continual Service Improvement (CSI) Aligning and realigning IT services to changing business needs (because standstill implies decline).

Continual Service Improvement, defined in the ITIL Continual Service Improvement volume,[16] aims to align and realign IT Services to changing business needs by identifying and implementing improvements to the IT services that support the Business Processes.

The perspective of CSI on improvement is the business perspective of service quality, even though CSI aims to improve process effectiveness, efficiency and cost effectiveness of the IT processes through the whole lifecycle.

To manage improvement, CSI should clearly define what should be controlled and measured.

CSI needs to be treated just like any other service practice.

There needs to be upfront planning, training and awareness, ongoing scheduling, roles created, ownership assigned,and activities identified to be successful.

CSI must be planned and scheduled as process with defined activities, inputs, outputs, roles and reporting.

List of processes: • Service Level Management • Service Measurement and Reporting • Continual Service Improvement Criticisms of ITIL — 327 ITIL® pins It has been a well-known tradition for years that passing an EXIN exam in IT Service Management (based on ITIL®) does not only result in a certificate, but is also accompanied by the presentation of a metal pin which can be attached to a shirt or jacket.

This distinguishing badge with basic gold colour is set in the form of the internationally well-known ITIL®-logo.

The ITIL® pins consist of small diamond like structure that is accepted worldwide.

The meaning and the shape of the diamond depicts coherence in the IT industry (infrastructure as well).

The four corners of the pin symbolises service support, service delivery, Infrastructure Management and IT Management.

There are three colours of ITIL® V2 pins: 1.

Green, for the Foundation Certificate 2.

Blue, for the Practitioner’s Certificate 3.

Red, for the Manager’s Certificate Exam candidates who have successfully passed the examinations for ITIL® version 2 will receive their appropriate pin from EXIN or their certification provider regional office or agent.

With the arrival of ITIL® V3, there are several new pins to display your achievements.

As of July 2008, EXIN and all certification providers will also provide ITIL® pins to exam candidates who have obtained ITIL® version 3 certificates.

The new pins are very similar to ITIL® V2 pins, but every level has a different color corresponding to the ITIL® V3 core books. Organisations Organisations and management systems cannot claim certification as “ITIL-compliant”.

An organisation that has implemented ITIL guidance in IT Service Management (ITSM), may however, be able to achieve compliance with and seek certification under ISO/IEC 20000.

Note that there are some significant differences between ISO/IEC20000 and ITIL Version 3[38] • ISO20000 only recognises the management of financial assets, not assets which include “management, organisation, process, knowledge, people, information, applications, infrastructure and financial capital”, nor the concept of a “service asset”.

So ISO20000 certification does not address the management of ‘assets’ in an ITIL sense. • ISO20000 does not recognise Configuration Management System (CMS) or Service Knowledge Management System (SKMS), and so does not certify anything beyond Configuration Management Database (CMDB). • An organisation can obtain ISO20000 certification without recognising or implementing the ITIL concept of Known Error, which is usually considered essential to ITIL. References [1] David Clifford, Jan van Bon (2008).

Implementing ISO/IEC 20000 Certification: The Roadmap.

ITSM Library.

Van Haren Publishing.

ISBN 908753082X. [2] Office of Government Commerce (UK) CCTA and OGC (http:/ / www.ogc.

Gov.

Uk/ index.

Asp?id=1878).

Retrieved May 5, 2005. [3] Office of Government Commerce (UK) (http:/ / www.ogc.

Gov.

Uk/ guidance_itil.

Asp).

Retrieved August 19, 2009. [4] Office of Government Commerce (2000).

Service Support.

The Stationery Office.

ISBN 0113300158. [5] Office of Government Commerce (2001).

Service Delivery.

IT Infrastructure Library.

The Stationery Office.

ISBN 0113300174. [6] Office of Government Commerce (2002).

ICT Infrastructure Management.

The Stationery Office.

ISBN 0113308655. [7] Cazemier, Jacques A.; Overbeek, Paul L.; Peters, Louk M. (2000).

Security Management.

The Stationery Office.

ISBN 011330014X. [8] Office of Government Commerce (2002).

Application Management.

The Stationery Office.

ISBN 0113308663. [9] Office of Government Commerce (2002).

Planning to Implement Service Management.

The Stationery Office.

ISBN 0113308779. [10] Office of Government Commerce (2005).

ITIL Small Scale Implementation.

The Stationery Office.

ISBN 0113309805. [11] http:/ / www.ogc.

Gov.

Uk/ itil_ogc_withdrawal_of_itil_version2.

Asp [12] Majid Iqbal and Michael Nieves (2007).

ITIL Service Strategy.

The Stationery Office.

ISBN 9780113310456. [13] Vernon Lloyd and Colin Rudd (2007).

ITIL Service Design.

The Stationery Office.

ISBN 9780113310470. [14] Shirley Lacy and Ivor Macfarlane (2007).

ITIL Service Transition.

The Stationery Office.

ISBN 9780113310487. [15] David Cannon and David Wheeldon (2007).

ITIL Service Operation.

The Stationery Office.

ISBN 9780113310463. Information Technology Infrastructure Library [16] George Spalding and Gary Case (2007).

ITIL Continual Service Improvement.

The Stationery Office.

ISBN 9780113310494. [17] http:/ / wiki.

En.

It-processmaps.com/ index.

Php/ Service_Portfolio_Management [18] http:/ / wiki.

En.

It-processmaps.com/ index.

Php/ Financial_Management [19] http:/ / www.itskeptic.org/ free-itil [20] http:/ / www.nationalarchives.

Gov.

Uk/ doc/ open-government-licence/ open-government-licence.

Htm [21] Meyer, Dean, 2005. “Beneath the Buzz: ITIL” (http:/ / web.

Archive.org/ web/ 20050404165524/ http:/ / www.cio.com/ leadership/ buzz/ column.

Html?ID=4186), CIO Magazine, March 31, 2005 [22] Survey: “The ITIL Experience – Has It Been Worth It”, author Bruton Consultancy 2004, published by Helpdesk Institute Europe, The Helpdesk and IT Support Show, and Hornbill Software. [23] Microsoft Operations Framework; Cross Reference ITIL V3 and MOF 4.0 (http:/ / go.

Microsoft.com/ fwlink/ ?LinkId=151991).

Microsoft Corporation.

May 2009. . [24] http:/ / www.thefitsfoundation.org [25] Van Bon, Jan; Verheijen, Tieneke (2006), Frameworks for IT Management (http:/ / books.

Google.com/ books?id=RV3jQ16F1_cC), Van Haren Publishing, ISBN 9789077212905, [26] http:/ / www.itsmsolutions.com/ newsletters/ DITYvol2iss3.

Htm [27] ISACA (2008), COBIT Mapping: Mapping of ITIL V3 With COBIT 4.1 (http:/ / www.isaca.org/ Knowledge-Center/ Research/ ResearchDeliverables/ Pages/ COBIT-Mapping-Mapping-of-ITIL-V3-With-COBIT-4-1.

Aspx), ITGI, ISBN 9781604200355, [28] Brooks, Peter (2006), Metrics for IT Service Management (http:/ / books.

Google.com/ books?id=UeWDivqKcm0C), Van Haren Publishing, pp. 76–77, ISBN 9789077212691, [29] Morreale, Patricia A.; Terplan, Kornel (2009), “3.6.10.2 Matching ITIL to eTOM” (http:/ / books.

Google.com/ books?id=VEp0aMmH3iQC), CRC Handbook of Modern Telecommunications, Second Edition (2 ed.), CRC Press, ISBN 9781420078008, [30] ITIL V3 Qualification Scheme (http:/ / www.itil-officialsite.com/ Qualifications/ ITILV3QualificationScheme.

Aspx).

OGC Official Site. .

Retrieved 2011-05-02. [31] APMG (2008). “ITIL Service Management Practices: V3 Qualifications Scheme” (http:/ / www.itil-officialsite.com/ nmsruntime/ saveasdialog.

Asp?lID=572& sID=86). .

Retrieved 24 February 2009. [32] “EXIN Exams” (http:/ / www.exin-exams.com/ ).

EXIN Exams. .

Retrieved 2010-01-14. [33] “ISEB Professionals Qualifications, Training, Careers BCS – The Chartered Institute for IT” (http:/ / www.bcs.org/ server.

Php?show=nav. 5732).

BCS. .

Retrieved 2010-01-14. [34] http:/ / www.apmgroupltd.com/ [35] Office of Government Commerce (2006). “Best Practice portfolio: new contracts awarded for publishing and accreditation services” (http:/ / www.ogc.

Gov.

Uk/ About_OGC_news_4906.

Asp). .

Retrieved 19 September 2006. [36] http:/ / www.apmgroup.

Co.

Uk/ ITILSCRquery.

Asp [37] http:/ / www.certification-register.org/ [38] Office of Government Commerce (2008). “Best Management Practice: ITIL V3 and ISO/IEC 20000” (http:/ / www.best-management-practice.com/ gempdf/ ITIL_and_ISO_20000_March08.

Pdf). .

Retrieved 24 February 2009. 328 External links • Official ITIL Website (http://www.itil-officialsite.com/home/home.asp) • The OGC website (http://www.ogc.gov.uk/) Information technology planning 329 Information technology planning Information Technology Planning is a discipline within the Information Technology domain and is concerned with making the planning process for information technology investments and decision-making a quicker, more flexible, and more thoroughly aligned process.[1] According to Architecture & Governance Magazine, (Strategic) IT planning has become an overarching discipline within the Strategic Planning domain in which enterprise architecture is now one of several capabilities.[2]

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